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Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

Letter from Professor Clyde Manschreck to MLK

Sunday, July 7, 1963

Clyde L. Manschreck, a professor of church history at the Methodist Theological School in Ohio, asks permission to include "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in his upcoming collection entitled "History of Christianity from the Reformation to the Present," as well as the letter that inspired it.

Letter from Dora McDonald to F. Newton Miller

Tuesday, February 9, 1965

In Dr. King's absence, Dora McDonald writes F. Newton Miller concerning Dr. King's appearance in Rockville Centre on February 21. McDonald encloses a copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Rose R. Silvers of the Rockville Centre Commission to clarify the misunderstanding.

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Letter from Robert Balkind to Rev. Abernathy about NAACP

Monday, April 15, 1968

This letter, written by the CEO of Hampton Manufacturing Co., references an attached letter for the NAACP.

Letter from Martha Williams to MLK

Wednesday, March 31, 1965

Martha Williams, who serves as the Acting Secretary of "The Zippers," a Chicago-based social and charity club, forwards a donation to the SCLC. She discusses the recent march from Selma to Montgomery when Alabama guardsmen respectfully removed their helmets during a prayer at the culminating rally. Williams extends a special prayer of protection for Dr. King and civil rights workers.

Letter from EEOC Commissioner Samuel C. Jackson to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Commissioner Samuel Jackson sends Dr. King a copy of the First Annual Report of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Aid Victims of South Africa's Racism

Members of the American Committee on Africa solicit funding for the support and advancement of victims of Apartheid in South Africa. This brochure highlights the unjust treatment of black South Africans through individual testimonies.

What is The OIC Institute?

The Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) Institute was founded in 1964 by Reverend Leon H. Sullivan in response to public demand for a centralized resource for economic and social progress. This brochure outlines the program's history, principles, and current executive leaders.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

The American Jewish Committee

Friday, March 1, 1968

The American Jewish Committee reports on two projects recommended by the Kerner Commission to address "the imbalance between white and Negro in America."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Walter E. Fauntroy

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. Walter E. Fauntroy of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C. for a monetary contribution. Dr. King also explains how the money will help the SCLC work towards racial unity.

Telegram to MLK from H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Police brutality in the black communities of Prattville, Alabama prompts this request sent to Dr. King, which seeks immediate federal investigation and protection of black prisoners.

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Statement by Albert Raby Responding to Attack on MLK by Ernest Rather

Albert Raby responds to questions by Ernest Rather about Dr. King's statistics related to Negro housing conditions. He explains that Dr. King's facts were taken from the 1960 census, which he contrasts with statistics from the Department of Urban Renewal.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Randall Elias

Thursday, December 30, 1965

This letter is Dr. King's reply to Mr. Randall Elias's letter regarding a civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield. Dr. King writes that the SCLC is in Chicago, but is unaware of any planned civil rights march .

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Rev. Jackson updates Dr. King on his recent activities, how hard he has been fighting for equality for all Americans, and regrets to inform him that he is ill.

Letter to Ruth D. Beyer from Dorothy Gaines

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Dorothy Gaines provides Ruth D. Beyer with the address of the Montgomery Improvement Association due to the possibility of a check lost in the mail.

Statement by Albert A. Raby

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Albert A. Raby releases a statement denouncing the Illinois State Senate for rejecting an equal housing bill. Mr. Raby calls for a tent-in and rally at the construction site for the proposed Weston plant. Raby cites Illinois is in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and that federal funding for the Weston Project be terminated.

Letter from Fred Bennette to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

Director Reverend Bennette requests that Dr. King increase the telephone allowance for Operation Breadbasket, stating that frequent phone calls must be made in order to keep the program active.

Letter from MLK to Transportation Workers Union President Matthew Guinan

Tuesday, March 8, 1966

Dr. King thanks newly elected Transport Workers Union President Matthew Guinan for his contribution that will aid SCLC in their efforts. However, the contribution was made out to Dr. King, which causes him to inform Mr. Guinan to make the check payable to the SCLC. Dr. King congratulates Guinan on his recent position and wishes him much success.

The Self

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's book "The Source of Human Good."

Letter from Abe Feinglass to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964

Abe Feinglass, International Vice-President of Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America, requests that Dr. King review and comment on the organization's pamphlets.

Papal Infallibility

Dr. King defines papal infallibility.

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

Letter from Sam Jones to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968

In this letter, dated January 11, 1968, Sam Jones expresses his disappointment in Dr. King for not acknowledging his letters. Jones wrote several letters to King asking for assistance in the struggle to restrain the Florida State Legislature's "Lily White" body from writing a new State Constitution.

Letter from Mr. Raymond F. Gregory to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1962

In this letter dated 2/28/1962, Mr. Raymond F. Gregory of a New York City law firm writes to Dr. King regarding legal considerations for the "Ghandi [sic] Foundation."

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."