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Letter from Roslyn Wilkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Roslyn Wilkins of California asks Dr. King for his opinion on interracial marriage. Wilkins asserts that her mother would rather her marry a Japanese man because, as Wilkins is white, they are closer in color.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Letter from John H. Sengstacke to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1957

Mr. Sengstacke informs Dr. King that he will be presented with the Certificate of Award in honor of his selection to the 1956 Chicago Defender Honor Roll.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Gaulan

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

This is a letter from Dr. King to Joseph Gaulan to thank him for the letter of support while he was in the Birmingham jail.

SCLC Board Members

This document lists the SCLC's executive board of 53 members.

Letter from James E. Davis to MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1966

Rev. James A. Davis requests the assistance of Dr. King in his graduate studies focusing on pastoral care and race relations. Davis was recently appointed as the assistant pastor of the Carroll Street Methodist Church in Nashville and expresses distaste with the fact that there are no Negroes members in the congregation. Davis wishes for the Carroll Street Methodist Church to become more inclusive.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, July 25, 1966

This document outlines the financial statements of the Atlanta home office of the SCLC. The figures are from July 25, 1966 through July 28, 1966.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter from Sankey Blanton to MLK

Wednesday, October 3, 1951

Sankey Blanton, of Crozer Theological Seminary, sends Martin Luther King, Jr. half of his fellowship grant for the 1951-1952 academic year. A second check will be sent when they have received his first semester grades and registration for the second semester.

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.

Letter from Lymell Carter to MLK

Thursday, January 17, 1963

Reverend Lymell Carter, Minister of Wesley Chapel C.M.E. Church, informs Dr. King that the Clarksville community is in need of his appearance. Reverend Carter details the racial demographics of the Tennessee town and the minimal voting capacity of the African American population. He notes the urgency of Dr. King's appearance to assist with the issues of integration and necessary political influence of the black community.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd, lacking the ability to offer better figures, for the Japanese rights to "Strength to Love."

A Note with no Addressee from the Desk of Joan Daves

A note on Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, letterhead to an unaddressed recipient about Japanese annotations of "Strength to Love."

Letter from William Ryan to MLK

Monday, March 1, 1965

William Ryan, member of Congress writes Dr. King after he and other members of Congress were able to visit Selma. After witnessing the conditions at hand, they have been urged to break the barrier on the right to vote.

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Monday, August 13, 1962

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.

Letter Judith Van Swaringen to MLK

Tuesday, December 8, 1964

Judith Van Swaringen, a senior at Surrattaville High School in Clinton, Maryland, writes to Dr. King requesting information for her report dealing with the Reverend's steps leading to the Nobel Peace Prize.

Ralph Bunch Cooke's High School Report Card

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

This document is Ralph Bunch Cooke's report card reflecting his four years as a student at North Warren High School in Smiths Grove, Kentucky.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Philadelphia Inquirer: Balance of Payments 'Cure' Was Devised in Near-Panic

Thursday, January 11, 1968

This article by Rowland Evans and Robert Novak criticizes a proposed 2% border tax on imported goods. They argue that President Johnson's support of such a measure is reckless and will cause economic repercussions around the world.

Chicago Daily Defender: SCLC Aide Makes Spirited Capital March Call Here

Monday, February 5, 1968

The Chicago Daily Defender published this article about Rev. Ralph Abernathy's visit to Chicago to promote the Poor People's Campaign. According to Abernathy, "Come this summer, thousands of poor Americans are going to take their burdens to the White House and they'll leave them with LBJ."

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

Letter from Maurice Mitchell to Neil Sullivan

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Mr. Mitchell discusses fundraising for SCLC's Chicago literacy project. HEW recently withdrew their support of the project, but Mitchell is optimistic about potential support from foundations and major donors.

Revolution in the Delta: Farm Hands Go on Strike

David R. Underhill discusses the strike of farm laborers in various Mississippi Delta cities. Underhill highlights strike procedures, methods, and locations.

Redirecting Emotion

Dr. King writes on the redirection of emotion as a method of emotion management. He states that in order for one's emotion to be successfully redirected, one must project their emotion onto a different, unifying object, namely an ideal.

Montesquieu

Dr. King references French social commentator Montesquieu regarding his ideas on history. King quotes, "He attempts to show how civilization has been modified by the action of the external world."

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.