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Thank you Letter from MLK

Friday, January 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Thank you Letter from MLK to Dr. Jones at Morehouse College for an autographed copy of "A Candle In The Dark"


Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

Telegram from Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Mr. Spock invites Dr. King to send a representative to a discussion on the upcoming Washington Vietnam Mobilization.

Cause, Error and Law

Dr. King quotes from Alfred North Whitehead's The Concept of Nature.

Telegram from Alfred Duckett to Mrs. King

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY

Alfred Duckett asks Mrs. King to airmail her "program breakdown" to meet a printing deadline.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

Tuesday, September 28, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, California, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, CONGO / ZAIRE

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Friday, August 20, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Dr. Abernathy Appeals to New Governor of Alabama

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC)

Ralph David Abernathy, vice-president of the SCLC, issues a press release concerning the federal governments decision to halt funding to the state of Alabama for noncompliance with the 'law of the land'. Abernathy appeals this decision and asserts that the blame should be directed towards local government officials such as George C. Wallace.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), JAMAICA

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter From a Very Concerned Christian to MLK


The Christian author of this letter includes a poem to express concern and anguish regarding the War in Vietnam.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967
New York, NY, Detroit, MI

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

Stockholm, Sweden, Oslo, Norway

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

The Many Faces of Black Power


The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

Why We Can't Wait Title

New York, NY

This document is a portion of a newspaper that contains the title "Why We Cant Wait" by Martin Luther King Jr.

Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

VIETNAM, Illinois (IL)

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Letter from Clarence Henry to Robert F. Kennedy

Friday, February 2, 1962
New Orleans, LA

Clarence Henry requests the immediate surveillance of Fred Shuttleworth's home by Kennedy's office in lieu of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest.

Letter from Jack Krieger to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Los Angeles, California, New York (NY)

Jack Krieger requests a reprint of Dr. King's speech delivered at the Riverdale Church in New York on the topics of peace and the Vietnam War.

Telegram to MLK Regarding a Social Eruption in Chicago

Tuesday, June 14, 1966
Chicago, IL

Junius Griffin sends Dr. King a typed version of his statement on the violence occurring in a predominately Puerto Rican neighborhood in Chicago. Through the incident, Dr. King notes the callousness of law enforcement in the area.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

MLK Examination Blue Book

Friday, May 23, 1947

Dr. King used this "Blue Book" to record answers for a Bible exam taken on May 23, 1947.

Family Planning-A Special and Urgent Concern

Thursday, May 5, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

This document contains Dr. King's response on receiving the Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the Fiftieth Anniversary Banquet of Planned Parenthood-World Population. Margaret Sanger is famous for opening the first birth control clinic in the USA and establishing Planned Parenthood. Dr. King discusses the benefits of family planning for the Negro family, as well as similarities between his and Margaret' Sanger's efforts for equality. Also featured is a photograph of Coretta Scott King accepting the award on Dr. King's behalf.

Letter from James Harrison to Otis Roberts

Friday, December 22, 1967
Washington, D.C.

James Harrison, SCLC's comptroller, explains an itemized breakdown of finances related to a grant from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Friday, May 17, 1957
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Detroit, MI, EGYPT

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966
Nevada (NV), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

The Eternal Significance of Christ

Dr. King outlines a sermon and references the Book of 2 Corinthians. The passage states "It is impossible to understand the significance of Christ without understanding the whole history of Biblical religion."

Telegram to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The sender of this telegram is requesting to know if Dr. King intends to travel to Sweden.