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Medical Order for MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

During a private medical visit at St. Joseph Hospital, Dr. James D. Palmer documents a list of orders to be administered to Dr. King.

Press Conference Statement on New York

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Dr. King addresses the city of New York and the problem of mounting violence. Dr. King urges the city to help take a stand by promoting social justice through nonviolence efforts and strategies.

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

King to Visit Southside Virginia

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

This article describes Dr. King's visit to Virginia on the "people-to-people" tour as a part of the Poor People's Campaign.

Breadbasket and National Tea Agree

Monday, December 12, 1966

Operation Breadbasket teams up with the National Tea Company to improve employment and business opportunities for Negroes.

Letter from Tommie Crockett to MLK

Tommie Crockett expresses his appreciation for the work of Dr. King. He explains that black people are getting tired of the nonviolence method and are beginning to embrace the term, "Black Power." He explains that blacks will no longer participate in peaceful civil rights demonstrations because, "we already done that."

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, February 11, 1963

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Erik Ruden

Tuesday, March 17, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Erik Ruden that Dr. King will only be able to speak twice during his upcoming trip to London and that an associate will need to travel with Dr. King.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Pickett

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Pickett's poem and some questions that she sent. He offers condolences for the loss of her husband and promises that the "redemptive suffering of few brings new life to many."

Telegram from NY Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The NY Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action sends Dr. King well wishes and hopes for a speedy recovery.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Wyatt Tee Walker

Friday, November 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary sends Wyatt Tee Walker information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Letter from Gene Riley to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

Gene Riley writes Coretta Scott King requesting that she contribute to a spring planting project.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Letter from Joseph P. Robinson to MLK

Friday, July 28, 1967

Reverend Joseph P. Robinson invites Dr. King to contribute to Robinson's book of sermons titled, "Pulpit Evangelism."

Conference on Strengthening the New Politiics

Sunday, November 28, 1965

The Conference on Strengthening the New Politics was formed from a desire to have real constituencies who have control over their elected officials and a concern for local grassroots political development. It is the hope of this conference that the styles of liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement could come together to form a new elective politic.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

Letter from C. Summer Stone Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Chuck Stone, assistant to New York Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, follows up with Dr. King about a telephone conversation between Powell and Dr. King. The discussion centered on Dr. King preaching at Abyssinian for the anniversary service. Stone reiterates Powell's hopes that Dr. King will be able to participate.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. thanks Dr. King for his previous telegram in support of the discharge petition on home rule for the District of Columbia. The home rule gives some of congress' power over the district to the local government. The petition was finally approved in 1973.

150 Religious Leaders March on OEO

Friday, October 14, 1966

This press release addresses Sargent Shrivers' decision not to refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi and to express concerns regarding the National War on Poverty.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

John Duns Scotus

Dr. King records these notes about the life of John Duns Scotus, a noted Scottish philosopher and theologian of the High Middle Ages.

Letter from Edwina C. Johnson to MLK

Edwina C. Johnson claims that the racial problems in the United States are the result of "what is recorded as 'The American Heritage'" and its debasement of African Americans in media, particularly textbooks. Johnson suggests emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in American history. Johnson also provides a list of freedoms that should not be denied to African Americans.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Letter from Wilma Wolsink to MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1966

Wilma Wolsink, an eleven-year-old girl from Holland, writes to Dr. King to express her support. She also requests an autographed photograph.