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Letter from Dan Aldridge to MLK

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dan A. Aldridge, President of the Foundation Life Insurance Company, recalls a previous visit to Dr. King's home. Aldridge requests an appointment with Dr. King to discuss several important business matters.

The Dexter Echo: February 20, 1957

Wednesday, February 20, 1957

The Dexter Echo is the official publication of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. The newsletter mentions Dr. King, who was minister of the church at the time, and Coretta Scott King in articles pertaining to their farewell party and Mrs. King receiving an award.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row, informs Dr. King about the enclosure of the first copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

SCLC Chicago Adult Education Project

Tuesday, September 12, 1967

In this progress report, Robert L. Green and Stoney Cooks outline the education and employment conditions facing African Americans in the Lawndale community of Chicago, Illinois. The two authors further outline the program objectives, procedures, organization, and funding of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Chicago Adult Education Project which seeks to address Lawndale's social issues.

Handwritten Notecard about Peace

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines J Maritain's views on Peace, from the book Christianity and Democracy.

Report of the Insurgent Editor's Conference

These minutes of the "Insurgent Newspaper Editor's Conference" record the events of the conference from start to finish. The minutes also describe prominent topics of the conference, including the difficulties publishing an insurgent newspaper on a tight budget, reaching a large audience, and generating powerful content. The minutes end on a positive note: "a good time was had by all."

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

SCLC Warns of Disaster in Mississippi

The SCLC issues a statement regarding a fire that destroyed their office at the Bell Flower Baptist Church in Grenada, Mississippi. The SCLC set up a new office in Grenada to continue programs including school integration, voter registration, and development of community leadership.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

AFON received a grant of $60,000 from the Stern Family Fund. Mr. Wachtel offers Mr. Hunter a report of progress and invites him to a conference concerning the grant.

Letter from Sam Garwood Concerning MLK's Involvement with the Vietnam Conflict

Sam Garwood expresses his opinion on the Vietnam War. It could have a negative effect on the Civil Rights Movement if Dr. King doesn't address the situation in a pleasing way to Americans. He believes that a lot of support gained could be lost due to the War.

Reason (Its Value in Revelation)

Dr. King quotes John Locke’s “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book IV.”

Science

Dr. King records a definition of "science", quoted from John F. X. Pyne's "The Mind."

Letter from C. M. Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Mrs. Johnson requests Dr. King's help in reinstating Congressman Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from MLK to Michael Swann

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, Scotland on selected dates in 1967 and 1968. He assures the recipient of the letter that he is grateful for the invitation, however, he states that he already has commitments on the proposed dates.

Remarks at the Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, asserts that the citizens of the US have permitted evil and racial discrimination for too long. He joins forces with those against inequality with hopes for a better lifestyle for all Americans regardless of the color of their skin.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins writes Dr. King requesting that Southern Christian Leadership affiliates overflow senators with messages promoting support.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Friday, August 12, 1966

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

Index Card with Dr.King's Handwritten Philosophy Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines insights on pantheism and references philosophers Goethe, Spinoza, and Rousseau. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from Frank Clarke to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965

Frank Clarke requests a letter of recommendation from Dr. King. Mr. Clarke seeks to obtain the position of the Assistant Press Secretary to the President.

Letter from Sheldon L. Gutman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Sheldon L. Gutman writes Dr. King urging him to utilize his prominence by consistently speaking out about the issues of the world. Gutman also expresses concern regarding America's potential retaliation to China detonating a hydrogen bomb.

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.

Letter from some White Citizens of Mississippi to MLK about a Wedding

Wednesday, July 27, 1966

In this letter Mrs. A.N. Brown and several others express their interest in having Dr. King demonstrate in front of a church at which Lucy Johnson will be getting married.

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

Friday, March 9, 1962

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

Letter from Melvin D. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Melvin D. Kennedy, Editor at Morehouse College, writes Dr. King about the book, "Perspectives in Freedom and Progress, 1863-1963: An appraisal of the Negro's First Hundred Years of Freedom." He explains that the book is a non-profit venture that will add to the Negro narrative and highlight Negro accomplishments. He goes on to request that Dr. King contribute a chapter about the Negro's fight for freedom.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. H.L. Hayward about a Contribution

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to Mrs. H.L. Hayward for her contribution to the SCLC while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and the quest for civil rights.

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Sunday, December 3, 1961

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Operation Breadbasket

Saturday, December 10, 1966

Rev. Jesse Jackson meets with National Tea Company and Del Farm Foods representatives to sign an agreement that will create jobs for blacks.