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Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

Press Release from the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Sunday, January 15, 1967

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty releases a letter to President Johnson signed by numerous civil rights, labor, religious and community action groups calling for him to take leadership in the War on Poverty by increasing funding. The press release also announces a January 26 national meeting in Washington, D.C. to discuss the War on Poverty.

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Mr. Reed, Mr. Baldwin and Slums

Dr. King writes a story pertaining to a Mr. Reed and Mr. Baldwin to describe the importance of keeping after one's soul.

Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

Letter from David B. Lord to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King , David B. Lord draws connections between the Vietnam War and poverty in American society. He agrees with Dr. King's stance on the war and approach to civil rights. According to Mr. Lord, real civil rights progress cannot be made until a solution is found to the war.

Letter from Playboy Magazine to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Doug Benson writes on behalf of Hugh Hefner in response to a letter from Dr. King requesting donations. Benson informs Dr. King that Mr. Hefner, who supports the civil rights struggle, suggests placing a shorter, more personalized, appeal for funds in The Playboy Forum.

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

Letter from Carroll Whittemore to MLK

Friday, September 25, 1964

Carroll Whittemore inquires about a promotion for Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" to be distributed to roughly 60,000 clergymen. He further requests a photograph of Dr. King to be used for publicity purposes, in a gallery of outstanding ministers.

The Danger of Misguided Goodness

Under the title, "The Danger of Misguided Goodness," the central message in these sermon notes is the need for all individuals to be morally conscientious.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Letter from Client's Law Firm to MLK

Tuesday, September 20, 1966

Green, Ayers, Swigert, and Cluster write a letter to Dr. King requesting that he speak to Randolph T. Blackwell and encourage him to acknowledge receipt of a poem.

Alabama Council Newsletter

Amidst a battle between federal and states' rights, Reverend Hughes discusses the arrival of the Commission on Civil Rights and its intended purpose in the state of Alabama.

Letter From Harry A. Ploski to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Harry A. Ploski writes Dr. King concerning a book he and Professor Roscoe Brown have written. Hoping to solicit endorsement, he encloses a copy of the table of contents and an outline of the topics addressed.

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Letter from Frank Clarke to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965

Frank Clarke requests a letter of recommendation from Dr. King. Mr. Clarke seeks to obtain the position of the Assistant Press Secretary to the President.

Letter from Claudie Erleigh to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966

On behalf of the NUSAS Local Committee, Claudie Erleigh writes Dr. King requesting that he submit an article for the "NUSAS Journal." Dr. King's entry would extend further beyond the "general interest." The committee has also invited other influential leaders, such as Senator Robert F. Kennedy, to contribute to this journal.

Jesus

This note card seems to reflect some of Dr. King's personal insights on Jesus. It belongs to a series of note cards devoted to the topic of Jesus.

Gray Power

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This sketch was originally sent to Dr. King from John McClellan along with a letter that titled the sketch, "Gray Power."

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy regarding the topic of monotheism.

Social Ethics

Dr. King refers to Micah 3:9-12, saying the prophet condemns the love of money of civil and religious leaders. King wonders whether religious leaders today should be paid for their work and concludes that money should never be a priority over service.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Letter from Edwin Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, discusses an invitation for Dr. King to speak for the Buffalo Baptist Association. He suggests that Dr. King consider accepting the invitation because the association has good attendance from both Negroes and whites.

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.