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"DENMARK"

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from Ann Bettiglan to MLK

Monday, August 16, 1965

Ann Bettiglan writes Dr. King informing him that her friend Daniza Thompson is in need of financial help. She gives Dr. King her friend's address and phone number so that he can assist her.

Memorandum from the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

The purpose of this memorandum from Rev. James Morton and James Twomey was to attempt to get funding for urban renewal. It was the goal of the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission to create low-income housing for those in need.

Message from the President

Dr. King expounds on the importance of nonviolence and voter registration to the mission of the SCLC.

Letter from Eva Rosenfeld to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Eva Rosenfeld writes Dr. King expressing her support of his stance on the Vietnam War, regardless of critics like the NAACP. She asserts that King's mentality is wise and "that hope for all of us lies in seeing these issues as one issue, an issue of our humanity."

Letter from Rev. Hazel E. Foster to MLK

Thursday, July 14, 1966

Reverend Hazel Foster writes to Dr. King in support of his continuous struggle. He talks about memorizing the Sermon on the Mount and the importance to him and leaders like Gandhi. He offers words of encouragement and prays that Dr. King may find peace during these hard times.

Letter from Dr. David Tillson to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dr. David Tillson writes Dr. King congratulating him on his stand for peace in Vietnam.

Letter From David Fishman to MLK

Monday, January 28, 1963

Mr. Fishman, a disciple of Robert Ingersoll, praises Dr. King for a lecture he delivered at Orchestra Hall in Chicago Illinois. He concludes by comparing his personal religious beliefs to common pedagogy.

Letter from Fernando DeEquidazu to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Students from Spain write Dr. King, showing their appreciation for his leadership to the Civil Rights Movement, and asks if Dr. King can supply them with articles for magazines in Spain.

Letter from Marc Steel to Rev. R.D. Abernathy about a Term Paper

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Marc Steel, a high school sophomore from Maryland, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy, requesting information on his role in the Civil Rights Movement. This student sought to acquire a narrative of Rev. Abernathy and his goals for SCLC, in order to complete a term paper.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Minutes

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

These meeting minutes of the Executive Board of the A. Philip Randolph Institute include discussions on the urgent need for legislative action on the Freedom Budget, a possible theoretical and analytical magazine on the Negro struggle for equality, and celebration of Mr. Randolph's 80th birthday.

Progress

Dr. King quotes from Browning's "A Death in the Desert."

Letter from MLK to Michelle Feinberg

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King responds to Michelle Feinberg, a special education student from Gary, Indiana. In the letter, Dr. King tells Michelle her letter meant a lot to him and she is fortunate to have a special teacher.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Letter of Support from Sara Mitchell to MLK

Sunday, June 11, 1967

A member from the Board of Education of the City of Atlanta congratulates Dr. King on his article in the "Progressive" taken from "Where Do We Go from Here?" She also informs Dr. King that she is taking the article to the school board.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from MLK to Steve Rubicz

Friday, October 5, 1962

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Steve Rubicz to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to speak at the University of Washington. Dr. King regretfully declines due to several speaking engagements on his schedule keeping him from accepting additional commitments.

Letter from Abie Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962

Mr. Williams, a former parishioner of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, now imprisoned, bids Dr. King's pastoral advice. In addition, he requests a few of Dr. Kings books for studying purposes.

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

Letter from Nancy Atkinson of Time Magazine to MLK

Wednesday, April 29, 1964

Nancy Atkinson sends Dr. King a duplicate of the Time Magazine cover honoring him as the Man of the Year for 1963. He is informed that the cover will be a part of a traveling exhibit of other Time covers.

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Thursday, December 8, 1966

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Benjamin E. Mays Regarding Meeting

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

In this letter to Benjamin Mays, the president of Morehouse College, Dora McDonald state that Dr. King will be in attendance at their meeting on December 19, 1962.

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.

Letter from Mrs. Lewis Cooper to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

Mrs. Cooper writes Ms. McDonald to invite Dr. King to speak at the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago in January 1968.

We Would See Jesus

Sunday, May 7, 1967

Dr. King gives this sermon to a congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He conveys a message of Christ's acceptance of all despite any person's wrong doings in the past. He also points out that Christ's work is exemplified through individual acts of kindness and helping others.

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

Numbers

Dr. King cites several verses from the Book of Numbers.