Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"DENMARK"

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

Monday, April 10, 1967

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

The Montgomery Improvement Association

Dr. King expresses gratitude for his receipt of a kind letter and informs the recipient that their words of sympathy have endorsed great moral support.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

Thank-U-Gram from June E. Price to MLK

June E. Price sends Dr. King a "Thank-U-Gram" to congratulate him on the inspiring message he recently delivered and his dynamic leadership in the fight for first-class citizenship.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Editorial- "Lawlessness Means Bloodshed, End of Dreams"

In this article, light heavy-weight boxing champion Archie Moore discourages black Americans from resorting to "lawlessness" in their attempts to advance the cause of civil rights.

Letter from Leon Forer to Dr.King

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Leon Forer expresses that Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here" is a "sobering testament to our times." In this letter he also makes a suggestion to change the appendix.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

Thursday, June 8, 1967

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Supralapsarianism

Dr. King provides a definition of the term supralapsarianism.

Letter from Charles E. Blackburn to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Charles Blackburn shares with Dr. King a mutual passion for change. Blackburn expresses that his concern is not with the "American Negroe's revolt against hypocrisy," but with the hypocrisy as it applies to the young white generation.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

Letter from Rev. Canon John S. Yaryan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 13, 1964

Rev. Yaryan writes to confirm Dr. King's appearance at the Grace Cathedral in San Francisco. He asks that Dr. King preach not only for their morning service, but also the evening worhsip service as well.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Thomson, a representative of the Canadian Friends' Service Committee, invites Dr. King to participate in a week-long conference held in Toronto, Ontario. The event will consist of diplomats from all over the world.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Remarks by MLK in Acceptance of the Spingarn Medal

Friday, June 28, 1957

In his acceptance speech for the Spingarn Medal, Dr. King remarks about the need for continuing the fight for social justice and equality around the world. He acknowledges the work of NAACP along with protesters as they continue to be on the frontline in addressing the nation's social ills.

Letter from Vivian Dilday to MLK

Friday, October 27, 1967

Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday writes Dr. King on behalf of the Committee on Benevolences of The Riverside Church in New York. Enclosed with the letter is a $1,000 check for the SCLC.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Friday, December 27, 1963

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Saturday, November 24, 1962

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

Capitalism

Dr. King references Karl Marx's thoughts on capitalism.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Sunday, March 12, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond about a Visit to Lyons, France

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Madame Bremond for a pleasurable visit to Lyons, France at which occurred a "great ecumenical gathering."

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

The Relation of Morality and Science to Religion

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's view on the relation of morality and science to religion.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

Telegram from Richard Avedon supporting MLK

Saturday, April 17, 1965

This telegram in support of Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War was sent by notable photographer, Richard Avedon, his wife, and Michael Mindlin.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

Memo from the East Garfield Park Organizing Staff to James Bevel, Bill Briggs, Bernard LaFayette, and Jim Poling

Friday, September 2, 1966

In this memorandum, the organizing staff of East Garfield Park outlines their plans of action to end slums. Their agenda is designed to operate the organization effectively.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Dr. King Does Know Where We're Going

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

In this letter to the editor, Rev. W. Alfred Wilkins responds to a recent editorial, which reviewed Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" Rev. Wilkins explains why he disagrees with the previous editorial, and he summarizes several chapters he considers relevant.