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"DOMINICAN REPUBLIC"

Letter from MLK to Minnie N. Thompson

Monday, April 9, 1962

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Minnie N. Thompson for her encouragement. He states he will make an effort to meet her son when he visits the Morehouse College Campus.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Letter from Sam Jones to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968

In this letter, dated January 11, 1968, Sam Jones expresses his disappointment in Dr. King for not acknowledging his letters. Jones wrote several letters to King asking for assistance in the struggle to restrain the Florida State Legislature's "Lily White" body from writing a new State Constitution.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK's Reply to an Invitation

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King regrets to inform Robin Skuce of his inability to accept her invitation to speak at a seminar for a Canadian high school under the auspice of the United Nations Association in Canada. Dr. King informs Miss Skuce that he must decline her offer due to preparation of several SCLC programs scheduled for the following year.

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Monday, March 2, 1964

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

Mastering Our Fears

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

Letter from Ruth Frank Rosenwald to MLK

Ruth Frank Rosenwald writes urging Dr. King to commend Robert Kennedy for his advocacy of peaceful alternatives to war and to invite him to issue a joint call for a meeting of civil rights and peace leaders and President Johnson for dialogue on U.S policy in Vietnam, Santo Domingo and West Germany.

Letter from George F. Berlinger to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Mrs. George Berlinger of the Nathan Hofheimer Foundation, informs Dr. King that the organization will not be including the SCLC in their budget. The Nathan Hofheimer Foundation sought to improve the living conditions of the underprivileged.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Letter from F.A. Guilford to MLK

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press asks permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" for their third edition textbook "Free Government in the Making." He further requests to obtain the world rights to the letter for worldwide distribution.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

MLK Appears on “Tonight” Show with Harry Belafonte

Friday, February 2, 1968

This press release informs individuals about Dr. King's upcoming appearance on the NBC-TV "Tonight" show with Harry Belafonte.

Letter from Rev. A. S. Markham to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

Reverend Markham, Executive Head of the British Methodist Episcopal Church and Executive of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto, informs Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Sholom Synagogue would like to present an award to him. The award honors a person who has contributed to "the needs of humanity in a most outstanding manner."

Letter from Steve Rubicz to MLK

Thursday, September 20, 1962

Steve Rubicz, of the Student Peace Union at the University of Washington, invites Dr. King to join a "speakers circuit" that will travel to a number of colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

Monday, February 5, 1968

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

Response to SCLC Attendance at Cooperative League Meeting

Friday, July 28, 1967

Following up a letter sent by Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, Stanley Dreyer, president of The Cooperative League of the USA, writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson. Mr. Dreyer hopes that it will be possible for Rev. Jackson to be present at the meeting held in Des Plaines, Illinois on August 11.

Letter from Hester DeLacy to MLK

Hester De Lacy contributes to the SCLC and expresses an urgent need for written copies of Dr. King's speeches. Mr. De Lacy informs Dr. King that he would prefer a copy of a speech delivered to a large and small audience in both the North and South of the country.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett to MLK

Monday, September 9, 1963

The American Friends Service Committee is a peace and service organization that seeks to promote social justice in the United States and around the world. Mr. Pickett, a current representative, invites Dr. King to be a part of a lecture series that will be presented in all major U.S. cities. In addition, he offers Dr. King monetary compensation for travel and hospitality accommodations.

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

Thursday, January 2, 1969

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

Letter from James Hershey to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Joe T. Denman writes Dr. King on behalf of the Citizens For Progress Organization hoping to sponsor a speaking date in Yakima, Washington. Denman requests that the Reverend forward the date that he will arrive.

Letter from Bernhard M. Auer to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Bernhard Auer, publisher for Time magazine, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude for Dr. King's role in helping attain accurate information throughout the year of 1961.

Letter from Robert Balkind to Rev. Abernathy about NAACP

Monday, April 15, 1968

This letter, written by the CEO of Hampton Manufacturing Co., references an attached letter for the NAACP.

"Discerning the Signs of History"

Sunday, November 15, 1964

Dr. King believes that there are lessons in understanding the process of history, that evil carries the seed of destruction and that militarism is ultimately suicidal. Dr. King states that "history teaches the lesson that all reality hinges on moral foundations."