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"DOMINICAN REPUBLIC"

Pride

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from MLK to Audrey Mizer

Friday, December 29, 1961

Dr. King addresses Audrey Mizer's concerns regarding his position on "admitting Red China to the United Nations." He explains that he realizes the sensitivity of this topic but feels that the issue must be tackled in a realistic manner.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Thank you letter from George R. Metcalf to MLK

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Mr. Metcalf, president of the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, thanks Dr. King for joining the Advisory Council. Mr. Metcalf expresses his belief that Dr. King's participation on the council "will greatly strengthen the National Committee in its efforts to attain equal opportunity in housing."

Telegram from Paul Deitrich to John Lewis

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Paul Deitrich commends John Lewis for his speech in Washington and urges him to contact him whenever he is in Washington again. He also wants to express a much-delayed apology.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. to MLK

Harry Van Arsdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO, informs Dr. King, who is in the Fulton County Jail, that ten thousand unionists in New York voted to support Dr. King's fight for "decency and democracy." The organization contributes $1000 to aid Dr. King in his efforts.

Agnosticism

Dr. King quotes Ernst Haeckel's "The Riddle of the Universe."

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

Toynbee: List of Twenty-One Societies

Dr. King notes the twenty-one civilizations described in Arnold Toynbee's "A Study of History."

Letter from Ernest Evans to MLK about Help

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Ernest Evans is writing to Dr. King asking him to come by his home while he is visiting Chicago. Evans discusses the problems of his living conditions and the increase in the cost of living. He hopes that Dr. King will be able to bring about positive change for the community.

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Saturday, October 26, 1963

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

Memorandum to MLK about Black Power and the Marks of Slavery

This memorandum to Dr. King addresses the significance of black power and the marks of slavery. It also references excerpts from "The Peculiar Institution" by Kenneth Stampp.

Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Secretary to Joan Regarding the Rights to "Strength to Love"

Monday, June 15, 1964

In this letter, the secretary asks Joan the status of the Japanese Edition to "Strength To Love", since Dr. King hadn't had the time to write the preface.

Project Concern Pamphlet

This Pamphlet, made by Project Concern, discusses the efforts taken to help the impoverished and sick.

Letter from Constance A. Price to Peter H. Dominick

Tuesday, October 3, 1967

Constance Price addresses grievances and complaints related to human rights. She demands appropriate and necessary congressional actions.

Edwin B. Allaire's Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Mr. Allaire informs Dr. King that there are many individuals who would vigorously support him in becoming a presidential candidate.

House Un-American Activities Committee

Friday, May 15, 1964

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

Letter from Al Hearin to MLK about Public Appearance

Monday, October 30, 1967

In this letter Al Hearin expresses his admiration for Dr. King and his character, but also expresses his concerns that he, Dr. King, is possibly being used by communist elements in society. Hearin also requests that Dr. King write him a handwritten letter about a life changing experience. Furthermore, Hearin requests an autographed picture.

March On Mississippi

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Florence Fyall describes a scene of violence on peaceful demonstrators in her poem entitled March On Mississippi."

Letter from Gunnar Fagerberg to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964

Dr. King is the recipient of this invitation to speak made by the students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Linda Brown

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student expresses condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.