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"DOMINICAN REPUBLIC"

Problems of Whitehead

Dr. King discusses the problem of metaphysical dualism as presented by philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. Dr. King reviewed much of Whitehead's work while at Boston University and later quoted him in his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
MEXICO, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Letter from MLK to Alvin Jackson

Tuesday, February 19, 1963
Connecticut (CT), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King advises Alvin Jackson to contact the NAACP Legal Defense Fund to obtain assistance.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Monday, August 7, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

Western Union Telegram from James McDaniel to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

Mr. McDaniel invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the executive committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Another Opinion: I Oppose the War in Vietnam

VIETNAM, Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

This column contains excerpts from an address given by Dr. King in Chicago, in which he expresses his concerns regarding the Vietnam War and how it will affect poverty in America.

The True Nature of Religion

Dr. King discusses the true nature of religion as both an inward and outward experience. The subject "He" is unidentified.

Biographical Sketch of Andrew Young

AUSTRIA, SWITZERLAND, New Orleans, LA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Hartford, CT, Albany, GA, St. Augustine, FL

This document outlines the education, pastoral, and vocational experience of Andrew J. Young, Executive Director of the SCLC.

Letter from Marie Turner to MLK

Thursday, May 2, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this letter Marie Turner of the American Friends Service Committee requests copies of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to be reproduced and distributed.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Letter from Mrs. George W. Hammond to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
New Hampshire (NH)

Mrs. Hammond writes Reverend Abernathy with the hope of finding someone to purchase her home in Bristol, New Hampshire.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Monday, March 21, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Flyer for Confront the Warmakers at the Pentagon

California (CA)

This flyer from the Southern California Mobilization Committee advertises a public meeting. At the meeting, the committee plans to provide comprehensive reports from Washington and display a slide show of recent demonstrations. In addition, they plan to discuss future SCMC activities.

Telegram from Burton Mousman to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

In this telegram, Burton Mousman urges Dr. King to accept an invitation for an approaching speaking engagement at the CALTECH YMCA.

Environmental Influence

Dr. King contemplates "environmental influence" by comparing Spencer and Darwin.

Christianity and Civilization

Dr. King records a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's "Civilization on Trial" and the view that "religious progress comes through the birth and death of civilization."

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Boulware

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Boulware of Newark, New Jersey expresses her sympathy for Mrs. Coretta Scott King after the death of Dr. King. Boulware mentions that she was one of Dr. King's supporters and was a participant in the March on Washington. She closes by stating that Dr. King "is not dead, he is only resting."

Letter from Kathy Boudin to MLK

Thursday, September 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Conference Coordinator Kathy Boudin invites Dr. King to participate in a three-day conference held by the students of Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges.

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

Friday, May 6, 1966
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL

William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., GERMANY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, North Carolina (NC), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Ohio (OH)

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

Letter from MLK to Willie Faust

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King responds to a letter from Willie Gate Faust regarding an inquiry pertaining to legal advice and his release from jail. Reverend King refers the inmate to Attorney Donald Lee Hollowell, counsel for the NAACP.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Letter from Marian Machesney to MLK

Wednesday, November 22, 1961
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA)

Marian Machesney writes Dr. King to praise the book "Stride toward Freedom." Machesny also explains the issues of a family where the children are in need of food and education while describing the help he has offered them. Mr. Macheaney expresses his wish to be ordained as a minister by the Western Christian Leadership ministers and states that he is ready to quite entirely if he does not receive the help or advice he has been seeking.

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.

Augustine's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.