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"DOMINICAN REPUBLIC"

Postcard from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967
JORDAN

The Mayor of Jerusalem sends Dr. King a panoramic postcard of the city.

Letter from Grace Graham to MLK

Tuesday, June 18, 1963
Oregon (OR), Montana (MT)

Grace Graham, Chairman in the School of Education extends an invitation for Dr. King to give a series of lectures at several colleges in the Northwest. In addition to the University Oregon, other colleges include Montana State and Portland State.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Albany, GA

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), ETHIOPIA, Texas (TX), CUBA

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty Project Summary

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty summarizes a nationwide project focused on eradicating poverty, providing funding for education, and creating more effective ways to utilize welfare spending.

Letter from Dr. Lionel Newsom to Georgia Council on Human Relations Members

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

In the aftermath of the failure in attacking segregation in Albany, Georgia, the Chairman of the Georgia Council on Human Relations issues an appeal to its members to help support their continued fight. Dr. Lionel outlines the organization's past accomplishments and encourages members to learn from their mistakes in Albany to yield better results in the future.

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

Tuesday, March 3, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, EGYPT, GREECE, Johannesburg, South Africa, KENYA, GHANA, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, CHINA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Stanley Terry

Wednesday, October 10, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Reverend Terry of New York for his witness in Albany, Georgia.

Mission to Mississippi

California (CA), North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965
Selma, AL, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Letter from Frank J. Pastor to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from Frank Pastor was written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, EGYPT, HUNGARY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, NETHERLANDS, FRANCE, INDONESIA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Washington (WA), CANADA, Colorado (CO), New Hampshire (NH), Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

Letter from Pamela Schnida to MLK

Friday, October 10, 1067
Wisconsin (WI)

Pamela Schnida writes to Dr. King requesting information on the riots that occurred in 1967.

American Negro Corporation Plan

New York (NY)

This document is a plan created by Sterling B. Conaway. The purpose was to create a business organization for Negro professionals to invest in their future. This document also outlines the purpose and priorities of the organization.

Letter to Dr. Neil V. Sullivan from Robert L. Green

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Berkeley, CA

Robert Green expresses his appreciation for Dr. Neil Sullivan's chapter contribution in the book, "Education and the Urban Poor." Mr. Green is pleased when he discovers Dr. Sullivan has contributed a portion of the book profits to Dr. King and the SCLC. The book will be in demand for college level courses focusing on education, psychology and sociology.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

Letter from George W. Cooke to MLK Requesting Autograph

Montana (MT)

Mr. George Cooke of Great Falls, Montana requests Dr. King's autograph on a Time Magazine cover where his photo appeared. Mr. Cooke further states he has been collecting autographs for over 7 years and has more than 300 autographs.

Belafonte

Wednesday, September 27, 1961
Nashville, TN

This program details a 1961 Harry Belafonte concert sponsored by the SCLC.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), CANADA

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Note Card on Revelation

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines the meaning of revelations. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, and bible verses.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960
New York, NY, Iowa (IA), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Cambridge, MA

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

Appeal for Brotherhood to the City of Birmingham

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

On behalf of the Southern Alabama Movement for Human Rights and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, C. T. Vivian writes this appeal in the "spirit of nonviolent love" to the citizens of Birmingham. His purpose is to awaken conscientiousness and gain their support in creating brotherhood and a better city.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

Support Card from Ida White and Jenae Jackson to MLK

Atlanta, GA

Ida Mae White and Jenae Jackson send Dr. King this spiritual card regarding faith in God during his time in jail.

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Monday, February 10, 1958
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Editor of The Nation Offers Unsolicited Advice

Friday, December 23, 1966
New York, NY

The editor of The Nation solicits Dr. King's annual article for the next publication. This year, McWilliams suggests that Dr. King expand beyond the usual update on the civil rights agenda. He then offers advice that King consider moving to New York, where the political environment is right for promoting ambitious programs and his leadership ability would be able to shine.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Martin J. Morand, Vice-President of the Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg, inquires about Dr. King's availability to serve as a guest speaker at a late 1964 meeting in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

MLK Address to the Congress of Federated Organizations

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS

Dr. King addresses the participants in the COFO Mississippi Summer Freedom Project in 1964. He pledges the full support of the SCLC to aid in their mission to register Negro voters and educate them in the process of political participation. In spite of bombings, arrests, and other forms of intimidation, Dr. King urges the members of COFO to persistently work to eliminate the roadblocks to full citizenship.