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"Dallas, TX"

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from L.S. Saxet to MLK Regarding Support for James Meredith

In this letter, L.S. Saxet encourages Dr.King to support James Meredith in his run for Congressional office. Saxet claims that to vote another candidate into office would result in embarrassment for the Negro people.

Letter from Bill Dady to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

In this letter, "Free Men and Free Markets," a book by Robert Theobald, is introduced to Dr. King by Bill Dady.

Letter from Frank Emspak to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Frank Emspak, of the National Coordinating Committee to End the War in Vietnam, invites Dr. King to a convention to speak about his antiwar and pacifism sentiments.

Hruska Says Capital...

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Thursday, November 29, 1962

Melvin Arnold addressed this letter to Dr. King, inquiring about the publishing of his second book, "Stregnth to Love."This letter contains a request for Dr. King to negotiate a contract and deal with issues of royalties. Also included is Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

Letter from Dora McDonald to James McKee Concerning Antioch College Visit

Tuesday, June 15, 1965

Dora McDonald writes James McKee regarding the time of Dr. and Mrs. King's arrival and security arrangements for Dr. King's appearance at Antioch College.

Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 22, 1967

This letter informs fellow members of the Spring Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam of the successes of their organization and serves as a call to action on the upcoming steps.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Employment Recommendation Letter to MLK from Stone's Mercantile Agency on behalf of Raymond C. Fauntroy

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

In this letter Thelma Goldsborough, a representative of Stone's Mercantile Agency, requests a personal reference for Raymond C. Fauntroy from Dr. King.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

J.H. Emms to MLK

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter of Condolence from Martin and Coretta Scott King to Mrs. Lee Gaber

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Mr. & Mrs. King express sincere condolences to Mrs. Lee Gaber and family during her time of grief.

If I Can Help Somebody

These are the words to a song written in 1945 by Alma Bazel Androzzo that was made famous by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Dr. King quotes this song in his Drum Major Instinct sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

Letter from James Huger to MLK Regarding Recent Visit

Monday, January 15, 1968

Mr. Huger, City Commissioner of Dayton Beach, Florida, informs Dr. King how much he enjoyed a recent visit to Ebenezer, and wishes Dr. King good health and success.

Negro Leaders' Mistakes Hurting Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In this article, David Lawrence explains his dissatisfaction with "Negro leaders" for supporting the actions of Adam Clayton Powell, who in Lawrence's mind, has abused his office and trust.

Letter from Ann B. Houston to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

In this letter Ann B. Houston of the American Friends Service Committee offers her gratitude for a contribution received from the Benevolence Club of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She further states that the funds have gone to good use in South Vietnam towards the manufacture of artificial limbs using local immigrated labor.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.

Letter from Patterson Charles Jr. to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Patterson Charles, Jr. writes Dora McDonald asking for Dr. King's help regarding alleged racial discrimination in a legal matter.

The Martin Luther King Fund

Friday, April 9, 1965

The Toronto Chapter of the Martin Luther King Fund organization commends Dr. King for his progessive actions to combat racial injusitices in the United States. The chapter contributes to Dr. King's organization for their active participation in the betterment of Selma, Alabama. In support of an official MLK day in Toronto, the organization invites Dr. King to speak.

Letter from Larry Boyd to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965

Larry Boyd, President of the United Piedmont Society, writes Dr. King in relation to a contribution his organization forwarded to the SCLC. Boyd writes that he has yet to receive a response from the SCLC regarding a donation of $2,000.

God

Dr. King quantifies the capabilities of God's will through Job 42:2 and the affirmation that God is able do everything.

Negroes Hurl Rocks; Cops, Drivers Hurt

An anonymous critic comments on a headline story that details a riot in Lansing, Michigan. Two additional reports are featured in the newspaper clipping including a short piece on Dr. King's visit to Jackson, Mississippi for a four day SCLC convention and a union convention in Kansas City, Missouri.

Letter from Michael Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Rev. Michael Hamilton, Washington Cathedral Canon, thanks Dr. King for contributing a speech to be published in the book "The Vietnam War - Christian Perspectives." Rev. Hamilton informs Dr. King that proceeds from the book will be donated to the Swiss International Committee of the Red Cross. He also invites Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and use the platform to discuss current Congressional legislation. Dr. King would eventually preach his last sermon at the Washington Cathedral on March 31, 1968, four days before his assassination.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.