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Letter from MLK to Berl Bernhard

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King writes Berl Bernhard, Staff Director of the Commission on Civil Rights, to introduce him to Mrs. Walter Lee Mengledorff. Mrs. Mengledorff is a resident of Savannah, Georgia, and "has concrete evidence on voting irregularities in Chatham County, Georgia. She is interested in bringing the whole matter to the attention of the Commission on Civil Rights.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

Letter from Mildred Maroney to MLK about a Donation

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter Mildred Maroney of the Brookings Institute forwards a donation which was an honorarium due to Mr. Robinson Hollister. This was done because Mr. Hollister requested that the honorarium be donated to the SCLC on his behalf.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Archibald

Dr. King informs Mrs. Archibald of the importance of continuously fighting for peace, not only domestically, but in foreign affairs as well.

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

Letter from Annie L. Cook to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Annie Cook asks Dr. King to make a speech at a program sponsored by the Greenbrier County branch of the NAACP. She predicts that the program will be informative and improve communication between Negros and whites.

Letter from Robert Beverly to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Robert Beverly of the City Employees Union Local 237 writes to Dr. Abernathy informing him of the enclosed May edition of the union's newspaper.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program Brochure

This brochure, which describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Citizenship Education Program, states the purpose of the program and also explains how the community can "prepare for first-class citizenship." Included is a brief article by Dr. King entitled "What Makes A First Class Citizen." In the article, Dr. King lists characteristics that first class citizens possess, such as literacy, participation in the political process and an understanding of the Constitution.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Letter from Esther Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Esther Thompson inquires if Dr. King and his church could be of assistance with helping her blind husband see again.

Letter from G. Mansfield Collins to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

G. Mansfied Collins outlines Dr. King's travel arrangements to a Christian Conference held in Southern California, in which Dr. King is urged to discuss unemployment.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

Sunday, April 16, 1967

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

God

Dr. King notes that Jeremiah 9:23 speaks of man's ability to know and understand God in contrast to modern theology's claim that God is beyond knowing.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Pinn Memorial Baptist Church

Sunday, September 11, 1960

This program outlines the Sunday morning worship service for Pinn Memorial Baptist Church. Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker to deliver a sermon on September 11, 1960.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. and Mrs. Jones congratulate Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. They send their regrets for not being able to attend the dinner to honor Dr. King's accomplishment.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Letter from Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Charles C. Holbrock, Jr. reminds Dr. King that he has written him last November for information for a term paper.

Letter from John Madigan to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Madigan writes to Dr. King thanking him for his participation in a CBS Television program "At Random." He invites Dr. King to participate in another program entitled "Target: News."

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

The United Ministries

The prayer ask for God to help people become stronger in Christ while saving them from the evil and violence within the world.

Letter Dated 10/15/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Monday, October 15, 1962

Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a letter to Mr. Mel Arnold acknowledging the enclosure of a sermon by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "How Should a Christian View Communism?"

Letter from A3C Johnson to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Mr. Johnson writes to Dr. King requesting a recommendation letter for reclassification. Johnson explains that he is highly affiliated and a notable person must write his recommendation.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

The author argues that the Civil Rights Movement joining the Peace Demonstrators will aid America's enemies and prolong the Vietnam war.