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President Johnson Requests Off the Record Conversation

Monday, February 13, 1967

Clifford L. Alexander Jr., Deputy Special Counsel to President Lyndon B. Johnson, conveys the President's request for an off the record meeting.

Telegram from Mrs. Dorothy Johnson to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Mrs. Dorothy Johnson writes Dr. King to express her support of his endeavors while he is in jail in Birmingham, Alabama.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Ralph Abernathy sends best wishes to Dr. King and everyone affiliated with the Civil Rights Movement. Rev. Abernathy is disheartened because he is not present to assist with the movement, but assures Dr. King that he wants to be an active participant.

MLK and the Alabama Boycott

This caricature of Dr. King depicts his trail from the March on Washington to his pursuing a boycott on the state of Alabama, following the Selma to Montgomery March. Gib Crockett of the Washington Star is the cartoonist for this drawing.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.


Dr. King cites theologian Emil Brunner regarding man's knowledge of God.

Letter From MLK to Ben Ari

Friday, September 22, 1967

This letter from Dr. King declines a request to go on a religious pilgrimage to the Holy Land due to turmoil in the Middle East.

Letter from Rose Auguste to MLK

Rose Auguste asks Dr. King for a list of publishers that are open to Negro work. She is looking for a publisher for her manuscript, which has a "spiritual and supernatural theme."

Aristotle's Answer to Parmenides

Dr. King outlines Aristotle's response to Parmenides regarding being and nothingness.

Letter from Toni Harris to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Toni Harris, a student in NYC, wrote this letter to Mrs. King sharing her hope that Dr. King's killer would be caught. This letter is an example of the many levels of support shown towards the King family, from schoolchildren who loved Dr. King.

International Convention of Christian Churches Session Schedule

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

This program for the International Convention of Christian Churches provides an itinerary for a one-day session taking place in Dallas, Texas. A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary, sends this final letter to coordinate all aspects and help guide participants. Dr. King is listed on the schedule as a guest speaker and intends to deliver an address entitled "Beyond Discovery Love."


Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, May 12, 1965

The Program Committee of the World Convention of Churches of Christ requests Dr. King for the delivery of a major address at the Seventh Assembly in Puerto Rico. Laurence V. Kirkpatrick, the acting general secretary and friend of Reverend Andrew Young, contacts Dr. King to inquire about the status of the original invitation because the organization has yet to receive a response.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Friday, September 8, 1961

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter from MLK to Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller

Friday, September 14, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King writes to New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller to express his gratitude for the Governor's letter and copy of his new book. Dr. King also refers to the possibility of Gov. Rockefeller's making "a large contribution to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights," and writes extensively about the Society and the effect such a contribution would have.

MLK in Memoriam

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marshall E. Bean

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Dora McDonald communicates to Marshall E. Bean that Dr. King is remembering him in his prayers and sends a photograph as a visual reminder. Miss McDonald also includes a scripture from the Book of Psalms.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to Wyatt Tee Walker

Monday, September 24, 1962

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Wyatt Tee Walker regarding the progress of the SCLC. Kennedy believes that the right to vote will eliminate "continued discrimination and injustice."

Letter from Prarthana Samaj Bombay (India) to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

The former ambassador of India to the United States previously wrote Dr. King, inviting him to the Centenary Celebrations. The author recalls this invitation and references the history of Bombay's Prarthana Samaj. The organization is founded on the betterment of society, religion and education. The Prarthana Samaj would be proud to welcome Dr. King, as he is an "apostle" of Mahatma Gandhi.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

MLK on Brown versus Board of Education

Dr. King writes notations regarding the Supreme Court's decision in 1954 of Brown versus Board of Education, listing the various positive and negative aspects of that decision. The Reverend closes by stating, "Let us go and unite and be inspired once more..."

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Telegram from Ms. Dora McDonald to A.J. Cervantes

Ms. Dora McDonald responded to a telegram sent from St. Louis Mayor A. J. Cervantes, inviting Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is." The conference, held in St. Louis, MO, was to feature civil rights leaders, mayors and other organizers. Ms. McDonald informed Mayor Cervantes that Dr. King was out of town and to look for a response from Dr. King at a later time.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Letter from MLK to Private Freddie J. Friend

Sunday, February 25, 1962

Responding to a letter dated February 8th, which made claims of mistreatment, Dr. King responds to Private Friend with a proposed solution to his problem.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Sunday, November 29, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, includes a summary of several foreign contracts drawn on Dr. King's behalf for three of his books.

Letter from Robert L. Pino to MLK

Monday, August 13, 1962

Mr. Pino, Chairman of the Local Union 2603 Civil Rights Committee of Lackawanna, New York, praises Dr. King's efforts in Albany, Georgia.