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The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

Idealism

Dr. King cites several statements regarding idealism.

Open Letter Regarding Chicago Real Estate Practices

Monday, August 1, 1966

Lee Brooke, of Oak Park River Forest Housing Committee near Chicago, sends an open letter to members of Congress, the Governor of Illinois and the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. In it, he discusses discriminatory real estate practices in the Chicago area, and presents evidence gathered by the housing committee to show why there is a need to regulate the real estate industry.

Meet the Press

Sunday, August 21, 1966

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Preliminary Outline for a Conference on Democratic Planning For America

This preliminary outline features a number of keynote dignitaries and leaders who will address a number of economic, labor, and social justice issues during the three-day Conference on Democratic Planning for America.

Postcard from Ann Flynn to SCLC

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Ann Flynn writes the SCLC requesting the full text of a speech made by Dr. King at an event sponsored by Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Anne Farnsworth to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Anne Farnsworth acknowledges the kind letters Dr. King sends thanking her for the past financial contributions she has made to the movement. She further encloses a check in honor of the four little girls killed in the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham and the assassination of President Kennedy.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Geerten to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Geerten express their appreciation for Dr. King's address at Riverside Church and extend their complete support.

Letter from M. G. Gilligan to MLK and James Baldwin

Saturday, July 6, 1963

Mrs. M. G. Gilligan expresses admiration to Dr. King and Mr. Baldwin for the production of the television program entitled "Perspectives."

SCLC News Bulletin for November 1967

This November 1967 news bulletin published by the SCLC contains updates regarding progress of the Civil Rights Movement, excerpts from the President's Annual Report and financial facts for the organization's supporters.

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

Friday, March 9, 1962

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

Letter from Local 89 Members to Martin Luther King, Jr.

In this letter dated March 5, 1968, the Anti-Discrimination and Civil Rights Committee of Local 89 invites King to speak at their membership meeting on April 1, 1968. Albert Jenkins, Emil Ramirez, and Wendell are the members of Local 89 who sent this letter.

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

Letter from MLK to Rev. William A. Dennis

Monday, January 20, 1958

Dr. King requests the presence of Reverend Dennis at a SCLC Executive Board meeting in Atlanta, GA. Reverend Dennis responds by stating he will not be able to attend, but he will send someone in his place.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to F. D. Kirkpatrick

Monday, March 4, 1968

Rev. Abernathy commends Rev. Kirkpatrick on his job with the Steering Committee and discusses the enclosure of receipts.

SCLC Agenda's

Monday, June 26, 1967

This is the agenda set out to specific people within the SCLC.

Barth

Dr. King notes Swiss theologian Karl Barth's favorite expression on revelation.

SCLC Voter Registration Agenda

This document captures the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's voter registration agenda in Detroit, Michigan between August 18 and August 23, 1967.

Evil

Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Letter from Robert Bartlett to MLK

The minister of the First Congregational Church sends encouraging words to Dr. King after his attack in Harlem, New York.

Letter from AJ Muste to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A.J. Muste encloses a letter from Cherian Thomas to Dr. King and references a previous telegram he sent congratulating Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Program for SCLC Annual Freedom Banquet

Monday, August 8, 1966

This program from SCLC's Tenth Annual Freedom Banquet features Senator Edward M. Kennedy as guest speaker.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Tuesday, April 27, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.

Letter from Robert L. Martin to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964

Dr. Robert L. Martin, Associate Professor of History at Texas Christian University, invites Dr. King to come speak to the university.

Telegram from Elizabeth Polste to MLK

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Mrs. Polste writes to Dr. King requesting a tribute for Emily Greene, who is also a Noble Peace Laureate and a founder of the Womens International League for Peace and Freedom.

Community of Glenville, City of Cleveland,

This 1965 brochure from the Office of the City Planning Commission, Cleveland, OH, focuses on the "almost all-Negro community" of Glenville. In it the Commission discusses both its ability to assist the community and the responsibility of the community to engage in grass roots activities that would serve as a springboard for larger scale urban renewal. The overall message of the brochure is that for the City to provide assistance, the community will have to "begin at home".

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty Project Summary

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty summarizes a nationwide project focused on eradicating poverty, providing funding for education, and creating more effective ways to utilize welfare spending.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Athanasius, St.

Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian St. Athanasius, identifying him as the defender of the Nicene faith.