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MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Paint

Noting the vastness of the sky and "heavens," Dr. King comments on the Earth, stars, and surrounding planets.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eleanor H. Allen

Monday, December 16, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Eleanor Allen regarding assisting a church affected by recent bombings. McDonald encloses the address of Reverend John Cross, Pastor of 16th Baptist Church, in Birmingham, Alabama.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

Charles Renouvier

Dr. King outlines the philosophical career of Charles Renouvier.

Letter from MLK to SCLC Action Committee

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Dr. King reminds members of the Action Committee of their upcoming meeting. He requests that each member come prepared to "make a report on [their] category of activity concerning the Washington Mobilization."

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Home Rule

Dr. King urges President Johnson to support the administration bill on Home Rule for Washington, D.C. rather than pursue a compromise.

Letter from Alan S. Traugott to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mr. Traugott contributes a check to SCLC indicating his grateful endorsement of Dr. King's position on civil rights and peace.

Letter from Clifford L. Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Clifford L. Alexander, Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, wrote to Dr. King to encloses some clippings from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission News Digest, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post regarding the EEOC's hearings on white collar discrimination in New York.

Article: "MLK Writes Co-Religionists from Jail"

Thursday, June 13, 1963

The Witness Magazine published the first of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." The second part will appear in the next issue on June 27, 1963. The article describes Dr. King's letter as "one of those rare 'to-read-twice' documents."

Letter from MLK to Gaylord Nelson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Gaylord Nelson, a United States Senator from Wisconsin, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. Jesse Jackson

Dr. King writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson, urgently requesting his presence at a meeting of the Action Committee for Washington.

Self-World

Dr. King paraphrases Paul Tillich's view on the "self world polarity." Being a self, Dr. King writes, means being "both subject and object." This subject matter later appeared in Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Memorandum from Dr. King

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

Dr. King addresses this memorandum to the organizers of a "Stall In" at the World's Fair. He advises against the demonstration and only advises it when "persistent attempts at good faith negotiations have completely failed."

Telegram from Andrew Young to the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Andrew Young, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes the Swedish Ecumenical Council's Nils Sundholm, informing him that Dr. King can accept his invitation to host a worship service in Sweden in December as part of his trip to Europe.

Man

Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Symbolic Mountains

On the stationary of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York, Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Symbolic Mountains." These include the mountains of ethical relations, practical materialism, indifference concerning poverty, and racial segregation.

Salvation

Dr. King records New Testament verses related to salvation.

In A Land Where Murder is Respectable

This pamphlet, issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, features a map of Alabama highlighting 18 murders of African Americans and white civil rights workers.

Morality

Dr. King documents a quote from British statesman John Morley regarding the morality of war. Dr. King refers to the quote, taken from Morley's publication "Recollection," as a "grand, potent monosyllable." Following the citation, Dr. King comments, "This is an agnostic talking."

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Educational Conference Program 1967

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Dr. King serves as a guest speaker at a conference sponsored by The Allied Educational Foundation. This program outlines the itinerary for the event including the presentations of other speakers namely Max Lerner, Harrison E. Salisbury, Senator Gale W. McGee, and Stanley Levey.

Three Stages of Christological Controversy

Dr. King lists three stages of Christological controversy. The third is the "relation" between the former two.

Letter from A. K. Magugu to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

The Office of Kenya National Celebrations congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. In addition, the author encloses an invitation card in hopes that the Reverend may attend their Anniversary and Republic Day Celebrations.