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Sin

Dr. King notes that I Chronicles 21:1 says that Satan ordered David to conduct a census but that another account indicates it was the Lord. He questions why it was regarded as sinful to take a census.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, October 19, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Benjamin E. Mays that Dr. King will attend the Morehouse Board of Trustees luncheon.

Holiday Letter from the Best Family

In this Christmas Card, the Best Family wishes all of their friends and supporters a Merry Christmas.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Friday, November 4, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses British royalties for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom."

Notecard- Collective Egotism

In this notecard, Dr. King is outlining Nicbuhr's view of collective egotism.

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Letter from James Hershey to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Joe T. Denman writes Dr. King on behalf of the Citizens For Progress Organization hoping to sponsor a speaking date in Yakima, Washington. Denman requests that the Reverend forward the date that he will arrive.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 6:1.

Letter from Charles Woodall to MLK

Monday, February 8, 1965

Charles Woodall, representing the All Souls Unitarian Church of Santa Cruz, California, congratulates Dr. King on his efforts in the fight for freedom. Woodall explains that he is a Georgia native that once lived in Selma, Alabama in the early 1900's. At the time of this letter the SCLC and SNCC were in the middle of a massive Negro voter registration campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Hubert Reaves to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

As an inmate in Jackson, Michigan, Hubert Reaves writes Dr. King to express his interest in the SCLC, and inform him of his future education in ministry at the Detroit Bible College. Mr. Reaves also includes a letter to Mr. Goodall inquiring about his inmate account and the sending of his letters.

Letter from Carson Lyman to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964

Carson Lyman, managing editor of U.S. News and World Report, encloses the transcript of an interview with Dr. King. Lyman asks Dr. King make any necessary changes to the transcript, but to make sure "to preserve the informality of the language."

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Letter from Christopher Pearce to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Mr. Pearce, a young English filmmaker, desiring to produce a documentary on Dr. King, requests permission to follow him about Washington, D. C. during his upcoming visit.

Letter from Rabbi Aaron Decter to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Rabbi Aaron Decter congratulates Dr. King on his demonstration in Montgomery and invites Dr. King to a dinner.

Letter from MLK to Coretta Scott King

Saturday, October 1, 1960

In an intimate letter to Mrs. King, Dr. King informs her of his recent arrival to the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He urges her "to be strong in faith" as she is also pregnant with their third child at the time. He expresses his hope for a family visit that coming Sunday, and his desire to remain intellectually engaged during his four-month sentence.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

MLK Handwritten Notes

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding 'Love' and uses Reinhold Niebuhr as a reference.

Letter from the European Baptist Federation to Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 7, 1964

P.M. Smith, Dr. Ruden's secretary, writes to Miss McDonald to express gratitude for Dr. King's consideration in attending the European Baptist Federation Conference in Amsterdam.

Letter from MLK to G. Lawrence Jones

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King writes G. Lawrence Jones distressed that Jones doesn't have the funds to pursue higher education. King states, "Our troubled world needs very much for young men with the courage and foresight you display to receive every chance to develop your full potential."

Letter Starlet Roberts to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Starlet Roberts, a fifth grade student, asks Dr. King for a picture for her class book of Famous Negroes.

War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

MLK's Statement on Church Destruction in Leesburg, Georgia

Thursday, August 16, 1962

In this statement following the destruction of a church in Leesburg, Georgia, Dr. King argues that it was the action of somebody with the "strange illusion" that it would somehow stop African-Americans from seeking freedom and justice.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, February 11, 1963

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Letter from Calvary Presbyterian Church to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Enclosed in this letter from Dr. John Bruere, of Calvary Baptist Church, is a magazine entitled "Faith at Work - The Magazine of Christian Experience." The featured article, "The Church That Stayed," highlights a church that has endured the deterioration, violence, and looting of the neighborhood surrounding it. The author goes on to discuss the increase in membership and their attempt to represent Christ in every situation.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.