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Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Friday, August 23, 1963

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Letter from Jan Jansen to MLK

Thursday, February 20, 1964

Jan Helgo Jansen sends a letter on the behalf of the student organizations in Norway, Denmark and Sweden, inviting Dr. King to speak in Scandinavia.

God (His Infinity)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology" on the finite and infinite.

Letter from Lloyd E. Abbey to Mr. Duncan J. Parks about Communism

Sunday, March 17, 1968

In this letter Lloyd E. Abbey reacts to an article in the Star-Gazette. Abbey asserts that "Our survival, in relation to the ideology of communism, is very questionable" and "The principle fault... ... the nine old men...," namely Dr. King, Benjamin Spock, William Coffin, Rap Brown, 'Hooligan' [Stokely] Carmichael and others. Abbey connects this to the war in Vietnam.

Democracy

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness" on the subject of democracy.

abstract needed

Friday, March 8, 1968

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.

Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jacob Broertjes

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Dora McDonald sends Jacob Broertjes a tentative schedule for Dr. King's upcoming speaking engagement in Amsterdam with the Baptist Federation.

Poor People's Campaign 1968

This is an ad and itinerary for the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

SCLC Report of the Director

This document contains a six month SCLC Semi-Annual Report. The SCLC reports on their accomplishments in the areas of social action, fundraising, education, legal defense, etc. This document discusses the Virginia Christian Leadership Conference, the SCLC Leadership Training Program, and the Citizens Voter Registration Drive. Also included is a list of recommendations for the SCLC staff.

And There Was Love

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Letter from Levi Eshkol to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Levi Eshkol, the Prime Minster of Jerusalem, welcomes Dr. King to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

This telegram forwarded by Rodney Clurman to Dr. King sends word regarding the need for transportation, food, medical supplies and water. Clurman also makes mention of a smallpox epidemic, stating that fifty million may die from the disease. He closes by encouraging the Reverend to wire him if interested in accompanying him to Scotland.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson To Mrs. Arthur Stengel

Monday, June 29, 1964

Lady Bird Johnson writes Mrs. Arthur Stengel expressing amazement at her likeness of the President. Sally Stengel was a sculptress whose likeness of Eleanor Roosevelt is permanently placed at the White House. Joseph Mermel contracted Dr. King to inquire whether he wished a similar bust of himself.

Traditionalism

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman’s “Introduction to Philosophy.”