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Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

Telegram from the SCLC Staff Wishing a Happy Birthday to MLK

The SCLC staff members wish Dr. King a happy birthday and commend his "struggle for total democracy in our nation."

Letter from MLK to Billy Fleming

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King writes Mr. Billy Fleming expressing how lovely his visit was to the Fleming-Delaine Funeral Home. Dr. King also expresses how loving the people of Clarendon County were, which he will remember forever.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Dora McDonald sends Dr. King a list of the letters, telephone calls and voice mails he received while out of the office. She also sent him information on public speaking arrangements and the publishing of books along with the royalties Dr. King would receive.

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Friday, June 28, 1963

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Sutton of his inability to speak at Drexel Institute for the 1965-1966 calendar year. At the time of writing, Dr. King was engaged in non-violent grass roots efforts throughout the South to end racial discrimination. His commitment to community issues would oftentimes force him to refuse public speaking engagements, among other requests.

Letter from Marguerite B. Pilling to Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Marguerite B. Pilling writes Dr. Abernathy to show her support of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes the Negro could actually bring the United States back to a time of decency by bringing back prayer in public schools and removing violence from TV.

Letter from Charles Harris to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Pastor Charles Harris of the Calvary Baptist Church encloses a check to Dr. King in support of the Selma to Montgomery March. He regrets his inability to participate in the march due to his wife's illness.

Rules of Procedure

Tuesday, April 19, 1955

The National Council of the Churches of Christ is a unified body of Christian faith groups. Presented here is an organized contract outlining the official rules of procedure for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Letter from Harper & Row Publishers to Joan Daves

Friday, March 10, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers representative Cass Canfield provides feedback about Dr. King's manuscript for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" to Joan Daves, Dr. King's agent. Canfield suggests replacing the last chapter of of the draft with a briefer and less expansive final section.

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Letter from Paul Stagg to MLK

Monday, April 22, 1963

Paul Stagg, Program Director of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, invites Dr. King to attend their convention along with a delegation of pastors from around the country. One of the highly anticipated sessions of the convention centers around the theme, "The Gospel in a World of Revolution."

Congratulatory Telegram to Thurgood Marshall from MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Dr. King congratulates Thurgood Marshall on being appointed to the US Supreme Court. Dr. King also emphasizes that Marshall's position is a major advancement towards a color-blind society.

Letter from John Thomas Porter to MLK

Thursday, June 28, 1962

Mr. Porter, pastor of First Baptist Institutional Church, writes to Dr. King concerning a previously discussed letter of recommendation. The letter will address a vacant pastoral position in Birmingham, Alabama.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Letter from Ragnar Forbech to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Ragnar Forbech, Chairman of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation (IFOR), responds to a previous letter from Dr. King. Dr. King declined the invitation to speak at the IFOR Conference due to of his busy schedule, but Forbech notes from their earlier correspondence that Dr. King will keep his organization in mind for the future. Forbech also congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

God is Light

Dr. King prepares a sermon entitled, "God is Light." He refers to I John 1:5 during his preparation.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, writes Dr. King regarding the Japanese edition of "Strength to Love." Kuhmoto requests a preface or message for the book and thanks Dr. King in advance for his kindness.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Letter from Ross Bass to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Ross Bass, United States Senator, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for a previous letter regarding support for the proposed elimination of the poll tax.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

MLK's Speech Notes

In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

Anonymous Letter of Support for Reverend Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

An unknown author warns Rev. Abernathy to protect himself from those who might try to harm him and other Negro civil rights leaders.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.