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Letter from W. Russell Chapman to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962

The York County, Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP sends a second invitation to Dr. King to be a guest speaker.

Letter from MLK to Debbie Steiner

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. King thanks Miss Steiner for her letter and explains how love is the way to overcome the injustices brought on by prejudice and ignorance. He writes that, though it can be difficult, she must direct her thoughts in a loving way towards those who mistreat her.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Friday, September 8, 1961

Vernon R. Byrd, a fellow Boston University graduate, invites Dr. King to Bermuda to be a speaker for Men's Day at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Telegram from MLK to Muhammad Ali

Dr. King sends a supportive telegram to Muhammad Ali. test

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1963

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Letter from Gwedolyn Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1962

Gwedolyn Johnson of Friendship Baptist invites Dr. King to a public speaking engagement held on his behalf. She encourages Dr. King to speak directly to the youth in an effort to increase moral and social activism. She requests a specific date in addition to estimated traveling costs.

Evil (Psalm)

Dr. King notes that Psalm 73 raises the question of why the wicked prosper and suggests that the only solution for the mystery of evil is faith.

Letter from Curtis W. Harris to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Curtis W. Harris demands that the United States Justice Department intervene in Virginia's school systems to prevent discrimination in how tax funds are used for public education. Mr. Harris reports that Negroes continue to be excluded from serving on local school boards and this exclusion "constitutes discrimination and is a violation of Federal law."

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

This is a financial statement for Dr. King's book "Stride Towards Freedom".

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

Letter from MLK to Heinz Ehrlick

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. Ehrlick for his encouraging letter and suggestions.

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Monroe, Mich. News, "From the Book Bag"

Monday, June 26, 1967

A review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was published by the Monroe, Michigan newspaper. The review outlined the positions Dr. King took on the Vietnam War and the Black Power movement. The author of this review considered Dr. King to be "an advocate-articulate, persistent and exhortative." Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was published and released in 1967.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. and Mrs. Jones congratulate Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. They send their regrets for not being able to attend the dinner to honor Dr. King's accomplishment.

Letter from Benjamin Newman, Jr. to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mr. Newman offers suggestions to Dr. King and Mr. Al Raby regarding voting registration in Chicago.

Greeks

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Thursday, December 27, 1962

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Letter from MLK to Senator Jennings Randolph

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to the Honorable Jenning Randolph, US Senator from West Virginia, for supporting passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962

Sarah Harvey states that the receipt of Dr. King's letter and book made her feel "very unworthy." Mrs. Harvey also makes financial a contribution.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter from Prime Minister Hugh Shearer to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967

In this letter, newly appointed Jamaican Prime Minister Hugh Shearer thanks Dr. King for his "kind congratulations." Shearer goes on to ask for prayers of success on behalf of Jamaica and its people.

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Letter from Hal Mason to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Hal Mason, campaign chairman for Choice "68, requests that Dr. King send any materials pertaining to Dr. King's potential candidacy.

Letter from Rev. John Bartos to MLK Regarding "Strength to Love"

Monday, March 1, 1965

Rev. John Bartos referenced Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in his sermon to the First Baptist Church congregation. Rev. Bartos focused on the chapter "Being a Good Neighbor," in which Dr. King discusses a story of a car accident and the discriminatory triage process that contributed to the occupants' deaths. The sermon produced questions and reactions the writer is hoping Dr. King can address.

Socialism for the Rich, Free Enterprise for the Poor

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

In a speech to the Hungry Club at the Atlanta YMCA, Rev. Andrew Young, Executive Director of the SCLC, asserts that the American economy is a system of "socialism for the rich and free enterprise for the poor," a contest between the "haves and have-nots." He claims that the space program and the Vietnam War are threats to domestic poverty programs.

Letter from MLK to George T. Raymond of the Chester, Pennsylvania NAACP

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King declines the Chester Branch of the NAACP's invitation to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.