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Letter from Jean Rand to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Jean Rand writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech regarding peace in Vietnam and sends him a monetary contribution.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

Symbols

Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Maryland (MD), New York (NY)

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.

Letter from Philip Watson to MLK

Monday, December 21, 1964
NORWAY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Mr. Watson praises Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and describes the award as a "global testimony" to Dr. King's leadership.

The Nation: Hammer of Civil Rights

Monday, March 9, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

This article by Dr. King appeared in the March 9, 1964, edition of The Nation. Dr. King discusses the impetus for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Kennedy and Johnson Administrations' commitment to the cause. Recognizing the complexity of such a political movement, King lauds the President Johnson for fighting off attempts to weaken the bill. King also recognizes the achievements of the Fair Employment Committee, established by President Kennedy and headed by then-Vice President Johnson, in providing employment opportunities for many southern Negroes.

Letter from Vivian Dilday to MLK

Friday, October 27, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday writes Dr. King on behalf of the Committee on Benevolences of The Riverside Church in New York. Enclosed with the letter is a $1,000 check for the SCLC.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

Birmingham, AL, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Board Members and Executive Staff

Friday, January 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL

Rev. Ralph Abernathy informs the board members and executive staff of SCLC that Dr. King is taking a leave of absence for two months to write his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" During Dr. King's absence, Rev. Abernathy took over the activities of the SCLC.

Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Arkansas (AR)

This document provides a detail description of Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding, a candidate for the Democratic primary in the 53rd assembly district.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

On Using Christian Words

Dr. King references Henry Nelson Wieman's book "On Using Christian Words."

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. Letter to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. is an organization dedicated to educating the youth through their distribution of scholarships. Wilson W. Woodbeck informs Dr. King that the organization will be honored to have him as an honorary member as they are entering into the third annual scholarship concert.

This is SCLC

New Orleans, LA, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

Malcolm X Trio Still Marking Time Waiting for Trial

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This article documents the legal aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X on February 21, 1965. It also discusses the three men accused of the killing and reports comments made by the lawyers involved in the case.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Letter from Andrew J. Young to Thomas A. Johnson

Tuesday, December 29, 1964
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

Andrew J. Young writes to Thomas A. Johnson regarding the SCLC annual income for the fiscal year September 1, 1963 to August 31, 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan B. Campbell

Tuesday, August 13, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Dora McDonald responds to Alan B. Campbell's recent letter to Dr. King in which he requested a copy of the sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald informs Campbell that that sermon has not been published on its own, but Dr. King recently published the book "Strength to Love," which contains that sermon among many others.

Letter from MLK to Dr. & Mrs. Bacon

Friday, October 17, 1958
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. and Mrs. Bacon for their kind donation of $200 sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

I'll Take My Stand

Washington, D.C.

Thelmore Cooper Trotman composes this poem entitled "Ill Take My Stand." The poem expresses the plight of the Negro struggle and the injustices of a case involving the rights of five Negros. Mr. Trotman elaborates on his personal health as he is of old age and explains his appreciation for Dr. King's organization.

Financial Statement for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Friday, April 8, 1955
Montgomery, AL

The Financial Committee at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church details the budget and contributions for October 1955 through March 1956.

Letter from Gerhard Amendt to MLK

New York (NY), GERMANY

Gerhard Amendt of the West German Radio Corporation expresses his interest in having Dr. King give his opinion of the Civil Rights Movement.

Document Cover Page

Monday, January 15, 1968

This document, dated January 15, 1968, from Johnson Publishing Company is a cover page titled "For Dr. King."

Letter from Martin Sizemoreto to Gentlemen

Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Martin Sizemore explains that the Madison Senior High School's Speech Department is researching a topic for their debate team and is in request for any literature that could contribute to their research.