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Letter from Mrs. Joan Kimmey to Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 12, 1968

On behalf of the Baha'is in Teaneck, New Jersey, this letter offers condolences to Mrs. King for the recent assassination of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Heartfelt sentiments express admiration for Dr. King's vision, dedication, and teachings.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild Fifth Anniversary

Sunday, February 14, 1965

This document is a cover page for the program of the Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild Fifth Anniversary. Included is a listing of Guild Officers and Ministers.

Telegram from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962

Melvin Arnold asks Dr. King to approve either "The Strength to Love" or "The Cost of Love" as the title of Dr. King's book.

Letter from Rev. John Bartos to MLK Regarding "Strength to Love"

Monday, March 1, 1965

Rev. John Bartos referenced Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in his sermon to the First Baptist Church congregation. Rev. Bartos focused on the chapter "Being a Good Neighbor," in which Dr. King discusses a story of a car accident and the discriminatory triage process that contributed to the occupants' deaths. The sermon produced questions and reactions the writer is hoping Dr. King can address.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 5, 1965

Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Outline on Aristotle

In this outline, Dr. King documents elements of Aristotelian philosophy which deal with ethics and metaphysics. The outline includes a brief biography which chronicles Aristotle's life and a reference to his well known work "Nicomachean Ethics."

Letter from Robert Friedman to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Robert Friedman, a representative of "The Forensic Quarterly," asks Dora McDonald to find out if another SCLC staff member can write an article about compulsory service systems for his publication.

Letter from MLK to Hattie Brown

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King writes Hattie Brown, President of the Women's Society at Tremont Baptist Church, expressing his deep appreciation to Reverend Ruland and the members of the Society for their financial contribution to the SCLC.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood

Monday, April 8, 1968

This is the itinerary for the Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood to Dr. King's funeral site. A group of bereaved citizens from Northeast Atlanta organized this walk to express human solidarity.

Letter to MLK from VP Hubert H. Humphrey

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This letter from Dr. King is from Vice President Humphrey and references recommendations for personnel and employment opportunities.

Philosopher (definition)

Dr. King quotes poet William Wordsworth's definition of a philosopher.

Invitation from Harry Wachtel to the Members of the Research Committee

Monday, February 26, 1968

Harry Watchel writes to the members of the research community to inivite theim to participate in a meeting called by Dr. King.

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Appeal for Brotherhood to the City of Birmingham

On behalf of the Southern Alabama Movement for Human Rights and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, C. T. Vivian writes this appeal in the "spirit of nonviolent love" to the citizens of Birmingham. His purpose is to awaken conscientiousness and gain their support in creating brotherhood and a better city.

Ross Hamilton Sends MLK Support

Thursday, November 28, 1963

Ross Hamilton, 11-years-old, writes Dr. King with support and encloses money from one of his Christmas gifts.

The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 1, 1967

In this reprint of an article originally printed in the fall of 1965, Professor Robert S. Browne makes a charge to the Department of Defense that the Negro troops were being used in Vietnam in disproportionate numbers. Freedomsways publications re-released the publication due to its remarkably fresh and informative content and high demand.

Letter from MLK to US Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King writes Stewart Udall, US Secretary of Interior, to thank him permitting the use of the Lincoln Memorial for the 100th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The event would come to be known as "The March on Washington," site of Dr. King's most famous speech.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.


Dr. King cites a quote from J. M. E. McTaggart's understanding of personality from "Studies in Hegelian Cosmology."

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

Letter from Joseph Looney to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Joseph Looney writes Dr. King inviting him to visit American College in Louvain, Belgium. Looney suggests the Reverend lead a discussion regarding the developments in the Civil Rights struggle and his role in it. Looney closes by praying that God will bless Dr. King and his family.

Letter from Sydney J. Chase to MLK

Wednesday, March 16, 1960

Mr. Chase, a political science major at Hofstra College, has reached out to Dr.King inquiring about assistance with his term paper on "non-violence as a political force."

Letter from Pauline Wren to MLK

Pauline Wren criticizes Dr. King for his endorsement of Adam Clayton Powell and asks for the immediate return of some "work" that was entrusted to Dr. King as a "minister and gentleman."

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Dr. King informs Arline Young that he has given her information to Jack O'Dell, SCLC Acting Director of Voter Registration, and Dorothy Cotton, SCLC Citizenship School Director. One of the staff members will provide her with assistance with the cause that Dr. King says "means so much to us all."