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Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding an Outstanding Balance

Wednesday, January 23, 1963

Mr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King of the new student dormitory and inquires about a donation to pay for the cost to furnish one room.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Letter from George Garabedian & Co. to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

George Garabedian writes Dr. King, pleased that he will be able to accommodate him and his group on their pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

Letter from E. P. and M. C. King to President Johnson

Saturday, July 29, 1967

The Kings write President Johnson to discuss their dissatisfaction that neither Dr. King nor Charles Evers was appointed a member of the Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder.

Jesus

Dr. King records some quotes about Jesus. He quotes a passage that describes Jesus as being the person who brought about a new trust in God. Dr. King also discusses suffering.

Man (Why He Is Sinful)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Schleiermacher (What Is Revelation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

A Letter to Meredith

Thursday, March 14, 1963

In "A Letter To Meredith" Dr. King discusses the challenges faced by James Meredith as a student at the University of Mississippi. -

Letter from Fred S. Bertsch Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965

Fred Bertsch Jr., Principal of the Holland School in Michigan, informs Dr. King that the school has made other arrangements for its commencement ceremony.

Letter from Frances L. Lucas to MLK

Monday, July 23, 1962

Frances L. Lucas writes Dr. King concerning the actions taken to end segregation in a community in Albany, Georgia. Lucas also apologizes for not responding to Dr. Kings formal letter.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

MKL At Zoin Hill - "The Ballot"

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

This transcript of a passionate, poetic, and inspiring speech touches on many of King's motifs. It starts with an appeal for voting rights, addresses the despair the audience feels from time to time, and ends with a refrain of "we shall overcome."

Letter from Rosamond C. Kay, Jr. to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Reverend Rosamond Kay, Jr. invites Dr. King to speak at Morning Star Baptist Church in Pennsylvania. He also informs Dr. King he is a 1939 graduate of Morehouse College, and their fathers are life-long friends.

Letter from MLK to Alvin Jackson

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dr. King advises Alvin Jackson to contact the NAACP Legal Defense Fund to obtain assistance.

Letter from Juniata College to MLK

Thursday, June 4, 1964

Robert E. Faus of Juniata College address Dora McDonald concerning the possibility of securing Dr. King for their religious convocation. Mr. Faus inquires about the status of Dr. King's schedule for the school year.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

Monday, January 22, 1968

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Joan Daves urges Dora McDonald to provide notice of Dr. King's public appearances to Harper so that books can be sold at those events.

The Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council Flyer

This flyer, from the Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council, announces its Annual UNCF Statewide Recognition Banquet.

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Conference on Social Statistics Resolutions

This document lists a number of solutions for improving the acknowledgement of minorities in America. These solutions were drafted during the Conference on Social Statistics held in Washington D.C.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter from Ian Robertson to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

Ian Robertson, President of the National Union of South African Students, writes Dr. King on behalf of the organization. He addresses the lack of acknowledgement to their previous letter and requests a copy and recording of Dr. King's speech.

Grand Hotel Reservation for MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

This reservation request was sent to Grand Hotel to establish accommodations for Dr. King and his associates during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies. One of the drafts of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech was scripted on Grand Hotel stationary.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.