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Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Selma, AL, New York, NY

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.

The Christian Century: Civil Rights Bill Move to Fore

Wednesday, June 5, 1957
Washington, D.C.

The Christian Century expounds on the advancement of the Civil Rights Bill in the United States. The article highlights Dr. King as a "prophetic Christian leader" and details the Negros who assembled for the March on Washington. The author lists numerous reasons correlating the positive affect of allowing Negro's the right to vote.

Letter from SGH to MLK

Montgomery, AL

SGH inquires about sending money out of the country in order to efficiently donate to Dr. King's causes.

Prayer by Dean L. Harold DeWolf at Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is a prayer by Dr. King's doctoral advisor, Dean L. Harold DeWold of Wesley Theological Seminary, given at the Civil Rights Rally on the Capitol grounds in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Donald Fletcher

Friday, November 22, 1968
Alabama (AL)

In this letter, Dr. King offers his deep gratitude to the contribution made by Donald Fletcher. He acknowledges that because of the support of the contributors, the initiatives of the SCLC can continue to flourish.

Vietnam and Beyond

New York (NY), VIETNAM

This program for the Ecumenical and Community Conference held at the Thornfield Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York, highlights leaders from across the globe invited to attend the conference. These leaders were invited to support the efforts in Vietnam and assess policies regarding the country.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

War in Vietnam Must Be Ended

Friday, December 31, 1965
Missouri (MO), VIETNAM, CUBA, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, Utah (UT), Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Marriner S. Eccles, a banker and former governor of the Federal Reserve System, urges an end to the Vietnam War, saying the U.S. is violating international law and has taken over the war to fight communism in Vietnam. He believes the billions spent on war would be more effective in preventing the spread of communism if spent on eliminating poverty and illiteracy in the developing countries.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Shattered Dreams and Unfulfilled Hopes

SPAIN

Dr. King based this sermon on unfulfilled hopes and dreams. He focused on the story of the Apostle Paul and his wish to journey to Spain. Paul did eventually go to Spain but "as a prisoner and not as a free man." Dr. King told his congregation that they all faced unfulfilled dreams at some point in their lives.

American Labor Problems

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In an assessment of American labor,Dr. King poses the question, "are we as concerned for human values and human resources as we are for material and mechanical values?" Furthermore, he declares the necessity of legislative, political, and social action to rectify such failings of American society.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Albany, GA

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Letter from Marvin Caplan of Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In a letter to the heads of various organizations, Marvin Caplan encloses information regarding the Crime Control Bill that was sent to all members of the State Judiciary Committee. The enclosure is entitled "A New Threat to School Desegregation."

Letters from Pearce Godfrey to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

Pearce Godfrey forwards to Dr. King several letters that he has written concerning his views on United States involvement in Vietnam, the usage of "under God" in the pledge of allegiance, and John F. Kennedy's statement before the United Nations that "life is unfair."

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Friday, January 25, 1985
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

Boston, MA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA)

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967
VIETNAM, Boston, MA, Chicago, IL, New Jersey (NJ), Cleveland, OH, Louisville, KY, New York, NY

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Western Union Telegram from Andrew Young to Nils J. Engelesen

NORWAY

In this telegram, Mr. Young informs Rev. Engelesen that Dr. King will accept his invitation to the reception.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Psalms 17:15, surmising that the vision of God is a mystical union with God.

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

God

Dr. King expounds on "the eternality of God" by using the Book of Psalms.

Religion and Race Memo

Friday, July 15, 1966
Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), Alabama (AL), Connecticut (CT), Texas (TX), Washington (WA), Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.

Santayana

Dr. King records George Santayana’s poem, “Oh World, Thou Choosest Not the Better Part!”

Telegram from Jeffrey Archer to MLK

Wednesday, December 2, 1964
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Jeffery Archer of Brasenose College requests a signed copy of one of Dr. King's books for the Oxfam Campaign.

Letter from Roger Loewi to MLK

New York (NY)

Roger Loewi wrote this letter to inform Dr. King of his mutual friendship with King adviser, Stanley Levison. Lastly, Mr. Loewi requested for a brief meeting with Dr. King.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967
VIETNAM, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., EGYPT, GERMANY, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, CUBA

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.