Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Des Moines, IA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mamie Reese

Monday, January 22, 1968
Albany, GA

Dr. King's assistant writes Mamie Reese to applaud Eartha Kitt's courage in speaking up about what she believes is the cause of “restlessness” and crime in the streets. Kitt spoke out against the Vietnam War at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, San Francisco, CA

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Friday, February 19, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

Letter from Ben Selsby to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Ben Selsby writes Dr. King in support of his stand on the Vietnam War and answers the critics by increasing his SCLC contribution.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Tuesday, June 28, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Shaefer that Dr. King will be able to speak in Kennett Square in Pennsylvania.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Sacrifice

Dr. King interprets Proverbs 21:3 to mean that God wants righteousness and justice not burnt offerings.

Letter to MLK Regarding Support and Donation

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

A New York couple and their 9 year old son, mailed Dr. King this get well letter praying for his recovery and saluting him for his work.

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), VIETNAM, SPAIN

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

Crusade for Citizenship Memorandum

Tuesday, February 4, 1958
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King creates an outline that entails the purpose and goals for the Crusade for Citizenship. Dr. King will deliver this information in a mass meeting to clarify the aims of the SCLC's "crusade." The dual purpose for this sector of the SCLC is to increase the number of Negro voters and to liberate all Southerners. Dr. King further elaborates on the intricacies of the movement.

Letter from Thomas K. Gilhool to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

The Fellowship House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania invites Dr. King to be a speaker at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney for her 35 years of service as Director.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Mr. & Mrs. Silverboard

Thursday, January 9, 1969
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King forwarded this telegram to the Silverboard family of Atlanta, Georgia, in 1969. She wanted to convey sympathy for the death of their father and hoped that the family would find comfort. The spiritual bond of love, according to Mrs. King, is a mechanism that unites families during times of sorrow.

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Thursday, April 5, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

Sunday, April 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966
Chicago, IL

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

Birmingham, AL

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

Letter from MLK to Senator Edward V. Long

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Senator Long's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter of Condolence from Anny Elston

Saturday, April 6, 1968
New York (NY)

73 year old widow Amy Elston, who makes contributions sparingly to the SCLC, is deeply impacted in her philanthropy in the wake of Dr. King's death and decides to send this letter, along with a contribution, to the SCLC to show her support in the advancement of the actualization of Dr. King's dreams.

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

Telephone Log: January 22

Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

This memo from the desk of Dr. King includes several missed telephone calls noted for his later response.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

VIETNAM, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CHINA

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Thursday, October 14, 1965
FRANCE, PUERTO RICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Hayward sends Dr. King a brief note on what has been keeping him so busy and hopes that while Dr. King is in Pars, they will be able to meet.

Letter from MLK to Broadway United about a Contribution

Monday, January 15, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter Dr. Offers his gratitude to the Broadway United for a contribution. Dr. King also comments on how such funds are used and why such funds are needed.

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

Thursday, August 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Chicago Staff

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
Chicago, IL

Tom Offenburger writes to the SCLC Chicago Office Staff Steering Committee concerning phone call procedures. Offenburger asserts that answering the phone with "Operation Breadbasket" will not reveal the broader interest of the SCLC, and suggests answering the phone with, "good morning, SCLC."

Forgiveness and Repentance

Dr. King reviews a passage from the Book of Ezekiel regarding forgiveness and repentance. Summarizing the verse, he states that repentance involves an "actual change of attitude" and forgiveness includes forgetting past mistakes.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA)

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.