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Letter from MLK to Dr. Milnor Alexander

Friday, November 6, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the kick-off celebration for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 50th Anniversary. A previous engagement in another section of the country prevents Dr. King from accepting. However, Dr. King would later speak for the organization in Philadelphia. Coretta Scott King was a key member and sponsor of the league.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966
Nevada (NV), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.

Letter from Katherine Camp to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Katherine L. Camp, Chairman for the Fiftieth Anniverdary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dora McDonald regarding plans for Dr. King's address at the banquet. Mrs. Coretta Scott King is listed as one of the sponsors for the event.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Tuesday, October 22, 1963
SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, ZAMBIA, SOUTH AFRICA

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Letter from Marjorie Heins to MLK and Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 14, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Marjorie Heins informs the SCLC that the Campaign for Disarmament, a peace group in Germany, requests for Dr. King to give 5-10 lectures for about 2,000 - 3,000 people.

Letter from MLK to Prisoner James C. Guyton

Wednesday, January 24, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King sends his prayers to Mr. Guyton in his confinement and informs him that he will contact him when he has additional information.

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

New York, NY, Chicago, IL

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

INDIA

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.

Letter from National Press Club to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

A representative from the National Press Club (Washington, D.C.) writes to Dr. King, asking him to review and correct any inaccuracies in a transcription from a Q & A that took place at the Press Club.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson about Howard Address

Monday, June 7, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson expressing appreciation and admiration for his speech at the Howard University Commencement.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Letter from Charles Daly to Dr. King

Sunday, April 10, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Charles Daly is attaching an article from the 1966 issue of the University of Chicago Magazine that he thought would be of interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Chicago Freedom Fund Festival

Chicago, IL, Little Rock, AR, Nashville, TN, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

The Chicago Freedom Fund Festival, organized by Mahalia Jackson, served as a benefit for the SCLC.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The assistant director for the Office of Community Educational Service at Emory University invites Dr. King to appear on a local television program. She informs Dr. King that the program will feature influential leaders from the South and consist of a 30-minute interview by an Emory faculty member. In closing, she asks Dr. King to commit to a date between March 19 and April 16, 1963.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jessie Stephens

Wednesday, September 16, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Miss McDonald informs Jessie Stephens that Dr. King is out of the country, but she recommends that Mrs. Stephens contact Dr. King's lawyer, Chauncey Eskridge, for help.

Letter from William Mallory to MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mr. Mallory writes to Dr. King proposing a national day to be observed by all Negroes. The three purposes of this day are to instill racial pride, demonstrate the contributions of Negroes and to preserve the heritage of American Negroes.

Letter from the South African Consulate

Friday, February 11, 1966
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The South African Consulate-General informs Dr. King that his application for a visa to enter South Africa is being taken into consideration. He informs Dr. King that he would be informed shortly of the decision regarding his request.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

Monday, September 26, 1966
California (CA)

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crosby to MLK

Sunday, March 8, 1964
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA

The Crosby family of Massachusetts encloses a check to Dr. King to aid in the fight for equality. Mrs. Crosby notes that her husband was the first individual to employ a Negro teacher at Boston University, where Dr. King received his PhD in systematic theology.

Letter from Jane Dahlberg to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

New York University Dean Jane Dahlberg congratulates Dr. King for taking a noble position against the Vietnam War. As a result of his participation in the New York anti-war demonstration, Dahlberg believes that his example of nonviolence was highly emphasized during the march.

Letter to MLK from John Yeck

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Yeck asks Dr. King to think about the connotations of the words "black" and "Negro." He feels that the word "black" contains a separating connotation, and the word "Negro" a unifying one.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963
Massachusetts (MA)

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), DENMARK

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Telegram from Charles Morris to MLK

Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL

Mr. Morris, president of The Negro Business and Industrial Association, extends an invitation to Dr. King to participate in an initiative designed to combat the rioting in Negro communities.

Letter from MLK to J. Frank Patch

Friday, May 13, 1966
CANADA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King declines to accept J. Frank Patch's invitation to attend the conference sponsored by the Baptist Union of Western Canada due to prior commitments in the United States.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Letter from Saifuddin Ahmed to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966
PAKISTAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Saifuddin Ahmed writes on behalf of the East Pakistan Student Union inviting Dr. King to speak at their 10th Provincial Conference. The students also express their admiration for Dr. King's dedication and leadership to human rights worldwide.