Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Detroit, MI"

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
NIGERIA

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Dallas, TX

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA

Martha Kennedy thanks Dr. King for sending her a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Kennedy feels that Dr. King's leadership is well emphasized in the context of the book. Particularly, she finds the chapter on Black Power to be "valuable." Mrs. Kennedy hopes for much success to Dr. King and his great work.

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

The Negro Heritage Library

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), BURUNDI, CAMEROON, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, CHAD, CONGO / ZAIRE, ETHIOPIA, GABON, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, Co'te D'IVOIRE / IVORY COAST, KENYA, LIBERIA, MALAWI, MALI, NIGER, NIGERIA, RWANDA, SENEGAL, SIERRA LEONE, TOGO, UGANDA, ZAMBIA

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from Anonymous Writer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE), ITALY, POLAND, SPAIN, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

The author of this letter copies an article "Communists Meet the Church," published by the San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, to support his accusations of cooperation between the Catholic Church and Communists.

Typical Theistic Personalism

Dr. King sketches notes on theistic personalism with references to Friedrich Leibniz, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, and Hermann Lotze.

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

Letter from Dr. Neil V. Sullivan to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Berkeley, CA

Dr. Neil Sullivan requests that Dr. King write the foreword for his new book, "Set Our Children Free -- In Integrated Schools."

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY

This is a debit memo for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, March 4, 1968
Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

Telegram from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman Guyot to MLK

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party Chairman expresses concern regarding the SCLC's exclusion of "indigenous people of various political orientation in preparing the program" for the annual convention held in Jackson, MS.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Letter from Ms. Katherine Livermore to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968
Texas (TX), KENYA, UGANDA

Ms. Livermore criticizes Dr. King for his alleged association with the Communist Party. She also makes several historical and contextual references to slavery and the current plight of the Negro race. She concludes with a warning, "be careful this summer."

Letter from Stanley Becker to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
New York, NY

Stanley Becker, the principal at the Amsterdam School in New York, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding Roosevelt Day Address on "Peace"

Friday, January 25, 1952

Here in this notecard, Dr. King provides a quote from the Roosevelt Day address concerning peace, on January 25, 1952.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Maryland (MD), New York (NY)

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

The Freedom Movement and the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 1, 1967
New York (NY)

In this reprint of an article originally printed in the fall of 1965, Professor Robert S. Browne makes a charge to the Department of Defense that the Negro troops were being used in Vietnam in disproportionate numbers. Freedomsways publications re-released the publication due to its remarkably fresh and informative content and high demand.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967
Nashville, TN, VIETNAM

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

An Edition of the SCLC Newsletter

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

This April/May 1964 SCLC newsletter highlights the recent accomplishments of the SCLC and its members. Some of the topics discussed are the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Ben Hooks' recent judicial appointment, and Dr. King being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962
INDIA, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Hawaii (HI), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Letter to Ruth D. Beyer from Dorothy Gaines

Thursday, July 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dorothy Gaines provides Ruth D. Beyer with the address of the Montgomery Improvement Association due to the possibility of a check lost in the mail.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to John H. Bustamente

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Chauncey Eskridge elaborates on the financial details associated with the Belafonte Benefit Concerts. He also requests some help in overcoming the deficit created by the concert.

A Contentious Telephone Message

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

Texas (TX)

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.