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Letter from E. H. Singmaster to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

E.H. Singmaster informs Dr. King that they should "hang together" and not separate in war and peace. He advocates that those involved in the military are "improved," regardless of color or gender.

Letter to MLK from the Lutheran Standard Regarding Publishing

In this letter, George H. Muedeking, the editor of The Lutheran Standard, inquires if his publication can publish an advertisement of Dr. King's that was in The New York Times.

Letter to S. R. Wise from MLK Regarding Anti-Semitism

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dr. King responds to a telegram inquiry about SCLC and anti-semitism. Dr. King continues on at length about Negro-Jewish relations, excerpting from his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from the American Committee on Africa Regarding South Africa's Participation in the Olympics

Thursday, January 11, 1968

George M. Houser, Executive Director of the American Committee on Africa, informs readers of the International Olympic Committee's upcoming meeting that will discuss the 1968 Olympics. Mr. Houser encloses a paper regarding the history of South Africa and the Olympics to help urge the committee to reconsider granting South Africa permission to participate in the Olympics.

Letter from Robert Friedman to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Robert Friedman, a representative of "The Forensic Quarterly," asks Dora McDonald to find out if another SCLC staff member can write an article about compulsory service systems for his publication.

Resolution of the SCLC Board Regarding Vietnam

Thursday, August 11, 1966

This resolution of the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, outlines the effects of the expansion of the Vietnam War and recommends future action steps for the administration of the organization.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy expresses appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to give an oral history interview for the JFK Library.

Centennial Edition of The Nation

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

James J. Storrow, Jr., Publisher of The Nation, invites Dr. King to advertise in its 100th anniversary edition. Storrow suggests that Dr. King could write an article on SCLC's achievements and services to the community within the advertisement.

Letter of Support from Lars Sodersten to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

Lars Sodersten offers support to the civil rights movement on behalf of concerned Swedish residents. He also informed Dr. King of his plans to raise money for SCLC and the movement.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to John Lewis of SNCC

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Ralph D. Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary-Treasurer of the SCLC, sends a check as a gift to John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC. Abernathy also informs Lewis of the SCLC's financial situation, which prevents the organization from making a loan to SNCC.

Telegram from MLK to Richard Maguire of the DNC

Dr. King informs Richard Maguire of the Democratic National Committee that he is unable to accept an invitation to the pre-inaugural dinner.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Robert Kennedy writes to Dr. King to express his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the strive to preserve the basic values of freedom and dignity throughout the world. Lastly, Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a series of speeches he made in January and wish to hear Dr. King's reactions to them.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Letter from Norman Taylor to MLK

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Norman Taylor, an agent at Investment Bonds, Inc., commends Dr. King on his work and for being a man of integrity. He offers assistance to help improve the living conditions of the poor in the slums of Chicago.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Letter from E. P. and M. C. King to President Johnson

Saturday, July 29, 1967

The Kings write President Johnson to discuss their dissatisfaction that neither Dr. King nor Charles Evers was appointed a member of the Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder.

Letter from John A. Blatnik to MLK

Thursday, February 27, 1964

John A. Blatnik, Chair of the Democratic Study Group, writes Dr. King thanking him for his recent letter indicating his support for Blatnik's position on civil rights.

Letter to Mrs. King from Rev. and Mrs. Joseph L. Roberts

Thursday, April 11, 1968

In this heartfelt correspondence to Mrs. King, Rev. Joseph Roberts, President Elder of the West Detroit District for the AME Church, expressed sympathy for the death of Dr. King. In the letter, he acknowledges the enclosure of the hard copy of his spoken tribute to Dr. King. Seven years later, in 1975, Rev. Roberts would succeed Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., as the fourth pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Joan Daves requests confirmation of a possible press conference, subsequent luncheon, and speaking engagement made by Dr. King. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from MLK to Willie Faust

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from Willie Gate Faust regarding an inquiry pertaining to legal advice and his release from jail. Reverend King refers the inmate to Attorney Donald Lee Hollowell, counsel for the NAACP.

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Letter from Sidney Eisenberger to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1961

Sidney Eisenberger sends a donation and words of encouragement to Dr. King. He praises Dr. King's work, particularly the focus on political involvement. He humorously writes that he hopes that he will one day be so unconscious of color that he will "feel free to regard a negro auto driver with the same venomous hatred I give to white drivers."

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Letter from Ann B. Houston to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

In this letter Ann B. Houston of the American Friends Service Committee offers her gratitude for a contribution received from the Benevolence Club of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She further states that the funds have gone to good use in South Vietnam towards the manufacture of artificial limbs using local immigrated labor.

Letter from Gunter Kohlhaw to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. Gunter B. Kohlhaw shares the memorable experience of hearing Dr. King deliver a sermon while attending Sunday service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Kohlhaw also requests copies of Dr. King's collection of sermons.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the weakness of "non theistic humanism."