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Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, July 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

Meeting of Action Committee

Friday, March 22, 1968

Dr. King sends a meeting notice to members of the SCLC Action Committee. He also includes a list of reports to be prepared concerning the Washington Mobilization.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Carolyn W. Ferriday

Wednesday, July 20, 1966

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Carolyn Ferriday for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

This pamphlet provides information regarding the history, purpose and plans for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace.

Nature of Religion

Dr. King indicates Schleiermacher's view on the nature of religion.

Letter to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

In this letter, the author suggests that the marchers of the Poor Peoples March should make a surprise visit to the estates of Senator Robert and Edward Kennedy during the historic event.

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Letter from Donald Lincoln Cook to MLK

Monday, January 24, 1966

Donald Cook lauds Dr. King's efforts to persuade military forces to leave Vietnam. In response to a speech on Vietnam given by Dr. King, Cook agrees that "the Negro should have special interest in the plight of the Vietnamese." He further encourages Dr. King to stand firm in his position to bring a moral conscience to the nation.

Library Book Due Date Card

This document is a ledger that contains a due date for an over night loan.

Barth

Dr. King notes Karl Barth's views on Jesus.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Letter from T.J. Morrow to MLK

Monday, July 5, 1965

T.J. Morrow writes Dr. King in an effort to gain support for his film idea. Having already submitted it to a motion picture company and subsequently denied, Morrow hopes that King can help with promotion. He believes the film can offer positive messages of brotherhood and feels confident in its impact on society.

Christian Social Philosophy II

An outline briefly explains T.S. Eliot's opinion on culture and how it pertains to religion, specifically Christianity. Notes taken on the side of the outline insinuate that Western culture is beginning to disintegrate because the values it was built on are decreasing in importance.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

Letter from Arthur Jordan to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Arthur Jordan, General Secretary of St. Thomas Young Men's Christian Association in St. Thomas, Ontario, invites Dr. King to speak at a lecture engagement in Canada.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter requests the help of Dr. King in dealing with the Principal of W. J. Creel School, who is allegedly a racist and uses racial slurs against his students.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Outline for Why Does History Move?

Dr. King's sermon outline references Hegel and Marx in relation to questions surrounding the concept of history.

Letter from Berry Gordy to Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, July 18, 1963

Mr. Gordy writes to Mr. Walker to negotiate album production and royalty rates for Dr. King's speeches.

Letter From Andrew Young to Chris Folcker

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

In this letter, Andrew Young thanks Chris Folcker for his work with the Martin Luther King Fund, the Europe-wide fundraising campaign on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Dr. King. Young praises the "tremendous success" of the fund.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Power Black or White and Christian Conscience

Monday, August 1, 1966

This document is an enclosure that belongs with a letter from Gayrund Wilmore, Isaiah Pogue, Leroy Patrick, Elder Hawkins, and Bryant George to MLK. The writers seek to raise the conscientiousness of Christians in both the black and white communities, and address an existing dilemma between race and power with the hope of bringing about reconciliation.

Letter from MLK to First Prebysterian Church Regarding Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King personally thanks Jordan and First Presbyterian Church for their contribution to SCLC. Dr. King states, "I know that you cannot enjoy the experience of change as we who see it first hand everyday, but I trust that these fews words will convey our appreciation and gratitude."

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King

This royalty statement for the period of January 1, 1964 to December 31, 1964 is for the Dutch-language edition of "Strength to Love," published by Van Loghum Slaterus.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Letter from James W. Sheaffer to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

James Sheaffer, of Lycoming College's Department of Music, invites Dr. King to return to the college for another visit. Sheaffer also offers to arrange fundraising opportunities for the SCLC.

Redwood City, CA Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 1967

At the bottom of this clipping, from the Redwood City, California Tribune, is a brief update on the release of Dr. King's final book. The book entitled: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", according to the tribune, anticipated that it would be a very must-read publication.