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Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Sworn Deposition of MLK

Monday, December 10, 1956

Dr. King records an event that happened on a train between Nashville and Montgomery, during which a policeman denied him access to the general waiting room.

Letter from Mount Olive Baptist Church to the SCLC

Saturday, October 5, 1963

The Mount Olive Baptist Church of Sharpsburg express their appreciation and support of the SCLC's nonviolent movement. The church encloses a check and hopes that the organization will maintain clarity in the progression of a "true democracy."

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Letter from Kenneth Opp to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Kenneth Opp requests information from Dr. King relating to the Time Magazine 'Choice 68' initiative.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Telegram from the Bailey Family to Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958

The Bailey family welcomes Dr. King home.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Letter from Calhoun Geiger to MLK

Friday, April 26, 1963

Calhoun Geiger, director of the Peace Education Program, invites Dr. King and his family to a summer family camp hosted by the American Friends Service Committee, Inc. Geiger explains that John Yungblut suggested that Dr. King might be interested in attending.

Accepting the New York City Medallion Draft

Dr. King accepts the New York City Medallion on behalf of all persons, both black and white, involved in the fight for social justice and equality.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Thomson, a representative of the Canadian Friends' Service Committee, invites Dr. King to participate in a week-long conference held in Toronto, Ontario. The event will consist of diplomats from all over the world.

Letter to Mr. Wilkinson from Dr. Schrade

Monday, May 3, 1965

Dr. Schrade asks Mr. Wilkinson in the NAACP office in New York to pass on a request for Dr. King to write an article for his magazine. Previous Nobel Prize winners have submitted an autograph photo and a short biography to the magazine. In additional to the requested article, Dr. Schrade hopes Dr. King will do the same.

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.

Leibnitz's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert C. Knudson's "Doctrine of Redemption."

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to John H. Calhoun

Dr. and Mrs. King deliver their condolences for the recent passing of Mason, brother of John H. Calhoun. The Kings informs Mr. Calhoun that he is not alone in his hour of mourning and that the community is also suffering this great loss.

Report of A Participant

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

Letter from MLK to Gaynette Henderson

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. King regretfully informs Gaynette Henderson that he will be unable to visit the sorority suite of Delta Sigma Theta during his visit to Pennsylvania State University.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from MLK to Steve Rubicz

Friday, October 5, 1962

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Steve Rubicz to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation to speak at the University of Washington. Dr. King regretfully declines due to several speaking engagements on his schedule keeping him from accepting additional commitments.

Answers in the American Way

Monday, March 25, 1968

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Ralph Abernathy sends best wishes to Dr. King and everyone affiliated with the Civil Rights Movement. Rev. Abernathy is disheartened because he is not present to assist with the movement, but assures Dr. King that he wants to be an active participant.

Letter from MLK to Linda Houser

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King writes this letter to Linda Houser of Ursulin Academy regarding the studies that cultivated her involvement in the "struggle for social justice in America."

Letter from Activist Carl Brannin to MLK

Sunday, January 6, 1963

Social reformer and journalist Carl Brannin commends Dr. King's recent speech in Dallas. Brannin also discusses the importance of the Negro community voting in all elections and reports his experience as a poll tax deputy. He expresses frustration at recent elections that would have had different outcomes if the Negro vote had been strong and united.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.