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"Detroit, MI"

Letter from MLK to Philip Lubliner

Wednesday, August 23, 1961

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lubliner's support during the "freedom struggle in the South."

Letter from Morton M. Brooks to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Morton Brooks writes Dr. King to check his availability for April, May, or June of 1965 to speak at Mt. Zion's Sunday morning church service. Brooks expresses that he is aware of Dr. King's busy schedule, but would appreciate his consideration.

Letter from Congressman William Ryan to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman William Ryan gives Dr. King an update regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act that is still under debate in Congress. Ryan, a staunch supporter of the bill, mentions his persistent efforts to keep the legislation from being blocked by adversaries.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Handwritten Notes on Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sin. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Monday, July 27, 1964

Presented here, is a draft of an article published in the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC Newsletter. The article highlights the discontentment of the author in relation to acts of violence against Jewish citizens.

Aristotle's Psy

Dr. King writes about Aristotle's views on the soul.

Letter from MLK to Marcia Burke

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

Dr. King appreciates the invitation extended to him to speak for the Ohio Wesleyan University Student Committee on Race Relations, but must decline it.

Letter from Larry Schneider to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

Larry Schneider informs Dr. King that he is available for assistance with "planning and implementing" Dr. King's efforts. He also offers his thoughts on a wide variety of issues affecting the American Negro.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from Irmgard Svenson

Monday, August 14, 1967

Irmgard Svenson requests that Dr. King send copies of his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card

Frank and Ann Smallwood enclose their annual membership fees for the SCLC. The Smallwoods express that they know Dr. King will experience financial difficulties because of his stand on the Vietnam War and they wish they could contribute more.

Letter from Victor Carter to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Victor Carter writes a letter of support to Dr. King on behalf of he and his wife. The Carters are unable to attend the Selma to Montgomery march but enclose a check to aid in the civil right struggle.

Letter to Senator Robert Kennedy from MLK

Wednesday, March 2, 1966

Dr. King applauds Senator Robert Kennedy for his statement on Vietnam. Both Robert Kennedy and former President John F.Kennedy contributed to the overall political philosophy and concept of a world of diversity. In addition, Dr. King mentions several political entities of progression due to the intellect and partnership with Senator Kennedy.

Letter from Vivian Cintron to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vivian Cintron, who is a student, offers her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

The Denver Post Reprint "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shaby Clothes"

Thursday, January 25, 1962

In this reprint, of the Denver Post article, entitled "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shabby Clothes", the reader learns that a 13 year old boy did not go to school because he was ashamed by his clothes. The Colorado judge responded with an attempt to get the boy new clothes and reinstated in school.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 31, 1962

The Gandhi Society for Human Rights lists the names of individuals whom they would like to serve on the organization's Board of Directors in which Dr. King serves as the Honorary President.

Telegram from F. M. Horton to MLK

F. M. Horton relays Norwegian ambassador True Davis' congratulations to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Cheryl Chambers to MLK

Thursday, November 28, 1963

Cheryl Chambers asks Dr. King to send an autographed picture and a copy of his Letter from Birmingham Jail. She is doing a paper on civil rights for her government project and requests any available literature. Ms. Chambers, who is also a member of the NAACP Youth Council, informs Dr. King that the Council is getting ready to begin their membership drive and inquires if he has any helpful suggestions.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Monday, October 11, 1965

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethel Sebastian

Friday, September 21, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Sebastian that Dr. King will make inquiries about her father when he returns to Albany and hopes the two will reunite soon.

Itinerary for MLK

In this correspondence, a list of "appearances" for Dr. King is listed.

Articles Regarding Operation Breadbasket

These two articles from the Chicago Daily News and The Washington Post, discuss the economic improvement of Negroes in Chicago, IL.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1967

In this document, Dr. King receives a royalty check from J. Campe for the use of A Stone of Hope in a work entitled "This Nation." The amount of the check is 13.50.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick

Monday, May 17, 1965

Andrew Young instructs Dora McDonald to respond to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick's invitation to Dr. King. Ms. McDonald affirms Dr. King's arrival date and informs Mr. Kirkpatrick that they must accommodate the cost expense for two. She asserts that it is necessary for Dr. King to travel with at least one of his aides.

The American Dream

Sunday, February 10, 1963

This document contains the text of an address that Dr. King gave at Plymouth Church of The Pilgrims in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King describes the steps that should be taken in order to make the American Dream a reality.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, April 17, 1967

J.Campe encloses payment from The Critic for "Where Do We Go From Here" permission fees.