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Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Letter from Clark Foreman to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Clark Foreman, Director of the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Foreman also asks Dr. King to send a message of congratulations to Dr. James A. Dombrowski, who will receive the Tom Paine Award at the 1964 Bill of Rights Dinner. Dombrowski, a Methodist minister, was co-founder of the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Memo from Stroy Freeman to Englewood Clergy

In this memo, Stroy Freeman informs the Englewood Clergy of Dr. King's attendance for the "withdrawal of accounts campaign" from Chicago City Bank.

Harper & Row, Publishers' Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom

Monday, December 31, 1962

This document, dated in December of 1962, shows a statement of Dr. King's royalties from his first published book, Stride Toward Freedom. Notice that the retail price for the book was in the amount of $2.95. Harper & Row was the company that formulated the publication.

Telegram from Arrowsmith to MLK

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Arrowsmith issues a telegram inquiring about Dr. King's potential visit to the country of Australia.

Letter from Maurice Mitchell to Neil Sullivan

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Mr. Mitchell discusses fundraising for SCLC's Chicago literacy project. HEW recently withdrew their support of the project, but Mitchell is optimistic about potential support from foundations and major donors.

Telegram from George M. Houser to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

In this telegram, dated April 12, 1966, Mr. Houser requests Dr. King's help in leading a march on First National Bank of New York. Due to bank loans to South Africa, several hundred students are showing support by withdrawing their accounts.

Letter from Great St. Mary's

Monday, January 18, 1965

Hugh Montefiore informs Dr. King that he is awaiting a response to an earlier letter. Montefiore had hoped that Dr. King could preach in an effort to "fix up" some local ministers.

Letter to MLK from the Peace Research Institute

Saturday, November 28, 1964

The Peace Research Institute of Oslo congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and further expresses their interest of having Dr. King speak at a seminar on nonviolence. The institute is starting a research project on nonviolence with a focus on observing inter-group conflicts.

Letter from Mary Brown to MLK

Sunday, October 31, 1965

Mary Brown, a student at Seward Park High School, asks for Dr. King's assistance in her presentation of a discussion on the challenges of the "Civil Rights workers."

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Hans Massaquoi

In this telegram, Dora McDonald writes to Mr. Massaquoi from Ebony Magazine, informing him that Dr. King is not left handed.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

Letter from President of Yugoslav Baptist Union to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

The President of the Yugoslav Baptist Union writes excitedly as he finds out Dr. King will be in his country. He requests that Dr. King stop by the church or his home during his short visit.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. Baum

Monday, February 28, 1966

Dora McDonald writes H. Baum requesting that he relay to Monica Wilson that Dr. King has accepted her invitation to speak at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.


Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Telegram to MLK from Kjell Eide

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Kjell Eide requests Dr. King's participation in a peace delegation regarding the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Leslie Cohen to MLK

Leslie Cohen informs Dr. King that Miss Egnal's eighth grade classes from Great Neck South Junior High School in New York have each elected him their "Man of the Year" over all other world leaders.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Letter from Apuyva J. Mehta to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Written on the day of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, Mehta requests Dr. King's autograph.

My Dream: Julian Bond and the Constitution by MLK

Saturday, January 22, 1966

Dr. King elaborates on the "hypocritical" and "high-handed injustice" executed by the United States and their refusal to seat Julian Bond for the Georgia State Legislature. Abraham Lincoln is highlighted for his exercise of the democratic right in his stance against Congress involving the United States war with Mexico. Dr. King asserts the irony in the method of Mr. Bond's colleagues and critics whom either indirectly or directly supported racial segregation. Dr.

Draft Letter from MLK to Ms. Giunier

Dr. King responds to an offer of assistance from a supporter. He directs her to the New York office to jumpstart her work and commends her for her interest in the Freedom Movement.

Day of the Lord

Dr. King writes about the "Day of the Lord," as mentioned in the Old Testament book, Zephaniah.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Joan Daves contacts Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, regarding the payment from the Canadian Broadcasting series in the amount of $5,000. Daves further discusses the galley of lectures that are to be checked and released by Dr. King for publication in Canada. In addition to Dr. King, Stanley Levison will also be reviewing the galleys.

Letter from MLK to E. H. Lehman

Dr. King expresses concern regarding the illegal seating of elected representatives from Mississippi.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Letter from Oxford JACARI to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964

Frank R. Parker, Vice-Chairman of the Oxford Joint Action Committee Against Racial Intolerance (JACARI) extends yet another speaking invitation to Dr. King, emphasizing his eagerness to hear the message of non-violent resistance.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."