The Archive

Search results for:

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962

Benjamin E. Mays offers celebratory wishes to Dr. King on the sixth anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conferece. Mays offers words of support and encouragement for the great work Dr. King has done in the fight for equality and justice.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Silas Norman of SNCC

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Silas Norman of SNCC to explain that Dr. King is currently touring several cities on the People-to-People tour and will be presiding over the SCLC convention. She informs him that his letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Arvid Svard to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

Arvid Svard asks Dr. King to provide an introduction for an article Svard is writing for the Swedish Baptist Press, which will highlight Dr. King's work. Svard also requests pictures for use in the Swedish edition of "Strength to Love."

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

Maurice Dawkins, Assistant Director for Civil Rights of the Office of Economic Opportunity, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting aimed at funding summer projects for riot-prone cities. Mr. Dawkins has already encouraged President Johnson to help fund $75 million for summer programs.

Letter from Walter Jackson to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965

Walter Jackson of Lincoln School in Berkley, California writes Dr. King extending his gratitude for the Reverend's efforts in Civil Rights.

Proposed Agenda of Board Meeting

This document is a draft of an outline for the proposed agenda of an SCLC board meeting.

Desegregation and the Future

Saturday, December 15, 1956

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Invitation from Frederick S. Wallin to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963

Frederick E. Wallin invites Dr. King to speak at the Alderson-Broaddus College's Civic Interest Week, a weeklong study and discussion on political and economic concerns. He explains that he is inviting the most controversy speakers would seriously appreciated Dr. King's attendance.


Dr. King describes the theology of Unitarianism as being a contrast to Trinitarianism.

Telegram from MLK to Katie B. Whickham

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Dr. King welcomes Mrs. Whickham and the National Beauty Culturist League to Atlanta. He also thanks Mrs. Whickham for the support that her organizations has given to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

Letter from Pastor Paul S. Barru to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965

The pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs, Colorado sends the SCLC a contribution on behalf of his church and the Denver Christian Center. He references a recent Wilcox County, Alabama tour which he feels reflects the type of "creative" activity that is most beneficial for exposing "a window into the rural South for the ignorant North."

Letter from I.M. Sternberg to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965

I.M. Sternberg, Western Electric Public Affairs Representative, poses four questions regarding the social conditions of Blacks. Sternberg requests feedback from Dr. King in order to raise awareness and to promote social justice activism among company employees.

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

The Martin Luther King Column (2)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Mary Bonaventure

The author writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy to express how impressed she was with the events surrounding Dr. King's funeral. She also made a lengthy request for mementos of the funeral service and Dr. King's speeches.

Card from Sophia Anderson to MLK

Mrs. Sophia Anderson wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery.

Letter from Robert Nelson to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Robert R. Nelson notifies Dr. King of the recent invitation that was first extended by Mr. Wendell English on behalf of the Impact Committee at Marshall University. Mr. Nelson requests Dr. King to participate as a key note speaker at one of the events. Impact is a morality driven organization focused on the proper guidance and purpose of life.

Letter from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, March 21, 1962

The McKeesport Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker at its upcoming Human Rights Dinner.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Monday, November 14, 1966

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

Letter from Stewart Udall to MLK

Secretary Udall grants permission to the SCLC to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation at the Lincoln Memorial.

Letter to the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty from Richard W. Boone

Monday, August 29, 1966

Richard W. Boone provides the officers and vice chairmen of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty with the forthcoming meeting dates and attendance card.

Letter from John Frankel to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

John Frankel expresses gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of Sargent Shriver for supporting the efforts of the Queens Clinical Society in South Jamaica.

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC Proposal for Recruiting "Grass Root" Delegates

Monday, June 12, 1967

This document contains a proposal for recruiting 1,745 "grass root" delegates to the SCLC's 1967 Annual Convention. Also included is a desired amount of delegates from southern states, a proposed list of meeting places, and a budget for recruiting the delegates.