Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"EGYPT"

Letter from a "White Power Militant"

A disgruntled writer criticizes leadership in the civil rights movement.

God

Dr. King elaborates on Thomas Aquinas' views on the existence of God.

A Knock at Midnight

Dr. King wrote this sermon for the Youth Sunday Services of the Women's Convention Auxiliary National Baptist Convention in Chicago on September 14, 1958. The sermon builds off of a biblical passage from Luke in which a friend visits a neighbor at midnight for three loaves of bread. Correlating the story to the modern world, Dr.

Telegram from MLK to Nicholas Biddle

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King apologizes to Nicholas Biddle for being unable to attend the testimonial for Senator Jacob Javits.

Letter from Floyd Haynes to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Floyd Haynes, Editor of the black-owned "Buckeye Review," invites Dr. King to speak at a civic forum. The event is a joint effort of the newspaper and the Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship of Youngstown, Ohio. Haynes also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from the Saskatchewan Teachers Federation to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964

The Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, a Canadian organization, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Federation extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker, which will involve meetings in four to five cities. The year of 1965 is the "golden jubilee year" and their desire to have an extraordinary individual as their guest speaker.

Letter from R. D. Earnhardt to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

R.D. Earnhardt requests a meeting with Rev. Abernathy to discuss Dr. King's death and the plan to proceed with the "Poor People's March on Washington, DC.

Thirty-nine Articles

Dr. King writes notes regarding the "basic doctrinal formula of the Anglican Church."

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Letter from MLK to W. Russell Chapman of the NAACP

Thursday, February 1, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the York County NAACP.

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Hugh Morrow

Monday, June 25, 1962

Wyatt Tee Walker writes to Hugh Morrow expressing his grievance for the attack of Governor Rockefeller.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Letter from Richard W. Boone

Saturday, October 29, 1966

The Child Development Group of Mississippi is being terminated by the Office of Economic Opportunity. This is not because the program isn't valid but because it would disturb the balance of politics in Mississippi. Klein and Saks, Inc. has helped keep the program alive. The goal of the program was to provide education, medical assistance, and nourishment for preschool children and their families.

Letter from Henry Zucker to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967

Henry Zucker, Executive Vice President of the Jewish Community Federation of Cleveland, encloses a check to Dr. King for the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edith Segal

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dora McDonald communicates to Edith Segal that she has be referred to the letter addressed originally to Bernard Lee. Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Segal that Dr. King is unable to comment on her book due to his consistent traveling endeavors in the South for the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Richard K. Goidel

Friday, March 15, 1968

Mr. Goidel, a student editor, requests a photograph from Dr. King to be featuredd in an article referencing the recent Time Magazine's Choice "68. Dr. King was nominated as a candidate for by Time magazine's Choice '68 collegiate Presidency. Sadly, Dr. King was assassinated two weeks later.

Letter from MLK to Earl Hall

Friday, July 14, 1967

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. Earl Hall, who sent a letter to the "National Observer" in defense of Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Jessie C. Treichler

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Mrs. Treichler to inform her that she will provide Dr. and Mrs. King arrival time at a later date. She also explains that Dr. King's physician has highly recommended that he limits his amount of events during his travels, therefore she feels sure that he will not be able to commit to all of her suggestions.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Royalty Statement for French Edition of The Strength to Love

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the French edition of Dr. King's "The Strength to Love," published by Casterman S.A. for the period October 1, 1965 to March 31, 1966.

Letter from 19 Year Old Swedish Boy to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Bo Blideman requests information on ways to join and assist the Civil Rights Movement during his upcoming stay in America.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

Letter from Robert J. McCracken to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964

Rev. McCracken, of Riverside Church in New York, informs Dr. King that he is scheduled to speak at two identical church services. The Church has added the second service because the New York World?s Fair will be open.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."