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Letter from Byron L. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, January 14, 1967

Byron L. Johnson questions the accountability and lack of trust within the House of Representatives. Furthermore, Mr. Johnson suggest the House of Representatives create a new code of ethics, observe due process of law, and ensure the financial validity of all candidates.

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

God

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's statement that there is no "medium point" as it relates to God.

Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 24, 1964

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Diane McFadden to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Diana McFadden requests information from Dr. King regarding his most significant personal characteristic.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

Letter from Edward Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963

Edward Crawford of New York encloses a quotation for Dr. King to keep in his possession. The quotation centers around individuals who continue to be slient about serious issues that matter.

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases a scripture from the book of Leviticus that pertains to sin.

Memo from the East Garfield Park Organizing Staff to James Bevel, Bill Briggs, Bernard LaFayette, and Jim Poling

Friday, September 2, 1966

In this memorandum, the organizing staff of East Garfield Park outlines their plans of action to end slums. Their agenda is designed to operate the organization effectively.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Office of Economic Opportunity Application for Community Action Program

This document displays the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee Wilcox County S.C.L.C., Inc. budget. The budget focuses on their Family Development and Family Education Project.

Telegram from Mrs. King to David Rogers

Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Mrs. King sends Mr. Rogers her appreciation for his effort in turning Dr. King's birthday into a federal holiday.

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis J. Jackson

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King notifies Rev. Jackson that he will not be able to travel to Orlando, but offers that he'll hopefully be able to accept more invitations in the near future. In addition, he requested that Rev. Jackson come and visit the Annual Convention of S.C.L.C. in Birmingham, Alabama.

MLK - Out of the Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958

This essay by Dr. King is featured in the February 1958 edition of Lutheran Woman's Work. King focuses on nonviolence and segregation while critiquing the sociological impacts of oppression.

Telegram from MLK to William Dawson

Monday, March 21, 1966

Dr. King informs William Dawson that the SCLC approves the plan to "transfer the Community Relations Service to the Department of Justice."

Letter from Ora Belle Tamm to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Ora Belle Tamm objects to the reaction of Negro leaders during the Adam Clayton Powell affair and expresses her disappointment to Dr. King.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

The Martin Luther King Fund

Friday, April 9, 1965

The Toronto Chapter of the Martin Luther King Fund organization commends Dr. King for his progessive actions to combat racial injusitices in the United States. The chapter contributes to Dr. King's organization for their active participation in the betterment of Selma, Alabama. In support of an official MLK day in Toronto, the organization invites Dr. King to speak.

Grand Hotel Reservation for MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

This reservation request was sent to Grand Hotel to establish accommodations for Dr. King and his associates during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies. One of the drafts of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech was scripted on Grand Hotel stationary.

Art

Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

Montesquieu

Dr. King cites the political philosopher Montesquieu on his ideology of the weakness of laws. He further details the comparison of coexistence and consecutive social status. Dr. King concludes with the elaboration of Montesquieu's use of facts.

Letter from L. H. Horace Perera to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

L. H. Horace Perera, Secretary General of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA), invites Dr. King to be the speaker of honor at the 20th Plenary Assembly of WFUNA.

Letter from MLK to Gilbert J. Clark

Saturday, May 21, 1966

Dr. King informs Gilbert J. Clark, Chairman at the Law School Forum, that he is unable to speak in Edmonton under the auspices of the Alberta Law School Forum during his trip to Canada.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."