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Letter from MLK to Louis J. Braun

Tuesday, September 9, 1969
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King agrees to serve on the Advisory Board of Campus Americans for Democratic Action. Dr. King explains that his ability to contribute to the Board will be limited, but he will assist when possible.

Keynote Address Introduction for Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967
Florida (FL), Maine (ME), New York (NY), California (CA)

At the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers this introduction of guest speaker, Sidney Poitier. Andrew Young further praises Mr. Poitier for informing the black community that one should be "proud to be black" because "black is beautiful."

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956
Tallahassee, FL, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Hawaii (HI), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

New York, NY

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Dr. King's "Three Lives for Mississippi" Preface

Friday, May 7, 1965

In this letter to Dora McDonald, Dr. King's assistant, Joan Daves writes that she has received Dr. King's preface for the foreign editions of "Three Lives For Mississippi."

Letter From D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

D. Parke Gibson informs Dr. King that they will be working with International Correspondence Schools. Gibson also feels that home study education could "lead to upgrading of many Negro workers."

Letter from Rosalie Montag to MLK

Monday, October 22, 1962
Montgomery, AL, Pennsylvania (PA)

Rosalie Montag writes the office of Dr. King requesting biographical information about the Reverend for her feature article in the school's newspaper.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William R. Cummings

Monday, December 18, 1961
Ohio (OH)

Dora McDonald writes William Cummings to inform him that Dr. King is in jail at the moment and the date of his return is difficult to determine. She explains that he will eventually be happy to learn of Mr. Cummings' invitation, but unfortunately his schedule will permit his attendance.

"HLS"

Thursday, March 28, 1968
VIETNAM

"HLS" believes that Dr. King is wrong in thinking that the Republican Party will do more for African Americans than the Democratic Party.

Pride

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Selma, AL

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

Monday, January 22, 1968
Michigan (MI)

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Wednesday, November 14, 1956
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding the Montgomery Bus Boycotts. The Supreme Court rendered a decision making separate but equal unconstitutional. Dr. King states that the next course of action that should be taken is the implementation of this noble decision and the end of the long night of enforced segregation.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Letter from Thomas S. Maloney to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 24, 1965
ITALY, Kentucky (KY)

Rev. Thomas S. Maloney informs Dora McDonald that he has yet to recieve previously requested materials regarding Dr. King's philosophy.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Cleveland, OH

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Letter from W. Harding Kneedler to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. W. Harding Kneedler states that "marches are outdated" and believes that a solution is to have quiet organized action.

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New Mexico (NM), Iowa (IA), INDIA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from Ohio University at Portsmouth to MLK Regarding Choice '68

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Ohio (OH)

The Public Affairs Forum of Ohio University at Portsmouth requests material from Dr. King for the university's participation in Time magazine's "Choice '68," a nationwide mock presidential election.

Letter from Debbie Rubiano to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

Ethics

Dr. King quotes Psalms 28:3, which he interprets as showing the importance of one's intentions and mental attitude.

MLK at his 36th Birthday Celebration

This series of photographs depicts Dr. King celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Letter from Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild

Monday, January 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

This letter is an invitation from Rabbi Rothschild to the Eighteenth Annual Institute for the Christian Clergy. Throughout the letter the Rabbi outlines the activities of the day and expresses his appreciation for all who will attend.

Letter from David Puckett to MLK

Saturday, September 3, 1966
Chicago, IL

David Puckett writes Dr. King on behalf of the poor whites in the Uptown area of Chicago. Puckett asks Dr. King to support the upcoming rally and march, where they will demand the release of Sam Joseph O'Donnell and protest against the police.

Poetry

Dr. King quotes Shelley's views on poetry from the book "Defiance of Poetry."

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.