Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"FINLAND"

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

Letter from Mary Brown to MLK

Sunday, October 31, 1965

Mary Brown, a student at Seward Park High School, asks for Dr. King's assistance in her presentation of a discussion on the challenges of the "Civil Rights workers."

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."

Letter from Mervyn Dymally to MLK

Wednesday, October 25, 1967

California State Sen. Mervyn Dymally (D-CA) expresses appreciation and support to Dr. King for the efforts of the SCLC with Operation Breadbasket in Los Angeles, CA.

Outline of MLK's 1962 Address to NAACP

In Dr. King's handwriting, this outline is from a speech he later addressed to the NAACP, at its 53rd Annual Convention in Atlanta, GA.

MLK Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, March 26, 1946

Dr. King answers a number of questions for an exam in his Bible course. He covers diverse topics, including prophecy and the Book of Job.

Letter from Clifford Park to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

The President of the United Church of Canada, London Conference, writes Dr. King attempting to receive a notification of his availability to be the devotional speaker at their annual conference.

The National Council of Negro Women

This brochure gives a brief overview of the NCNW and the positive results its had on the Negro community.

Christian Social Philosophy II

An outline briefly explains T.S. Eliot's opinion on culture and how it pertains to religion, specifically Christianity. Notes taken on the side of the outline insinuate that Western culture is beginning to disintegrate because the values it was built on are decreasing in importance.

Letter from Joan Daves Regarding International Travel

Tuesday, September 15, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she telephoned Mr. Smeaton regarding lodging arrangements in London and Berlin.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edwin Fenton

Monday, July 10, 1967

Ms. McDonald is responding to the letter requesting permission of the use of Dr. King's speeches. The permission was granted to the Carnegie Institute of Technology. If any other services were needed then SCLC would be at their disposal.

Letter from MLK Regarding the Movie "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands"

In this letter, Dr. King writes to an unknown recipient regarding royalty matters of a movie entitled "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands". Dr. King thanks the recipient for consideration, and urges that further communication should be directed to Reverend Andrew Young.

Howard University Request of Dr. King

Saturday, March 11, 1967

Lewis Fenderson is extending the deadline for the essays requested of Dr. King. He makes the suggestion that if time is a factor, several excerpts from him would be more than welcomed.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

In this letter, Vice President Humphrey extends a holiday greeting to Dr. King and his associates.

Letter from Ralph Saylor to MLK

Mr. Saylor assures Dr. King that he still has the support of the white community regardless of his stance on the Vietnam War.

Dr. King's Written Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Ibarance Mann's views on death. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for refernce to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions and bible verses.

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Earl M. Smith, on behalf of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, requests permission from Dr. King to translate and publish a Portuguese edition of "Strength to Love."

MLK Schedule for November, 1960

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements for November, 1960.

This is SCLC

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Miss Enid Baird

Dora McDonald sends word via telegram to Enid C. Baird informing her of an unforeseen emergency that prevents her attendance at the Urban League Convention.

Letter From Rabbi Robert E. Goldburg to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

Mr. Goldburg congratulates Dr. King on a recent article about civil rights that Dr. King wrote for "The Nation."

Letter from Joan Daves to Seong Hak Lee

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Joan Daves responds to a request to translate Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Why We Can't Wait" into the Korean language. She conveys Dr. King's gratitude about such an interest while also expressing hesitancy in granting permission immediately. The project can only be green lighted if specific procedures are followed which Daves lays out in her response.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from R. A. Peterson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This letter of condolence, originating from a Bank of America executive in San Francisco, CA and addressed to Mrs. King. The writer expresses hope that Dr. King's work and legacy will carry forward in his tradition of nonviolence.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter to Mrs. King from Rev. and Mrs. Joseph L. Roberts

Thursday, April 11, 1968

In this heartfelt correspondence to Mrs. King, Rev. Joseph Roberts, President Elder of the West Detroit District for the AME Church, expressed sympathy for the death of Dr. King. In the letter, he acknowledges the enclosure of the hard copy of his spoken tribute to Dr. King. Seven years later, in 1975, Rev. Roberts would succeed Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., as the fourth pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

The Nationalism of Ezra

This note card outlines Ezra views on "mixed marriages."

Letter from Rabbi Byron T. Rubenstein to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Rabbi Rubenstein writes to congratulate MLK on the Nobel Peace Prize and recounts his experience while working with the SCLC in St. Augustine, Florida.