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Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Friday, August 2, 1963
Tennessee (TN), Chattanooga, TN

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

Tuesday, November 2, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
CANADA

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Detroit Free Press: Dr. King Strengthens an Anti-War Coalition

Thursday, April 6, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

This article, which appeared in the 'As We See It' column of the Detroit Free Press, reports Dr. King's speech in New York from April 4, 1967 on his opposition to the Vietnam War.

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Washington (WA)

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

People-to-People Tour: Philadelphia

Sunday, August 1, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This itinerary details Dr. King's schedule during his stay in Philadelphia.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Selma, AL

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Letter from Senator Thomas H. Kuchel to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Washington, D.C.

California Republican Senator Thomas H. Kuchel writes Dr. King thanking him his letter celebrating the recent passage in the Senate of the Civil Rights bill.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Mission to Mississippi

California (CA), North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, North Carolina (NC), CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Birmingham, AL, LIBERIA, Detroit, MI

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Letter from US Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967
JORDAN, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

United States Ambassador Findley Burns writes Dr. King expressing his joy regarding King's upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Despite warnings due to Middle East conflict, Burns hopes that Dr. King will not cancel the trip. He sees the visit as an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between the US and Jordan.

Letter from the Inmates of Cook County Jail to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967
Chicago, IL

The inmates of Cook County Jail request Dr. King's help in fighting certain injustices in the criminal system. The writer informs Dr. King that he may contact Ms. Juanita Whiltfield for more details.

Letter from Dale Rickmon to Rev. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

This letter of condolence is addressed to the Reverend Abernathy as the succeeding head of the SCLC. It accompanies a memorial poem written in dedication to Dr. King.

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963
Wisconsin (WI)

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Letter from Govenor Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962
New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller encloses a copy of "The Future of Federalism." His book "traces the development of the federal idea in the United States."

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King quotes George Hedley’s “The Symbol of the Faith.”

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Birmingham, AL

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

Letter from Joe Cheru to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joe Cheru advises Dr. King to adopt a technique called "organized massive write-in." Using this method, he suggested that Dr. King could channel greater support from people who could not participate directly by being physically present for demonstrations.

Letter to MLK Regarding Merit Award

Indiana (IN)

The author writes a letter that advocates for Dr. King to win an award of merit. In the letter, he discusses some major events that occurred throughout the Reverend's life. Some of these events include: leading the Civil Rights Movement, winning the Nobel Peace Prize, and becoming a strong political figure.

Request for Preliminary Determination of Eligibility - Nonprofit

Tuesday, November 7, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This document serves as a request to establish Ebenezer Baptist Church as a Non-Profit Sponsor or Mortgagor.

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
New York, NY

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegel's philosophy regarding rationality and reality.

The Voice: A Bulletin of Crozer Theological Seminary

Chester, PA

Dr. King received a copy of this publication from Crozer, which provided alumni updates, religious articles, financial supporters, and current and upcoming seminary events.
Dr. King graduated with honors from Crozer in 1951 as class valedictorian.

Letter from Agnes Rudell to MLK

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Ms. Rudell suggests that Dr. King should relocate to another country due to his dissatisfaction with the United States of America.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Monday, February 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

The Sickness of our Society

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.