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American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965
Lowndes County, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Johannesburg, South Africa, New York (NY)

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

Augustinanism

Dr. King writes notes on Saint Augustine, Bishop of Hippo, and his "vast theological system" called Augustinianism. Dr. King describes the system as a comprehensive church philosophy that was very pessimistic about the nature of man.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN)

This is the SCLC's 1963 Spring Newsletter. Articles include: "The 22 Billion Dollar Giant" and "Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany."

Letter from George Altman to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
New York (NY), BRAZIL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

George Altman informs Dr. King that one of his friends purchased a recording of Dr. King's speech entitled "The Great March to Freedom" and inquires about receiving the text of the speech.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

Sunday, September 14, 1958
Brooklyn, NY, Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 17, 1957
Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), RUSSIAN FEDERATION, GREECE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King interprets Jesus' command to "love your enemies" and outlines how to accomplish this goal. He closes this sermon by relating the philosophy of love to the use of nonviolence as a means to overcome oppression.

Comte (A Criticism by Dr. R. flint)

Dr. King quotes a statement from Robert Flint's "Philosophy of History in France and Germany" which criticizes French philosopher, August Comte. Robert Flint was a Scottish philosopher.

Letter from the West Chester NAACP to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964
Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), SWEDEN, NORWAY

The West Chester Branch of the NAACP congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

News Release Regarding Birmingham Shooting at Liberty Supermarket

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

This SCLC press release was issued in the wake of a violent episode in Birmingham, Alabama on February 21, 1966. That night, 23 year old Emory W. McGowen drove his car into a group of protesters before opening fire on the crowd wounding five people. The protest, called by Hosea L. Williams, was against Liberty Supermarket, a business being targeted for employment discrimination. The release contains information regarding the incident and includes pertinent quotes from Dr. King, Mr. Williams, and local minister and witness Rev. Wood.

St. Augustine, Florida: 400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

St. Augustine, FL, Jacksonville, FL, Massachusetts (MA), Connecticut (CT), Florida (FL)

The SCLC compiled and published this pamphlet about St. Augustine, Florida, describing a long history of racial discrimination and segregation supported by Northern tourism.

Letter from Vivian Cintron to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vivian Cintron, who is a student, offers her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Telegram Plea to Dr. King

Friday, March 29, 1968
California (CA)

An American citizen writes Dr. King pleading for him not to blame whites for all of the misunderstandings in the US.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

Sunday, March 1, 1964
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Arkansas (AR), Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Iowa (IA), San Francisco, CA, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Brooklyn, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Kentucky (KY), Florida (FL), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Albany, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963
HUNGARY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, SOUTH AFRICA, New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), DENMARK, Connecticut (CT), Tallahassee, FL, Orangeburg, SC, Louisville, KY, Brooklyn, NY, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Iowa (IA)

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

MLK in Memoriam

Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

Philadelphia Inquirer: Balance of Payments 'Cure' Was Devised in Near-Panic

Thursday, January 11, 1968
Wisconsin (WI), JAPAN, Washington, D.C.

This article by Rowland Evans and Robert Novak criticizes a proposed 2% border tax on imported goods. They argue that President Johnson's support of such a measure is reckless and will cause economic repercussions around the world.

Telegram from President John F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963
Washington, D.C.

President John F. Kennedy invites Dr. King to a meeting of religious leaders to discuss the nation's civil rights problem.

Letter to the Managers of "Christianity Today'' from Rev Earl E. Josten

Saturday, June 17, 1967
Iowa (IA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, dated June 17, 1967, Josten writes to the managers of "Christianity Today" to inform them that he cannot comply with their request for names. He is not complying because of the attitude Christianity Today's editor is taking toward Dr. King. Rev. Josten is a pastor at The Methodist Church in Columbus Junction, Iowa. Josten offers prayer to the editor for his "terrible tirade" against King, and states that he will not commend this paper to any more friends if this attitude continues.

Employment Recommendation Letter to MLK from Stone's Mercantile Agency on behalf of Raymond C. Fauntroy

Tuesday, October 24, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter Thelma Goldsborough, a representative of Stone's Mercantile Agency, requests a personal reference for Raymond C. Fauntroy from Dr. King.

Letter from Arthur James to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Arthur James, a member of the Movement for the Advancement of Black Brotherhood and Culture, invites Dr. King to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 6, 1967
Chicago, IL

David Wallace writes Dora McDonald and attaches contributions from Negro businessmen involved with Chicago's Operation Breadbasket.

Schleiermacher (What Is Revelation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dr. Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King expresses regret to Dr. Dick regarding his inability to participate in a series of meetings sponsored by the Conference of Mennonites in Winnipeg, Canada.

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
San Francisco, CA

Subsequent to the assassination of Dr. King, three posters are erected in San Francisco to express the opposition to his death and the continuance of the movement. Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy is instructed to show these posters to Coretta Scott King at an appropriate time.

MLK's Address to Addison Junior High

Thursday, October 22, 1964
Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King explains the importance of education and encourages the students to exercise their abilities to the fullest and strive for excellence. Dr. King further describes the duties each student must fulfill to make an impact on their community and the world.