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Morality

Dr. King quotes Adolf Hitler on the "dirty and degrading self-mortification" of conscience and morality, from Erich Meissner's "Confusion of Faces."

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from Curtis Harris to MLK

Monday, February 1, 1965

Curtis W. Harris, of the Virginia State Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, wrote to Dr. King to alert him that the Smithfield Packing Company has a labor situation very similar to that of Scripto in Atlanta. Harris explains that none of the senior Negro employees are in the appropriate income bracket and could use Dr. King's assistance.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Evans

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Evans for their monetary contribution of $200. Dr. King references the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and explains how the Evans' contribution supports the efforts of the organization.

Paix, Bonheur, Sante et Amour pour l'an 1960

Friday, January 1, 1960

Dr. King received this card from the editor of the French tabloid Paris-Jour (Paris Day). The headline reads, "Peace, Happiness, Health and Love for the Year 1960."

Sworn Deposition of MLK

Monday, December 10, 1956

Dr. King records an event that happened on a train between Nashville and Montgomery, during which a policeman denied him access to the general waiting room.

Letter from Thomas C. McGarth to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965

Congressman Thomas C. McGarth writes to Dr. King concerning recent challenges surrounding the seating of the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. McGarth discusses his involvement with the voting process.

The American Dream

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Letter from MLK to Senator Howard Cannon

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Democratic Senator Howard Cannon of Nevada for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from William Seabron to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Department of Agriculture Assistant to the Secretary, William M. Seabron writes Dr. King to enquire about fire insurance for "Negro citizens." He explains that a lack of fire insurance prevents citizens from improving existing homes or building new ones, following disaster. In addition, he requests any additional information Dr. King may find useful to the Department of Agriculture.

Telegram from Margit Vinberg to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Margit Vinberg invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be the guests of honor at a luncheon in Stockholm, Sweden, sponsored by the Joint Swedish Press Publicistklubben.

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Letter from W. Ivan Hoy to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

W. Ivan Hoy, on behalf of the University of Miami, invites Dr. King to be a guest lecturer for their Miami Religion Lecture Series.

MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

Letter from Joan Daves to Seong Hak Lee

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Joan Daves responds to a request to translate Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Why We Can't Wait" into the Korean language. She conveys Dr. King's gratitude about such an interest while also expressing hesitancy in granting permission immediately. The project can only be green lighted if specific procedures are followed which Daves lays out in her response.

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Letter from Donald F. Hinds to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Donald Hinds writes Dr. King to discuss issues such as the Vietnam War and economic injustice towards Negroes.

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Monday, October 24, 1966

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Letter from Murray Thomson to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

A representative of the Canadian Friends Service Committee, a subcommittee of The Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in Canada, writes Dr. King to invite him to a "Conference for Diplomats." The sender tells Dr. King that the Conference will take place in Portland, Ontario, and emphasizes Human Rights Year. He asks Dr. King to consider being the keynote speaker for the event.

Invitation from Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph J. Bunche invite Dr. and Mrs. King to an informal dinner in the Kew Gardens neighborhood of Queens, New York.

MLK Statement on Libel Suit

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding a libel suit. He explains that he has been served papers but is not at liberty to comment.

Anonymous Letter to President Johnson

The anonymous sender of this letter urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to take action to fund programs in order to get people in school or at work in order to quell rising tensions in cities filled with people dissatisfied with their social and economic positions.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Saturday, November 24, 1962

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Letter to Mr. Walter Simcich from MLK

Tuesday, September 7, 1965

Dr. King informs Walter Simcich that he is "deeply grateful" to have been extended this invitation. Furthermore, Dr. King notifies Mr. Simcich that he is unable to accept this speaking engagement due to his heavy schedule involving the nonviolence movement.

Letter from the Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

Thursday, August 1, 1963

The Chairman of the Martin Luther King Fund informs Dr. King that they have distributed copies of the Letter from Birmingham Jail. Those who read the letter were impressed and described it as a "masterful job." The organization contributes to the SCLC for lobbying the passage of the President's Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

Thursday, July 12, 1956

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.