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Speaking Out

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Flight Schedule Proposal for MLK and Party

Henderson Travel Service, Inc. created this suggested flight schedule for Dr. King, Ralph D. Abernathy, Andrew Young, Bernard Lee, and Dora McDonald.

We Salute You!

Thirteen members of Ebenezer Baptist Church are praised for their years of service and role in making the church monumental.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. King to Mrs. A. B. Cooper & Family

Dr. and Mrs. King express their regret for being unable to attend the funeral; however, they offer condolences to Mrs. A. B. Cooper and family for the loss of their loved one.

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.

State of New York Civil Rights Bureau - 1967 Annual Report

This is the overview of the advancements and achievements affiliated with the New York Civil Rights Bureau, in 1967.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter from James W. Kelly to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963

James W. Kelly, Director of Chaplains Division, writes Dr. King inviting him to a Supervisory Chaplains Conference headed by the Chief of Chaplains of the United States Navy. Kelly states that the conference is a rededication of service to God and his people in the military. Kelly closes by stating, "Your Cooperation will be a great contribution to the cause of religion in the United States Navy and Marine Corps and to their clergymen in uniform."

MLK Speaker's Contract

Monday, April 3, 1967

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin.

SCLC Constituent to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968

This letter, originating from New York City in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination, is from a supporter who is inquiring about the purchase of items relating to Dr. King's correspondence.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.


Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Nathan W. Turner to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965

The American Baptist Board of Education and Publication sends a contribution to the SCLC to assist with voter registration.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Contributors List

This is a list of the organizations that contributed to the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 3, 1965

H. C. Huntley invites Dr. King to come speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Scotland during Holy Week.

Letter from Tom to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 27, 1967

Tom suggests to Dora McDonald that Dr. King accept ABC's invitation to appear on the show "Issues and Answers."

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Friday, May 19, 1967

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

John F. Kennedy Award Dinner for MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964

The Catholic Interracial Council sponsors the John F. Kennedy Dinner for Dr. King. The Master of Ceremonies will be Sister Mary William and will take place at the Pick-Congress Hotel.

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

An Invitation to the Honoring of Rabbi Israel Dresner and Reverend Richard Wilson

This document serves as an invitation to a event honoring Rabbi Dresner and Rev. Wilson for their outstanding spiritual leadership.

Initiative for Peace In Vietnam

Friday, March 10, 1967

Philip Noel-Baker and Father George Dominique Pire detail the origins of the Initiative for Peace in Vietnam and its action plan. As they explain, a group of Norwegian citizens approached living Nobel Peace Prize winners to develop a project focusing on achieving peace in Vietnam. To reach that goal, the initiative plans to send representatives to each group involved with the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Clarence Portericker to Mrs. King

Clarence Portericker, a student in New York, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King hoping that Dr. King's dream will come true.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Dr. King praises President John F. Kennedy for his eloquent appeal for freedom and justice and says the President's message will become "a hallmark in the annals of American history" if his proposed legislation is passed.

Letter from W. Russell Chapman to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962

The York County, Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP sends a second invitation to Dr. King to be a guest speaker.


Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Methods of Private Religious Living."

Telegram from Robert Mangum to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1961

Mr. Mangum sends his support to Dr. King as he serves his time in Jefferson county jail.