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Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967
Florida (FL)

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

Letter from Arthur V. Hamman to MLK about Spirituality

Monday, June 19, 1967
Ohio (OH)

In this letter, Mr. Hamman lectures Dr. King on the concept of heaven and hell, asserting that there is no race, nationality, etc., before God.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), Howard University, Atlanta, GA, INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, MEXICO, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Chris Folcker to Joan Daves Regarding MLK Recording

Friday, January 13, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Chris Folcker informs Joan Daves of the limitations of the grammophone record with Dr. King and Harry Belafonte produced in Stockholm.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.

Telegrams from MLK to John and Robert Kennedy

Thursday, May 30, 1963
Washington, D.C.

In these draft telegrams, Dr. King requests a meeting with President John Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy to address the imminent crisis in the South.

Correspondence from Maude L. Ballou to Miss Frehse - Apr 29, 1960

Friday, April 29, 1960
Illinois (IL)

Here Maude L. Ballou is responding to Miss Frehse letter concerning questions about MLK's book "Stride Towards Freedom." Miss Ballou states that MLK's time schedule is too full to respond to her questions.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962
Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., Brooklyn, NY, New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Philadelphia, PA

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Letter from Christian Action to MLK

Monday, April 20, 1964
London, England, SOUTH AFRICA

L. John Collins, Chairman of Christian Action, writes Dr. King inquiring if he would be interested in attending a public meeting in London regarding race relations in South Africa. In addition to Dr. King, one of the prospective speakers mentioned was James Baldwin.

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

Missouri (MO)

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

Invitation to 101st Founders' Day of Morehouse College

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Joseph Draper, a former classmate, invites Dr. King to the 101st Founders' Day Inauguration activities at Morehouse College. Draper hopes for Dr. King's attendance, as he feels this will give support to newly instated President Gloster.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, June 21, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Selma, AL

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Playboy Magazine to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Doug Benson writes on behalf of Hugh Hefner in response to a letter from Dr. King requesting donations. Benson informs Dr. King that Mr. Hefner, who supports the civil rights struggle, suggests placing a shorter, more personalized, appeal for funds in The Playboy Forum.

Telegram from Bea Stanley to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Bea Stanley writes to Dr. King during his confinement at the Jefferson County Courthouse Jail. Stanley informs him that many of his supporters and friends are concerned regarding his health and safety, and also updates him on the progress of one of his publications.

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Queen Fields

Monday, February 25, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King advises Mrs. Queen Field to contact Mr. Clarence Jones to obtain support for her children.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harold E. Fey

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald is requesting that Harold Fey re-new Dr. King's subscription to "The Christian Century" for one year.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Theological Seminary (Its Function)

Dr. King cites an article by Ernest Cadman Colwell, "Toward Better Theological Education," published in the Journal of Religion.

Letter from International Institute for Peace to MLK

Sunday, June 12, 1966
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, AUSTRIA

O. P. Paliwal and Yves Choliere, from the World Council of Peace, invite Dr. King to speak at a session in Geneva about the well being of Vietnam.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

Atlanta, GA, CHINA, VIETNAM

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Letter from MLK to Rev. A. D. Evans

Tuesday, July 20, 1965
Detroit, MI

Dr. King writes Rev. A. D. Evans and friends of St. Paul A.M.E. Church to thank them for their financial contribution of $500 to the SCLC. He discusses the current efforts of the organization such as Operation Breadbasket and the citizenship schools. Dr. King explains their monthly budget and the importance of supporters.

Letter from MLK to A. K. Salz

Thursday, August 20, 1964
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Salz for his financial contribution to the SCLC and explains that the contribution will help the SCLC continue its civil rights efforts.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Congratulations from Darien Public Schools Superintendent to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Mr. Coffin congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Coffin also provides Dr. King with information on the initiatives of the Darien Public Schools to further progress the civil rights movement.