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Chapter 1 - Introduction

Vermont (VT)

In this dissertation, Dr. King discusses several investigations and problems. He centers the paper around a comparison of "the conceptions of God in the thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
New York (NY)

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Lyndon B. Johnson invites Dr. King to a conference to hear a progress report on the work of the President's Committee for Equal Employment.

1963 World Day of Prayer

Friday, March 5, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

Letter from MLK to Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller

Friday, September 14, 1962
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

In this letter, Dr. King writes to New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller to express his gratitude for the Governor's letter and copy of his new book. Dr. King also refers to the possibility of Gov. Rockefeller's making "a large contribution to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights," and writes extensively about the Society and the effect such a contribution would have.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

Sunday, March 28, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965
INDIA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from Clifford Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), Detroit, MI

Clifford Alexander, Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, sends Dr. King a report involving discrimination against Jews in the workplace. According to the report, numerous members of the Jewish community face prejudice from receiving management level jobs in the white collar sector.

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963
North Carolina (NC), Birmingham, AL

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lamb Toledo to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. Toledo offer support to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy, A.D. King, and Wyatt Walker.


Dr. King writes about Protagoras’ view that appearance is reality.

Letter from Harold Franklin to MLK

Saturday, May 2, 1964
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Harold Franklin expresses appreciation to Dr. King for granting him scholarship aid.

Letter from Mr. Ossie Davis to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
New York (NY)

Mr. Ossie Davis suggests to Dr. King that a tribute be prepared to honor the life of Dr. W. E. B. DuBois. Mr. Davis then asks Dr. King for his assistance in gaining sponsorship from "distinguished men and women."

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

Chicago, IL

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

Letter from Martin Sargent to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965
London, England, FRANCE

Martin Sargent expresses his and the American Church in Paris' appreciation for Dr. King's attendance and participation.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964
Missouri (MO), INDIA

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Letter to Representatives of Harper & Row and N.A.L from Joan Daves Regarding "Why We Cant Wait"

Tuesday, April 14, 1964
Chicago, IL

This memo serves to inform all parties involved with the publishing of "Why We Can't Wait" of the arranged prepublication agreements made by Mrs. Joan Daves.

Man the Sinner

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Luther Hodges to MLK Regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Luther Hodges, sent this letter to Dr. King on the eve of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He writes that he, King, and President Johnson share enthusiasm over the bill and are positive for the future of America. Hodges asks for Dr. King's continued aid in leading the nation to comply with the bill and, in the words of President Johnson, "eliminate the final strongholds of intolerance and hatred."

Letter from MLK to A. Phillip Randolph

Monday, April 13, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King writes A. Philip Randolph to acknowledge the need for future strategic planning in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dr. MLK to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church about a Contribution

Friday, February 9, 1968
Virginia (VA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to A Fellowship of Concern at the First Presbyterian Church in Stuanton, Virginia while explaining how such contributions help the SCLC and civil rights.

Letter from Jim Morton to Members of the UTC Board of Directors

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Jim Morton communicates the results of the executive committee conference call in preparation for a board member conference call at a later date. The Urban Training Center for Christian Mission is dedicated to community action and supports additional organizations. The training center is attempting to input a new training program and have appointed three staff positions.

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King writes about Irish philosopher and theologian John Scotus Eriugena. He records a quote that states, "Authority comes from reason not reason from authority."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Prentiss Childs

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, sends this letter to Mr. Prentiss Childs of CBS. The correspondence serves as documentation for reimbursement of Dr. King's recent trip to Washington, D.C.

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.


Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967
Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.