The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:


Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

Letter from R. Terry Taft to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962

R. Terry Taft expresses his disappointment in reading Dr. King's feelings in Newsweek regarding the failure of the Office of Urban affairs to become a federal cabinet position.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Dr. King thanks singer-actress Eartha Kitt for her generous support and deep concern for the people of Birmingham, Alabama, and elsewhere in the South. He extends his appreciation to those in the Harlem Apollo Theatre who have contributed in response to her example.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes each of the members of the board to seek an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters for Dr. J. Curtis Nixon. Nixon was a lawyer and famous labor mediator.

Comte (A Criticism by Dr. R. flint)

Dr. King quotes a statement from Robert Flint's "Philosophy of History in France and Germany" which criticizes French philosopher, August Comte. Robert Flint was a Scottish philosopher.

Letters Between MLK and Max Dean

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dr. King sends a letter out to supporters, updating them on the progress made through the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King also informs supporters that the work is far from done and asks for support. Writing on the back of Dr. King's letter, Max Dean informs Dr. King that his most important priority is an immediate and unconditional withdrawal from Vietnam. This is despite that Dean has "great respect" for Dr. King and the SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson Excerpt

Wednesday, August 19, 1964

Dr. King writes President Johnson about the issues Negroes are facing in Mississippi, where they were being denied the right to vote. King calls Johnson's attention to the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, which was engaged in a struggle for representation against the National Democratic Party as well as the political network of Mississippi.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Celestine Fernando

Friday, May 5, 1967

Ms. McDonald grants Reverend Fernando permission to publish Dr. King's, "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Eugene Patterson to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Eugene Patterson thanks Dr. King for the congratulatory letter in which Dr. King clarified his position on Vietnam. Patterson also asks Dr. King to suggest a time for them to meet to discuss the Civil Rights Movement and Vietnam.

The Mark of the Hawk

"The Mark of the Hawk" was a 1957 drama film distributed by Universal-International. The film features notable actors, Sidney Poitier and Eartha Kitt. Dr. King states that this movie is one of the "most captivating and moving productions."

Response Letter from Miss D. McDonald to Professor Paul Kurt Ackerman

Thursday, July 13, 1967

This letter is in response to Professor Paul Kurt Ackermann from Miss. D. McDonald, c/o MLK, referencing a request for submission of Dr. King's manuscript.

Telegram from MLK to Richard Maguire of the DNC

Dr. King informs Richard Maguire of the Democratic National Committee that he is unable to accept an invitation to the pre-inaugural dinner.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.

Letter from C. Elden to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

C. Elden urges Dr. King to speak with Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, about his refusal to be drafted into the military. Elden believes that Dr. King's influence will change Clay's mind and make Clay realize that citizens "must fight."

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Letter from Charles H. Percy to MLK

U.S. Senator Charles H. Percy expresses his appreciation for Dr. King, while also expressing his hope that the senate will soon pass a housing bill.

Letter to Mrs. King from Rev. and Mrs. Joseph L. Roberts

Thursday, April 11, 1968

In this heartfelt correspondence to Mrs. King, Rev. Joseph Roberts, President Elder of the West Detroit District for the AME Church, expressed sympathy for the death of Dr. King. In the letter, he acknowledges the enclosure of the hard copy of his spoken tribute to Dr. King. Seven years later, in 1975, Rev. Roberts would succeed Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., as the fourth pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey B. Preston

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dora McDonald sends a reply to the Mrs. Carey B. Preston accepting an invitation on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude for the "Palais des Sports" event in Paris, France which brought support financially for the movement. Dr. King stress the duality between France and America in the "total struggle."

Letter from Mr. Stephen Benedict to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

In this letter Mr. Benedict is writing on behalf of Mrs. Ann R. Pierson to notify Dr. King of her contribution to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Don Blaine to MLK

Thursday, August 26, 1965

Don Blaine seeks advice from Dr. King concerning the idea of organizing a peace caravan that would travel throughout the United States. Blaine views this suggestion as a way to garner international support for peace.

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

Letter from Mrs. Sigrid Sharp to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Mrs. Sharp commends Dr. King for his open opposition to the Vietnam War. She further requests copies of his April 4, 1967 speech before New York's Riverside Church, in order to raise political awareness and garner support against the war effort.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row, Publishers Incorporated to MLK and Joan Daves Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Tuesday, December 31, 1968

This document outlines the royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom".

Letter from MLK to Canon Hugh Monteflore

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Dr. King declines Canon Hugh Montefiore invitation to speak at the University Church in Cambridge, England due to his pastoral duties at his own church.

Vietnam Peace Parade Flyer

This flyer, issued by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, advertises to New Yorkers to head to D.C. for an anti-war demonstration on October 21st and 22nd. Calling for citizens to 'Confront the Warmakers in Washington,' this flyer features a young boy with a sign reading "Lyndon - I'm too young to die."

Irresistible Grace

Dr. King notes the meaning of irresistible grace.