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The Sickness of our Society

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King describes three points that he claims as symptoms of the "Sickness of Our Society." These points include a suicide rate of one every twenty-seven minutes, more than half a million Americans in mental hospitals and three-quarters of a million with alcohol problems.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

SCLC Newsletter: July 1963

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, SOUTH AFRICA, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York (NY), Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

This SCLC newsletter features numerous articles written by members of the SCLC regarding Birmingham, Alabama. Also featured is a graphic story of the crisis in Birmingham.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

Monday, October 30, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Berkeley, CA, Wisconsin (WI), Brooklyn, NY, Ohio (OH), Selma, AL

Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding an Outstanding Balance

Wednesday, January 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King of the new student dormitory and inquires about a donation to pay for the cost to furnish one room.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

Washington, D.C.

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Document Cover Page

Monday, January 15, 1968

This document, dated January 15, 1968, from Johnson Publishing Company is a cover page titled "For Dr. King."

Letter from Hanna Nazzal to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967
JORDAN

Hanna Nazzal of the Terra Sancta Tourist Company reassures Dr. King of peaceful relations in the Middle East and that his trip to Jerusalem will not be disrupted.

Telegram from SCLC to NAACP Convention

Tuesday, July 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference welcomes Roy Wilkins to Atlanta. They also express their hope that the laborers of the NAACP convenetion will help bring about equality.

Letter from Addele Dunn to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mrs. Dunn writes Dr. King describing her living conditions in the south side of Chicago. Dr. King is currently in Chicago advocating for the citizens of the city.

Letter from James Scheuer to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

In this letter to Dr. King, Congressman Scheuer asks Dr. King to testify at a hearing of the Select Subcommittee on Labor of the House Committee on Education and Labor about House Resolution 12962. This bill focused on creating a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

Telegram to MLK from A Phillip Randolph and Andrew Heiskell

Friday, December 22, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Randolph and Heiskell request Dr. King's presence at an Urban Coalition Steering Committee Meeting in Washington.

Telegram from Clarance L Carroll to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mr. Carroll sends a congratulatory telegram to Dr. King. He also requests future correspondence.

Letter from David Gibbons and David O. Woodward to MLK

Wednesday, June 5, 1963
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

David Woodyard and David Gibbons send Dr. King a check to support the work of the SCLC. Woodyard and Gibbons are employed at Denison University in Granville, Ohio.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Maurice DeCuir to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter, Maurice De Cuir expresses his concern, in regard to race relations, as it pertains to government jobs in helping the economic status of the negro. He then informs Dr. King of the intent, of the Equal Opportunity Commission, to investigate the matter.

Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

People In Action: The Complete Life

Saturday, April 27, 1963
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

Dr. King was in jail in Birmingham and unable to contribute his regular column to the New York Amsterdam News. The editors published these excerpts from a sermon he had recently given at Riverside Church on "The Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Letter from MLK to Charles A. Melton

Monday, April 25, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King declines an invitation to visit Westchester, Pennsylvania due to the time he must devote to the Chicago campaign and helping political candidates in Alabama.

Press Release on Voter Registration

Monday, October 12, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from P. Charles to MLK

Friday, November 6, 1964
INDIA

P. Charles, President of the Hyderabad Lutheran Church in India, writes Dr. King to commend him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and also to congratulate him on the landslide election victory of President Lyndon Johnson.

MLK Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Lowndes County, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, North Carolina (NC), EGYPT, CUBA, VIETNAM

Dr. King, at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses numerous civil rights issues the organization is addressing throughout America.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 31, 1962

The Gandhi Society for Human Rights lists the names of individuals whom they would like to serve on the organization's Board of Directors in which Dr. King serves as the Honorary President.

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ)

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Monday, December 11, 1961

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

Invitation from Hermon Dilmore to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Representing the American Baptist Men, Director, Hermon C. Dilmore makes acquaintance with Dr. King via mutual friend, J.C. Herrin, Assistant General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention. Mr. Dilmore invites Dr. King to stop by the American Baptist Men's booth at the Convention in Pittsburgh. Furthermore, he invites attendance of at least one family from Dr. King's church to the 24th Annual National Conference at the American Baptist Assembly in Green Lake, Wisconsin.

The Law and Civil Disobedience

Tuesday, August 23, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Connecticut (CT), London, England, Kentucky (KY), Georgia (GA), UNITED KINGDOM

Harris Wofford, a law professor and member of Senator John F. Kennedy's staff, discusses civil disobedience and its relationship to the law at the student association of Notre Dame Law School. He advocates in favor of civil disobedience using the theories of Thoreau, Socrates, Gandhi and others to support the need to break unjust laws. Dr. King pens handwritten questions on the top of this document pertaining to the changing of unjust laws in the courts.