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Letter from MLK to Henry Luce

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Henry Luce for the invitation to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine. However, due to another engagement on the other side of the U.S., Dr. King regretfully cannot commit to come to the dinner.

Discrimination in Operations of Interstate Motor Carriers of Passenger

Wednesday, December 20, 1961

Harold McCoy, Secretary of the United States Interstate Commerce Commission, proposes that passenger tickets should include a non-discrimination notice.

Statement by MLK Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

After being notified of receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King released this statement to the public.He refers to the award not as an honor but as a "tribute to the discipline."

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Saul S. Sherman

Monday, January 3, 1966

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Saul S. Sherman for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes how monumental the change for Negroes in the South has been in the last ten years and how revolutionary the future will be thanks to her generous donation.

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

Dancer, singer, and actress Josephine Baker writes Dr. King to share her views on the current political climate of the United States of America. Her belief is that the best chance of retaining and continuing the progress made by John F. Kennedy is to re-elect Lyndon B. Johnson for President and Robert Kennedy as a New York Senator.

MLK Itinerary

This document details the meetings and events set to take place during Dr. King's trip to Europe, Asia, Africa and Hawaii over a 55 day span.

Hamilton Goodwill Africa Foundation Invitation to MLK

Friday, June 3, 1966

A.K. Mighton invites Dr. King to speak at the Hamilton Goodwill Africa Foundation. He informs Dr. King of a trip to Africa in which several doctors and ministers traveled to Africa. Mr. Mighton then expresses his hopefulness in Dr. King's acceptance of his invitation.

10th Anniversary SCLC Convention Program

This document contains a program for the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention hosted by Rev. Howard Creecy, President of the Atlanta Affiliate Chapter of the SCLC. The theme of the convention is "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Telegram from Mr. Robert Lieberman to MLK about Denver Teachers Union

In this telegram, Mr. Lieberman writes to Dr. King requesting his support for an upcoming unionization vote by Denver public school teachers.

Letter from MLK to George T. Raymond of the Chester, Pennsylvania NAACP

Wednesday, February 13, 1963

Dr. King declines the Chester Branch of the NAACP's invitation to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bill Daniels

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Bill Daniels, of WSB-TV, expressing outrage over a cartoon depicting overt racism in a court of law.

Letter from Robert J. Beaubien to MLK

Friday, December 18, 1964

Robert Beaubien congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Letter from Aguedo Mojica Marrero to MLK

Friday, March 10, 1967

Tthe Vice President of the Puerto Rican House of Representatives requests copies of the speech given by Dr. King to the Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam.

Thank You Note to Martin Luther King Jr. from Mt. Olive Baptist Church

Sunday, July 30, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King from the Mt.Olive Baptist Church. They were sending a donation to the SCLC and thanking them for rebuilding their church that had been burned.

Telegram from MLK to Katie B. Whickham

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Dr. King welcomes Mrs. Whickham and the National Beauty Culturist League to Atlanta. He also thanks Mrs. Whickham for the support that her organizations has given to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Handwritten notecard regarding Realism

Index card written by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The Second Sunday After Easter

Sunday, April 28, 1968

The preacher begins by reminding the audience about various forms of evil, the church's mission to help humans obtain heavenly rights and other topics from the previous week's sermon. After recapping last Sunday's sermon, the preacher uses the Word of God to answer the question, "How should Christians react to the afflictions they suffer in the world?" The three answers to this question are broken up into three different sections and explained in depth by the speaker.

Otherworldliness

Dr. King quotes the Epistle of Clement and Friedrich von Hügel's "Eternal Life."

Letter from Larry M. Otter & Alan Aftanski to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mount Saint Mary's College's Young Democratic and Young Republican Clubs inform Dr. King of their preparation for the National Collegiate Primary, Choice '68. Dr. King has been named a candidate in the mock election, so the organizers request information about his views. They also tell Dr. King that a speaking engagement can be arranged if Dr. King's schedule brings him to the Maryland area.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK

An anonymous person wrote this letter to Dr. King, telling him that he is "directly responsible" for the murder of a 16 year old boy in Memphis, Tennessee.

Letter from a Concerned Christian to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1958

This letter penned by "Concerned Christian" informs Dr. King of a change in the course of the Civil Rights Movement. The "Concerned Christian" makes note of the increased amount of violence in the city of Baltimore and reprimands Dr. King's "reduced faith in God."

Photograph Outline for "Why We Can't Wait"

This draft outlines the images and captions used in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait." Some of the material incorporated includes images and descriptions of Dr. King at the 1963 March on Washington, the Birmingham Campaign, other heavily involved civil rights leaders, and Dr. King's family.

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Faith and Reason

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Wednesday, August 17, 1966

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.