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Letter to Twelve Southern Governors

Dr. King addresses twelve southern governors regarding the urgency of a unification between the Negro community and government leaders. Dr. King requests a meeting between the governors and himself to address and resolve their issues concerning race relations.

Business Reply Envelope from Morehouse College

Atlanta, GA

This document is a postcard invitation to a breakfast at Morehouse College. Dr. King served as a member on the Morehouse Board of Trustees.

Letter from Gene Riley to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

Gene Riley writes Coretta Scott King requesting that she contribute to a spring planting project.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Freedom!: A Spiritual Inspiration

New York (NY)

Composer Kenneth A. Roane wrote the song "Freedom," which he dedicated to the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967
Brooklyn, NY

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Meet the Press

Sunday, August 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., NIGERIA, California (CA)

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Thomas Elliott Huntley, member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Introduction to Philosophy." Brightman was a Christian theologan in the Methodist tradition.

Art

Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

Letter from J. Percy to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

J. Percy sends Dr. King an unpleasant note asserting that he is always complaining. Percy also wishes that Dr. King would stop talking about slums.

Letter from Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Tuesday, May 24, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Nickolas W. Dick writes Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Frank H. Epp extending an invitation to the Reverend to hold a series of meetings in Winnipeg. Dick closes by requesting confirmation of the extent of his stay.

Letter from H. Melvin Lieberstein to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Indiana (IN), Pennsylvania (PA)

H. Melvin Lieberstein thanks Dr. King for the personal letter Lieberstein received. Lieberstein adds quiet support to Dr. King, stating that in his chosen career field he regrets an inability to provide more active support.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
New York, NY, London, England

Joan Daves requests confirmation of a possible press conference, subsequent luncheon, and speaking engagement made by Dr. King. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), ALGERIA

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

Theology

Dr. King comments on theology and theological science.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Jaggart to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Mr and Mrs. C. Jaggart express how much they enjoyed one of Dr. King's messages.

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

Letter from E.E. Adams to MLK

California (CA)

E. E. Adams relates his thoughts about the constitutionality of urban renewal.

Committee to Adopt a Freedom Rider

Saturday, August 5, 1961
New York (NY)

This is a brochure to an event entitled the Card Party. This event is catered to raising funds to adopt a freedom rider.

A Plan for Establishing Independently Owned and Operated Businesses in Inner City Areas

New York (NY)

This document explains the need for independently owned and operated businesses in the city of Rochester, NY. It explains the path towards business development and the role that Kodak might play in encouraging that development.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Ruth W. Carr

Friday, May 19, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King sends Mrs. Carr his condolences for the death of her husband and thanks her for her contribution to the SCLC.

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Letter from Mildred R. Morris to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 27, 1963
Cincinnati, OH

Mildred R. Morris acknowledges receipt of a letter from Dora McDonald. She expresses her excitement regarding the possibility of meeting and informs McDonald about her new rates as a Professional Placement Counselor.

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

January Program of the Emancipation Celebration

Monday, January 2, 1961
Georgia (GA)

This program of the Emancipation Celebration in Savannah, Georgia features Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Letter from Linda Frawley to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968
Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

Linda Frawley, the campus coordinator for Suffolk University, requests any "pseudo-campaign" materials that Dr. King may be able to send. The materials are to be used in the National Intercollegiate Presidential Primary, sponsored by Time Magazine.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962
South Africa, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), London, England, GHANA, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.