Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"Florida (FL)"

Telegram from Memphis Sanitation Workers' to MLK

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Members of the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike express an urgent need for Dr. King to travel to Memphis in order to aid them in their crusade.

Letter from Mrs. Cyrus Eaton to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Eaton wrote this letter praising Dr. King for his remarks on Face the Nation. Mrs. Eaton states that Dr. King is indebted to him for always voicing his wisdom.

Fascism

Dr. King paraphrases one of Benito Mussolini's thoughts on fascism in "The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.

MLK in his Study

This is a photograph of Dr. King in his study in Atlanta.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

Auguste Comte

Dr. King writes of Comte's views of the relationship between the theological, the metaphysical and the scientific worlds.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

Redwood City, CA Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 1967

At the bottom of this clipping, from the Redwood City, California Tribune, is a brief update on the release of Dr. King's final book. The book entitled: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", according to the tribune, anticipated that it would be a very must-read publication.

Letter from John Roney to Dr. King

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Mr. Roney explains to Dr. King that the government will create oppressed social hierarchy within society. As a result, he requests that Dr. King responds to his plea or he will be believe that the rumors of government oppression are true.

Letter from C. Elden to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

C. Elden urges Dr. King to speak with Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, about his refusal to be drafted into the military. Elden believes that Dr. King's influence will change Clay's mind and make Clay realize that citizens "must fight."

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Letter to Rev W. Harold Row from MLK about the Annual Brethren Service Dinner

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

In this letter to Reverend Row, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Brethren Service Dinner due to previous commitments with the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Letter from Marcel Bernfeld to MLK

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Mr. Bernfeld writes Dr. King, letting him know that he published some of his work. He also asks Dr. King's permission to publish the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in its entirety, with an introduction and notes. He encloses copies of his own speech for Dr. King's reading pleasure and expresses his well-wishes in closing.

God (I Chronicles)

Dr. King interprets I Chronicles 16:14 as implying monotheism.

Program for Mass Meeting with MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Dr. King spoke at the Scott High School Field House in Toledo. Mayor John W. Potter opened the program with an official welcome to the city and Rev. Robert Culp welcomed the prticipants on behalf of the Toledo Chapter of the NAACP. Rev. B. F. Wright, the President of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Toledo and Vicinity, gave the benediction.

Letter from W. Warner Beckett to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967

Mr. Beckett, a publisher at New Lady Magazine, writes to Dr. King requesting that he lead an "armada" of people with the intent of focusing on businesses and industries. Mr. Beckett believes that Negroes and concerned whites should fight against large businesses by "diverting money from key industries."

Telegram from The Mathis Family to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963

The Mathis family sends their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Dr. Helen Curth to the MLK Memorial Fund

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Dr. Curth encloses a donation for the Martin Luther King Memorial Fund. She requests that a receipt for $5 be sent to each of her two grandsons so that they may feel connected to Dr. King's memory.

SCLC Executive Staff Meeting Agenda

This executive staff meeting agenda for the S.C.L.C. provides a list of topics to be discussed as well as some organizational strategies for the organization.

The Kinship Between the Labor Unions and Negroes

Dr. King presents a speech at the United Auto Workers Convention in May 1961, which acknowledges the new challenges faced by factory workers because of technological advances that threaten to leave them jobless. He draws a parallel between the plight of auto workers and the Negro experiences of disenfranchisement in the US to highlight the potential for alliance between the two groups.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. R. Schippers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Rev. Young informs Dr. Schippers of arrival details for an upcoming trip to Amsterdam, Holland.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK about Selections from "Strength to Love"

Friday, December 30, 1966

In this letter, Campe encloses payment for the rights of an English-language textbook to reprint five selections from Dr. King's "Strength to Love".

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Bible

Dr. King quotes John Ruskin and Thomas Carlyle on the significance of the Bible.