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"GEORGIA"

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah demonstrating God's wrath.

Handwritten Notecard Defining Philosophy

Dr. King documents a quote from a book entitled "Philosophy of Religion".

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Selma, AL

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

The World of the Patriarchs

EGYPT, SYRIA, GREECE

Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Letter from Bible Student to MLK

ISRAEL

The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Mail and Messages Note to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Kansas (KS), Philadelphia, PA, Minnesota (MN), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY)

This is a list of mail and messages for Dr. King dated 12/12/67. It includes a letter from his literary agent Joan Daves about a speech to be given at the University of Kansas, a publication from the Southern Regional Council, and phone calls about speaking engagements and media inquiries.

Theory of Perception in the Light of the Fallacy of Misplaced Concreteness

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead's "fallacy of misplaced concreteness" as described in "Science and the Modern World."

Today's Hero - The Negro Child

New Orleans, LA, Arkansas (AR), Nashville, TN, North Carolina (NC)

The "Southern Patriot" newsletter of the Southern Conference Educational Fund published this advertisement featuring the photo of two small children. The advertisement includes a heartfelt thank you to those many Negro students (trailblazers) brave enough to endure racial harassment and physical danger in the struggle to integrate schools in the South.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Letter From Kivie Kaplan to MLK

Sunday, February 5, 1967
Florida (FL), JAMAICA, New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Kaplan thanks "Coretta and Martin" for their cards and acknowledges the preparation of Dr. King's fourth book.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
New York, NY

This New York writer castigates Dr. King and refers to him as "the worst phoney [sic] in the country."

Sin

Dr. King outlines some insights regarding moral duty and sin.

Hate Mail Regarding Race Relations to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
New York (NY)

The author write Dr. King to express his disdain for the Negro race. Stating that Negros are ?savages?, the author proclaims that the White race will forever remain in power.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King records notes on the individualization and participation of man.

Letter from Ernest Dale to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Professor Dale asks to reschedule an appointment with Dr.King. He had been unable to keep the original appointment because he was not in Atlanta.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

Chicago, IL, California (CA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Illinois (IL)

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
New York, Connecticut (CT), Chicago, IL

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Victor Capron Requests MLK Deliver Condolences to Lt. Col. Odumeguu Ojukuu

Thursday, March 14, 1968
BELGIUM

Capron requests that Dr. King deliver a personal message of condolence to the President of Biafra, Lt. Col. Odumegwu Ojukwu. MLK's trip to Biafra in March of 1968 was canceled.

Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

An Interview With MLK

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Letter from Major E. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965
Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL)

Rev. Major Smith briefly informs Dr. King of the support he has given Dr. King's program and asks him to reconsider the Alabama Boycott. He explains that he does not agree with this decision and states that this may cost him some supporters.

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966
Utah (UT)

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York, NY

This debit memo from Joan Daves informs Dr. King of the expenses for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Thursday, June 30, 1966
New York (NY)

This royalty statement from Harper and Row, Publishers Incorporated, details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" for the six month period ending June 30, 1966.

J. M. Douglas Expresses Concern about the Influx of Cuban Imigrants

Wednesday, January 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, CUBA, Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

J. M. Douglas writes Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to express his concern for the influx of Cubans in America. He fears that jobs for young Negros are at stake and suggests that Dr. King include the concern in his demands for the March on Washington.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968
Georgia (GA)

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965
VIETNAM, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.