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Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Arizona (AZ), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

An anonymous individual conveys to Dr. King his frustrations with President Johnson and the Vietnam War.

Telegram From Avanta Williams to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960
Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA

Avatna Williams, family and friends send their thoughts and prayers to Dr. King when they heard that he would serve a year in jail.

Operation Breadbasket As Vision, Promise and Hope

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This report discusses the socio-economic position of Negroes as it relates to education achievement, employment opportunities, and access to power and societal institutions.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

Chicago, IL

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

MLK Note Card - "Paint"

In this note card, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on "...shin[ing] only for the life of imitative mediocrity."

Letter from John Moody

Thursday, February 22, 1968
New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Maryland (MD)

Mr. Moody discusses his hopes of creating an event that will demonstrate the phenomenon of Harumbe, with hopes of it becoming a National holiday. The proposed name of this day is "Harumbe", a Swahili term meaning Let's Get Together. Moody suggests May 19, the birthday of Malcolm X, as the date for this event to occur. Additionally, Moody provides an outline for the festivities, and requests that Dr. King contribute his suggestions after reviewing the proposal.

Letter from J. R. Coan to Alumni of Turner Theological Seminary

Friday, January 12, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Coan, acting director of Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center, issued this correspondence to all of Turner Theological Seminary's Alumni. The letter announces the details and record of minutes for the Seminary's Third Annual Founders' Day Convocation.

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

CANADA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.

Autograph Request

GERMANY

German citizen, Reinhold Kohl, requests an autograph of Dr. King for his collection.

Letter to Congressman Elect Adam C. Powell

New York (NY)

This letter from constituent Robert Greene urges Adam C. Powell to reopen his case so that he may be cleared of any wrong doing. Greene states how important Powell is to the Black community and the State of New York. Greene provides information that may assist Powell with his case.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

Thursday, July 12, 1956
Montgomery, AL, CHINA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, JAPAN

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins, Chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, invites Dr. King to serve as a member of the conference's executive committee.

Essay on Violence and Nonviolence

The impractical and immoral effect of violence and testimony to the moral power and efficiency of nonviolence are discussed in this essay. Violence is recognized as achieving social justice with great results, but not without damage to society. Although a much tougher way of seeking social justice, nonviolence is a more satisfying lasting solution.

Letter from MLK to James K. Shipman

Friday, November 17, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King thanks James Shipman, Chairman of the Organization Committee of the Ohio Association of Community-Junior Colleges, for an invitation to speak at Cuyahog Community College. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to schedule demands related to planning for the first four months of 1968.

SCLC Staff Meeting - Suggestions and Assignments

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

These notes from a SCLC staff meeting discuss a plan of action for the Chicago Campaign and the Soldier Field rally. The document covers an array of topics, such as advertising, speaking engagements and smaller rallies.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ)

Cornelius E. Gallagher writes Dr. King concerning the signing of the discharge petition concerning home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Governor Rockefeller writes Dr. King expressing his support for the work King is doing and asserts his desire to assist him in any way.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Rita Machelle Foster to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963
Chicago, IL

Rita Machelle Foster, an eighth grade student a Harvard Elementary School, requests any information or documentation provided by Dr. King for her composition on Negro History Week. Ms. Foster asks that Dr. King provide a photograph and discuss the James Meredith situation.

Mississippi College Gets Poverty Role

Friday, October 7, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) moves to remove the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) as the sponsor of pre-school antipoverty programs in the state. Sargent Shriver announces that Rust College will receive funding to administer the Head Start program in Marshall and Lafayette Counties of Mississippi. CDGM was one of the most important Head Start initiatives in the country, providing early childhood education, nutritional services, health care and other services to thousands.

CEP News

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), New York (NY), Tennessee (TN), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Monday, May 16, 1966
Virginia (VA)

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Thursday, May 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), HUNGARY

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Celsus

Dr. King writes about Celsus, a second century Greek philosopher who opposed Christianity.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Detroit, MI, San Francisco, CA

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Telegram from Georgia AG Eugene Cook to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963

This telegram is addressed to Dr. King and originates from Mr. Cook, Attorney General of Georgia. The telegram requests for Dr. King to meet with Mr. Cook to discuss and clarify comments Dr. King made to the news media. Mr. Cook cites "under provision of the 1953 Subversive Activities Act" as the basis for such a meeting.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.