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"GEORGIA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Alfred T. Davies

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Alfred T. Davies that Dr. King will not be able to submit a sermon for "The Church Speaks on Race." Dr. King has just published "Strength to Love," which includes his sermons on many of the aspects of the civil rights movement.

Promotional Ad in Publisher's Weekly for "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, March 8, 1964

This ad, published in Publisher's Weekly, serves to promote Dr.King's book "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Harold Franklin to MLK

Saturday, May 2, 1964

Harold Franklin expresses appreciation to Dr. King for granting him scholarship aid.

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Letter from Herbert Wright to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Herbert Wright writes Dr. King to discuss economic development proposals for the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Mr. & Mrs. Silverboard

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. King forwarded this telegram to the Silverboard family of Atlanta, Georgia, in 1969. She wanted to convey sympathy for the death of their father and hoped that the family would find comfort. The spiritual bond of love, according to Mrs. King, is a mechanism that unites families during times of sorrow.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack H. O'Dell

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

In response to recent allegations, Dr. King and members of the SCLC Administrative Committee conduct a formal investigation on Mr. O'Dell's reported association with Communist affiliates. Dr. King regrettably informs him that due to this speculation, despite lack of concrete results, he must permanently resign from his position with the SCLC's New York office.

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.

Thank you Letter from MLK

Friday, January 26, 1968

Thank you Letter from MLK to Dr. Jones at Morehouse College for an autographed copy of "A Candle In The Dark"

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".

Letter from Southern Junior High School to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967

R. E. Lyles, Principal of Southern Junior High School in Columbus, Georgia, requests that Dr. King provide biographical information and a photograph for the Muscogee County School District's Annual Social Science Fair.

Protagoras

Dr. King writes about Protagoras’ view that appearance is reality.

Revolution and Redemption

Sunday, August 16, 1964

This document contains the address, "Revolution and Redemption," given by Dr. King in Amsterdam. Dr. King discusses the concerns of the "Gospel of Jesus Christ." He states there are two aspects of the world that must never be forgotten: "this is God's world," and that Jesus Christ gave his life for redemption.

Telegram from Civil Rights Leaders to President Kennedy

Monday, September 16, 1963

Members of the SCLC and prominent civil rights leaders request an immediate conference with President John F. Kennedy regarding the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Letter from Berta Reller to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

Berta Reller writes a letter to Dr. King regarding an article she has enclosed. The letter discusses recent riots and that extremists from the left and right wings are motivating them. Reller believes that there should be more focus on education.

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

Letter from MLK to the Grand Textile Corporation

Friday, February 24, 1967

Dr. King thanks the Grand Textile Corporation for their contribution to the SCLC.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jessie Stephens

Wednesday, September 16, 1964

Miss McDonald informs Jessie Stephens that Dr. King is out of the country, but she recommends that Mrs. Stephens contact Dr. King's lawyer, Chauncey Eskridge, for help.

Court Summons for MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

The Circuit Court of Dallas County issues Dr. King a summons to appear before the Grand Jury.

Letter from Violet Panzram to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Panzram praises Dr. King for his "strong statements" against the Vietnam War and includes a contribution for his "peace efforts."

The Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storthing

Thursday, January 30, 1964

The members of the Swedish Parliament honors Dr. King for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. The Parliament expounds on the prosperous and revolutionary efforts of Dr. King and encourages him to continue the methodology of nonviolence introduced by Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. King is further highlighted for his works in the United States and his contributions to eradicate racial discrimination.

Immortality

Dr. King writes a quote from Goethe from Johann Peter Eckermann's "Conversations of Goethe."

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

Letter from John A. Clark to MLK Regarding Scriptures, Spiritual Advice and Prayer

Friday, June 9, 1967

In this letter, Reverend John A. Clark provides spiritual advice, scripture and prayer for Dr. King during hard times as well as for preparation of the future. Reverend John A. Clark also mentions starting a revival and revisiting Washington to D.C. to preach for a cause.