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Acrostic Poem About MLK

California (CA)

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.


Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr on the subject of Freudianism from "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from MLK Regarding Chicago Movement Efforts, Torn Document

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

With a future of brotherhood, freedom and harmony among all at the core of the fight for democracy, Dr. King, in this excerpt, stresses the need for support in the fight against injustice.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the German publishers and their inquiry about a special introduction for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait." Joan Daves also asked for Dr. King's opinion about whether the press conference should be in Berlin or elsewhere.

Letter from James Schlatter to MLK

Friday, December 17, 1965
Illinois (IL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

James E. Schlatter, a student at Illinois State University, writes to Dr. King to request his comment on the effects of civil disobedience on law and order for his term paper on law enforcement.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on social ethics from the Book of Nahum.

Letter from Reverend Aaron T. Hoggard to MLK

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Aaron T. Hoggard, Minister of the Washington Street A. M. E. Zion Church, encloses a contribution to assist with Dr. King's efforts to help blacks achieve liberty.


Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's concept of religion.

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

Monday, May 22, 1967
New York (NY), London, England, Pennsylvania (PA)

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Wilma Wolsink to MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1966

Wilma Wolsink, an eleven-year-old girl from Holland, writes to Dr. King to express her support. She also requests an autographed photograph.

Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960
Louisville, KY, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL)

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.

Colwell, Ernest Cadman

Dr. King references Ernest Caldwell's book "Toward Better Theological Education."

Letter from George T. Altman to MLK

Monday, September 12, 1966
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Attorney George Altman informs Dr. King of a US District Court order preventing him from taking Dr. King's deposition concerning whether or not people of color should have the same military service requirements as whites. Altman presents the case that people of color were colonial subjects rather than citizens, but the District Court ruled against his position. Altman plans to fight this ruling in an appeal the following month.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

Letter from Stuart E. Atkinson to the SCLC

Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Stuart E. Atkinson sends a donation to the SCLC and requests the address to which he should send donated clothing and toys.

The American Dream


The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Mr. Shriver to offer assistance to farmers who have been treated unfairly.

Telegram from The United Ministries of Texas Southern University to MLK

Tuesday, May 19, 1964
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

The United Ministries of Texas Southern University thanks Dr. King for his visit to the school to speak on education and the "greater concern for human dignity and social rightness." They feel that Dr. King's appearance has made a significant impact on the school and the students.

SCLC Revel Report


In this report, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference provides the strategic planning for a nationwide program aimed at educating African Americans on nonviolence principles.

Southern Presbyterian Church Donation to SCLC

Friday, October 27, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

John Randolph Taylor informs Dr. King of a donation from "A Fellowship of Concern" and members of the Presbyterian Church U.S. to the SCLC.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Tuskegee, AL, Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Letter from Edward O'Brien to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Connecticut (CT)

Edward O'Brien writes Dr. King inquiring about the release of his new book, as he is unable to find it in bookstores.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Affidavit of Theo R. Wright

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

In an attempt to redirect the focus of Negro students in Birmingham, Superintendent Theo R. Wright presents a sworn affidavit detailing his responsibilities and plans to revitalize the educational direction of Birmingham Public Schools.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an issue of Cuadernos, which printed a Spanish version of his Berlin address about President Kennedy. A copy of "Why We Can't Wait" is sold to Figaro Litteraire.

Holiday Card to Mrs. King

This holiday card was sent to Mrs. King from the Miller Family.

Letter from Gail Lamb to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Gail Lamb requests information from Dr. King for her research on prejudice, especially on "manifestations, kinds, and objects of prejudice."

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Colorado (CO), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gay to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963
Detroit, MI

Britt and Hagel Gay write Dr. King enclosing a contribution to help him in his "wonderful work."