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Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Invitation from Earl S. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Earl S. Smith invites Dr. King to speak at Montevideo, Uruguay on the methods of nonviolence in Latin America.

Tests of Great Music

Dr. King lists five criteria to use to evaluate whether a piece of music is great. Great music should hold its appeal over time, connect different experiences, foster a deeper life experience, unify history and integrate the individual personality.

Men of Past and Present Pamphlet

This pamphlet features quotes 'Men of Past and Present,' including religious and political leaders, on democracy and cooperatives.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, February 29, 1968

This document is a letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Dr. King in response to a previous letter from Dr. King in regards to a pilgrimage to Washington, D.C..

Tenth Annual Convention

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Dr. King addresses the achievements the SCLC has accomplished over the past ten years at the Tenth Annual Convention in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King then speaks on the fact that all of the SCLC's achievements are accomplished through nonviolence.

Ravenswood Post: "New Book by Dr. King Is Published"

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

This document is an article on the subject of Dr. King's new book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article sketches an overview of the book and makes synopses of various chapters.

Letter from Donald Godbey to MLK Regarding Cooperation

Thursday, June 15, 1967

In this letter, Donald Godbey offers Dr. King various suggestions on how men and women of all backgrounds can join together in unity.

Highlander Center Press Release

This press release details the Highlander Center, an adult education center for people who come to learn how to deal with problems affecting their lives and communities, which was under investigation. The investigation was being conducted to determine if the Highland Center was integrated as stated in its charter.

Press Release and Interview from Radio Norway

Wednesday, December 9, 1964

Dr. King addresses the press the day before receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in a statement from Radio Norway.

Letter from Alice McBee to MLK

Wednesday, September 7, 1966

Alice McBee expresses her admiration for Dr. King and dedicates two of her poems to the King family.

Prospectus for Department of Affiliates

Herbert Coulton, Director of Affiliates, gives members of the SCLC a list of requirements for positions within the organization.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Letter from Howard Sandum to MLK

Friday, September 7, 1962

Howard Sandum of the Macmillan Company writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for an address that Dr. King delivered.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 8, 1964

In this letter,Joan Daves informs Dr. King that an offer for a Norwegian edition of "Strength to Love" has been made. Joan also mentions that contracts have been made for Dr.King to sign.

Anticipated Public School Desegregation in Southern and Border States

Thursday, August 22, 1957

This memorandum provides a list of schools and school systems expected to desegregate in September of 1957. The Southern Regional Council, Inc. also includes vital information concerning pending Negro applications for school admittance and schools actively involved in litigation.

Statement Concerning Skin Color Differences

The author expounds on the color differences of eyes, plants, and animals to identify the faulty logic of bigotry in America.

Letter From Jimmy Williams to MLK

Sunday, February 25, 1968

Jimmy Williams, a U.S. Air Force officer, writes Dr. King requesting assistance in protesting his unjust termination from Officers Training School.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

Chicago Freedom Movement on Open City Reform

The Chicago Freedom Movement requests that the city's mayor equally enforces the Chicago Fair Housing Ordinace.

Man

Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

Letter from Clara Urquhart to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Clara Urquhart invites Dr. King to speak at the Human Right Day Commemoration, sponsored by Amnesty International, on November 9, 1964.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet describes the SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The SCLC provides information on the purpose of the school, first class citizen preparation and the characteristics of an ideal candidate for training.

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

Telegram from Georgia AG Eugene Cook to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963

This telegram is addressed to Dr. King and originates from Mr. Cook, Attorney General of Georgia. The telegram requests for Dr. King to meet with Mr. Cook to discuss and clarify comments Dr. King made to the news media. Mr. Cook cites "under provision of the 1953 Subversive Activities Act" as the basis for such a meeting.

Letter from Andrew Young to Professor G. Kuiper

Tuesday, November 2, 1965

Andrew Young, the Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes Professor Kuiper of Vrije Universiteit expressing his contentment with pair's recent visit to Amsterdam. Young also inquires about the Dutch institution covering the civil rights leaders' travel expenses.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Letter from Margery Bray to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Margery Bray writes Dr. King discussing how the women in America were engaged in similar demonstrations to secure their right to vote. Bray states that legislation is the only way to efficiently change things, and admits that she has recently become an active voter.