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Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

Letter from Leroy Benefield to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
Texas (TX)

Mr. Benefield requests information on how Dr. King prepared his Old Testatment sermons.

Letter from MLK to Crawford Johnson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Crawford Johnson for an event hosted at the Palais des Sports in Paris, France.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Boston, MA, Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Dr. King's address to the Hungry Club highlights an array of issues that relate to America's "Moral Dilemma." Dr. King explains the three major evil dilemmas that face the nation: war, poverty, and racism.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

Thursday, May 28, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

Hell-for the Liberal

Dr. King quotes a definition regarding hell. The definition states that hell is a consequence not a punishment. The notecard ends with a statement about youth's perspective of the world.

Letter from Cantor Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 1, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom writes to Miss McDonald requesting some of Dr. King's biographical material. Cantor Mendelson also informs her that he has met with Dr. King's attorney, Clarence Jones, to discuss the "I Have A Dream" as a "basis of a musical work."

Atlanta Operation Breadbasket Bi-Annual Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Fred C. Bennette, Jr. issues the bi-annual report for the Atlanta Chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Bennette expounds on the mission of Dr. King and the SCLC to create economic opportunities through advances in employment.

Dr. Abernathy Says Full Steam Ahead in '67

Friday, January 6, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Lowndes County, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. Abernathy recaps accomplishments of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for 1966. He states several objectives for the organization's efforts for 1967.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY, Arkansas (AR)

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Peace of Mind

Dr. King quotes Marcus Aurelius about peace of mind.

Invitation from the United Federation of Teachers to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

The United Federation of Teachers invite Dr. King to their annual Spring Conference Luncheon. At this particular event, civil rights activist Bayard Rustin will be honored with the John Dewey Award.

Telegram from Clark Macgregor to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963
Mississippi (MS)

Clark Macgregor sends a telegram to Dr. King informing him of his vote against the dismissal of the Mississippi Challenge.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet encloses a clipping on the Soldier Field Rally for Dr. King. Kupcinet closes by requesting the Reverend's appearance on his television show.

Man: Origin, Limitations and Freedom

Dr. King quotes Bible passages that explore the value of man, the limitations of man, the relationship between soul and body, and the origin of man.

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964
New York (NY)

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Invitation from Douglas Davis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963
New York, NY, CANADA, New York (NY)

Douglas A. C. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at the University of Western Ontario's School of Business Administration. He explains that Dr. King's visit will be one of great pleasure and honor.

Telegram from Malcolm X to MLK

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY)

Malcolm X offers Dr. King assistance with the situation in St. Augustine, including the organization of self-defense units.

Van Til, Cornelius

Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King cites Cornelius Van Til's "The New Modernism."

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

New Jersey (NJ)

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

Letter from Mose Pleasure, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968
Memphis, TN, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Pleasure writes Dr. King to inform him of his decision not to accept employment with SCLC. He refers to an earlier visit with Dr. King and friends in Atlanta, and comments that the group's enthusiasm bodes well for the upcoming Poor People's March on Washington.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), VIETNAM

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Telegram from Rev and Mrs A C L Arbouin to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

Reverend and Mrs A.C.L Arbouin offer Dr. King spiritual encouragement during his time in Birmingham Jail.

Letter from George Carlson to MLK

Friday, September 28, 1962
Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

George Carlson informs Dr. King that he handled the public relations and publicity for his appearance in Seattle. In addition, Mr. Carlson notifies Dr. King that the Jewish Temple in Portland requests the status his availability for a speaking engagement.

Dr. King's Involvement with the Second Emancipation Proclamation

Saturday, March 24, 1962

This article states, Dr. King recently announced President Kennedy has request he submit for his signature a second Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."