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The A. Philip Randolph Institute

The A. Philip Randolph Institute was organized to mobilize labor, religious and other groups in support of the civil rights movement. Dr. King was a member of the Advisory Board.

Letter from the Frink Family to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1967

Father and husband John Frink, sends a $200 donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was made possible by not getting anyone any Christmas gifts. The author writes of a future intent to contribute physical aid to the organization in their hometown of Florida. In closing, Frink requests information regarding sponsorship of a needy family for the purpose of teaching his children how to be of service to others.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Helen E. Saum writes Dr. King concerning the issue of drop-outs and its affect on riots and demonstrations.

Letter From Paul H. Boase

Friday, October 13, 1967

Paul H. Boase writes Dr. King concerning a sermon, recording and publication that he would like to use to demonstrate that the Social Gospel is still alive.

MLK Draft - The Weakness of Liberal Theology

Dr. King analyzes the problems associated with liberal theology. According to his view, liberal theology, "seems to be too divorced from life."

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. W.E. Anderson

Friday, June 9, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to the wife of Dr. Anderson and assures her that they will continue the noble endeavors that Dr. Anderson began.

Letter from Vanessa Garrett to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968

Vanessa Garrett writes Dr. King discussing various problems African Americans face. She seeks advice on how to solve these issues.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

Imago Dei

From Luther's Commentary of Genesis, Dr. King records a description of "Imago Dei," which means the image of God. Martin Luther was an author, German priest, theologian and influencer of Dr. King.

Temple Sholom Concert Forum Committee Announces MLK as Guest Lecturer

Chicago's Temple Sholom encourages interested parties to reserve their tickets soon, given the widespread enthusiasm for Dr. King's upcoming speaking engagement.

Telegram from Terrence Hallinan to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Mr. Hallinan requests Dr. King's assistance in aiding a service member undergoing a "court martial for refusal to go to Vietnam."

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

Telegram from George Garabedian to MLK

Sunday, July 24, 1966

Mr. Garabedian, a tourist agent in Jerusalem and Jordan, requests that Dr. King allow him to make accommodations for his upcoming trip.

Dr. King Acceptance as an Honorary Member of Wellesley College

Dr. King often had delayed responses due to his strenuous schedule, traveling obligations, and completion of the necessary duties as the President of the SCLC. Dr. King's letter to Miss Knight provides an example of the unintentional unpunctuality as he accepts an award as an honorary member of Wellesley College class of 1966.

Letter from Ronald Bauer to MLK

Wednesday, January 20, 1965

Ronald Bauer congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. As President of the Inter American University, Bauer informs Dr. King of the institution's initiatives in the quest for peace. Two international conferences, sponsored by Inter American University, engages university students from all over the world. Bauer is embarking on a plan to establish his own international university and invites Dr. King to be part of a special International Advisory Council featuring notable world leaders.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

God

Dr. King quotes Plato's views regarding God.

Letter from Dr. King to Earnest Dale

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter serves to acknowledge Earnest Dale's missed call to Dr. King and to thank Professor Dale for his support.

Immortality

Dr. King writes that the belief in immortality by scholars in different disciplines suggests that while immortality cannot be proved nor has it been disproved.

Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Letter from Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin, the 37th district Representative from California, thanks Dr. King for the telegram urging him to sign the discharge petition for the home rule bill for the District of Columbia, and he lets Dr. King know he has already signed it.

SCLC Project Report

The staff of SCLC provides a memorandum report to supporters regarding the status of current programs and projects. Important financial facts about the organization are also included.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.