Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"GHANA"

Letter from MLK to Sara Mitchell

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Mitchell, a representative from the Atlanta Board of Education, for her recent letter acclaiming his book "Where Do We Go From Here." Dr. King states that the lack of material on Negro History and culture in America's public schools is "appalling" and children from all races will benefit from learning about another aspect of American culture and history.

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

Statement by Reverend Jesse Jackson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Reverend Jesse Jackson gives a report regarding SCLC's Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Jackson states, "There are no riotous fires set aflame in this country that can be put out with water from a rubber hose; the flames must be extinguished by money from an economic hose."

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

North and South

The SCLC newsletter informs its readers of the recent events that its members have taken part in. Hosea Williams went to Chicago to conduct a voter registration and voter motivation drive. Also, the SCLC's Operation Breadbasket, led by Jesse Jackson, made an agreement with a big food chain company. The company agreed to transfer some accounts from white banks to struggling Negro banks and to offer its Negro customers products manufactured by small Negro firms.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

Religious Index - MLK Notes

This document illustrates how to put together a sermon for religious services and contains notes from Dr. King.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Man: Origin, Limitations and Freedom

Dr. King quotes Bible passages that explore the value of man, the limitations of man, the relationship between soul and body, and the origin of man.

Letter from the Holy Name College to MLK

Friday, October 11, 1963

The Holy Name College requests Dr. King's written contribution for a new section in their publication entitled Interest Magazine. Interest Magazine is an international publication dedicated to the understanding and appreciation of theology. Dr. King has been selected to focus on the issue regarding Christianity and the American Negro. The college provides Dr. King with the restrictions of his essay and assures him that they will print his written work without editing for authenticity.

Letter from Annette P. Johnson to Reverend Charles C. Carpenter

Tuesday, May 14, 1963

Annette P. Johnson writes Bishop Carpenter concerning her initiative to seek better understanding of his status on supporting racial equality. Johnson believes that Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" was directed at Reverend Carpenter and other Southern clergymen like him.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Shaefer that Dr. King will be able to speak in Kennett Square in Pennsylvania.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Telegram from Charles McDew to MLK

Thursday, September 13, 1962

Charles McDew petitions the assistance of Dr. King in pursuing a federal investigation of the shootings of several civil rights activists in Mississippi and Southwest Georgia. Charles McDew issued this telegram as a representative of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

The Hard or the Easy Way?

Thursday, October 5, 1961

The Southern Regional Council discusses the topics of school segregation and integration in specific southern states and counties, especially Yancey County, North Carolina.

Letter from James Shaffer and James Barfield

Friday, July 29, 1966

Mr. Shaffer and Mr. Barfield both thank Dr. King and the SCLC for thier works for humanity.

Letter from Fred S. Bertsch Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965

Fred Bertsch Jr., Principal of the Holland School in Michigan, informs Dr. King that the school has made other arrangements for its commencement ceremony.

Letter from John H. Scott to MLK

John H. Scott writes Dr. King regarding his planned trip to the Holy Land. Scott expresses his admiration for Dr. King and seeks to join the tour.

Letter from Senator Thomas H. Kuchel to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

California Republican Senator Thomas H. Kuchel writes Dr. King thanking him his letter celebrating the recent passage in the Senate of the Civil Rights bill.

Letter from MLK to Debbie Steiner

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. King thanks Miss Steiner for her letter and explains how love is the way to overcome the injustices brought on by prejudice and ignorance. He writes that, though it can be difficult, she must direct her thoughts in a loving way towards those who mistreat her.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

Letter from MLK to Wesley Fisher

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the kind letter from Mr. Fisher. He also informs him that Aaron Henry has been absent and will probably reply about some donated clothing upon his return.

Letter from Peter Sevetnyk to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Peter Servetynk, a former Roman Catholic Priest from Canada, invites Dr. King to speak at a massive gathering in Toronto. He further thanks Dr. King for his charitable works and wishes there were more people of his stature.

Letter from Franz Jonas to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Franz Jonas invites Dr. King to the Vienna Festival to engage in the "European Talk" purposed to promote unity within the continent. Jonas comments that Dr. King's knowledge and experience qualifies him as a valuable candidate to participate in the talk.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. T. Kane

Monday, March 25, 1968

In this letter, dated March 25, 1968, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the Kane's generous contribution of one hundred dollars to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation.

Letter of Invite from M. J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

In this letter, M. J. Jones invites Dr. King and Mrs. King to be his guest at a dinner with Dr. L. Harold DeWolf. DeWolf is delivering three lectures over the course of two days, to which Dr. and Mrs. King are also invited.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Grand Hotel

Dora McDonald sends an additional Grand Hotel reservation request for the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies of December 1964.

Letter from George F. Berlinger to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Mrs. George Berlinger of the Nathan Hofheimer Foundation, informs Dr. King that the organization will not be including the SCLC in their budget. The Nathan Hofheimer Foundation sought to improve the living conditions of the underprivileged.