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Letter to MLK from Andrew W. Loewi

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Andrew W. Loewi writes Dr. King asking him to sign a petition against the Vietnam War.

Letter from David Mocine to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

David Mocine writes on the economic disparity in the United States regarding African Americans in relation to their percentage of the population.

Program From MLK's Nobel Peace Prize Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

This is the program from a Recognition Dinner honoring Dr. King sponsored by the Citizens of Atlanta following his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. It took place at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel and included an address by Dr. King.

Telegram from Robert L. Green, Floyd McKissack and Roy Wilkins to MLK

Mr. Wilkins, Mr. Kissack and Mr. Green express their viewpoint regarding restrictive racial policies towards the Negro, more specifically towards Negro women by members of the Women's City Club of Detroit. The author encourages a dismembership from the club based on their findings.

Letter Dated 2/1/63 from Frank Elliott to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963

Frank Elliot is writing to notify Dr. King that he has received the revised sermon "Antidotes of Fear," and it will be in the galley proofs. Elliot states that the galley proofs will be sent to Dr. King's office no later than Feburary 7th. He wants to meet with Dr. King to discuss any problems that may arise.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

The New Leader: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, April 16, 1963

The New Leader, a New York-based biweekly magazine, published Dr. King?s Letter from Birmingham City Jail. This historic piece is a response to the views of some fellow clergymen that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely.? King's critics had branded him an "outside agitator" and an extremist who should not be advocating lawbreaking. Dr. King responds with this letter and references prominent historical figures to counter these criticisms.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Evil

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion" on the topic of evil.

Telegram to MLK Regarding a Social Eruption in Chicago

Tuesday, June 14, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Dr. King a typed version of his statement on the violence occurring in a predominately Puerto Rican neighborhood in Chicago. Through the incident, Dr. King notes the callousness of law enforcement in the area.

Letter from John E. Smylie to MLK

Friday, May 31, 1963

In this letter, Chaplain Smylie requests for Dr. King to preach at Occidental College. Smylie states, "We would be honored to have you or one of your representatives at Occidental."

Appreciation Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

In this letter, Maurice Dawkins expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's statement that encouraged the Congress to support the war on poverty. He also expresses appreciation for Dr. King making the urgency of this matter clear to the world.

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Sunday, August 14, 1966

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Fiercely Upward and Other Newspaper Articles

This document contains a combination of two poems by a principle in Brooklyn, N.Y., and two articles highlighting significant upcoming events of 1963 and 1964. The first article announces the third printing of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" as well as information regarding the release of his forthcoming work "Why We Can't Wait." The second article reports on Mrs. Medgar W. Evers' speaking tour slated to take place in the fall of 1963, just a few months after her husband, the NAACP leader, was slain.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Letter from Ann Thompson to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Ann Thompson, a white woman, writes Dr. King expressing support and thanks for his recent speech on peace. Thompson states that Dr. King is one of the few great men living.

Letter from Sampson Oliver to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Sampson Oliver writes Dr. King expressing his feelings concerning the immoral notion of Vietnam War.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Mr. Charles Merrill, Headmaster of the Commonwealth School in Boston, MA, requests that Dr. King support Mr. Danilo Dolci's candidacy for the Nobel Peace Prize that year

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Letter from the American Embassy in New Delhi, India to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965

The Embassy of the United States invites Dr. King to come and visit India for at least a month. He can lecture in his special areas of interests. The embassy states that the best time to come is between November and April.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

Harper and Row Publishers send an itemized royalty statement to Dr. King for his book titled, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Calvinism

Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Book of Job, elaborating on the goodness of God and it's correlation with human suffering.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Letter from Billy E. Bowles to MLK about an Interview

Monday, March 27, 1967

In this letter Billy E. Bowles requests an interview with Dr. King. Bowles is especially interested in Dr. King's perception of the new governor, Governor Maddox.

Letter from Arthur Abba Goldberg to Dr. King about Conducting Seminars for SCLC

Friday, January 12, 1968

Arthur Abba Goldberg, Deputy Attorney General for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs and the Housing Finance Agency is sending a copy of his resume to Dr. King, and expresses his interest in conducting seminars in the field of housing or housing finance.

Religion and Peace of Soul

Dr. King cites a quotation from Jesus Christ that discusses peace, the "chief legacy" of religion. Dr. King explains that inner peace is maintained regardless of the external adversity one endures in life. Dr. King continues to elaborate on the necessary functional relationship one must have with God. He further describes the association between good, evil, innocence and more.

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.