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"GHANA"

Ezekiel and Sin

Dr. King paraphrases the biblical verse Ezekiel 20:21. He states that the prophet makes it clear that among the greatest sins of the Israelites was "profaning the Sabbath."

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Letter from Ellen Bandler to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 11, 1962

Ellen Bandler writes Miss McDonald about a letter that was received on September 10, 1962 concerning the publication of Mr. Killens' book being postponed until January 1963.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

MLK - Notes on "Highest Value"

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's focus on the concept of "highest value" in its various iterations.

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Anna Mull Jones to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Anna M. Jones informs Dr. King that she will pray for him while he is in jail, but she also requests that he read the history of the United States and reread the Constitution. She asserts that the Republican Party was created for the express purpose of halting the spread of slavery.

On Being A Good Neighbor

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Miss Mahalia Jackson in Concert

Sunday, December 1, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference presents Miss Mahalia Jackson in concert, marking "another milestone in her personal dedication to the drive for complete freedom for all humanity."

Letter From Clifford Alexander Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Clifford Alexander Jr. thanks Dr. King for supporting him in his nomination as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Letter from Robert Stock to MLK

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Robert Stock sends Dr. King a copy of a magazine called "Petroleum Today." The magazine offers their audience public information about the oil industry as well as human interests including education, art, and history.

Letter from Cornell Talley to MLK

Tuesday, April 17, 1962

Cornell Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, writes Dr. King as a reminder of his interest in the Reverend's cause and inquires about the SCLC's fundraising efforts.

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

Tuesday, September 10, 1963

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Thursday, May 13, 1965

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

Press Release Regarding Child Development Group of Mississippi

Friday, September 30, 1966

The CDGM Board of Directors expresses their outrage over being replaced by the group "Action for Progress in Mississippi." They feel that Sargent Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed the group without their input and in violation of the OEO's stated policies.

Slogans Approved by The Spring Mobilization Committee

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee, which sought to end the war in Vietnam, compiles a list of approved slogans and placard designs.

Trinity

Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

Royalty Statement for Where Do We Go From Here

Friday, August 4, 1967

Dr. King is receiving a check in the amount of $1048.50 in advance for the German Language edition of Where Do We Go From Here.

Letter from Dick Hall to MLK

Dick Hall, Group Leader with the Chicago area Salvation Army, writes Dr. King to inform him of a program the daycare center conducts that caters to children in the surrounding area. Mr. Hill also requests Dr. King's autograph for a project display the children in the program are constructing.

Royalty Summary for MLK from J. Campe

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

This royalty statement, from J.Campe, details Dr. King's sales and earnings from the French edition of "The Strength to Love", during the given time period.

The Negro Heritage Library

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

People in Action: Most Abused Man in Nation

Saturday, March 31, 1962

This article by Dr. King, published in his "People in Action" series in the New York Amsterdam News, describes the national and local reaction to the Birmingham jailing of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and J. S. Phifer.

Selma to Montgomery Commemorative Rally Suggestion

This outline features a tentative agenda, statement of purpose, and key logistical information pertaining to the commemorative rally celebrating the completion of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.