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Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Review of "Why We Can't Wait"

A preview of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appearing in TIPS, highlights specific reasons why the American Negro is so unwilling to accept the system of gradualism as a way of obtaining his rights.

Letter from Julia Smith to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1962

Julia Smith asks Dr. King to pray for her because she wants to study nursing at Michigan State University, a predominately white school at the time. She also reminds Dr. King of their previous encounter in St. Louis, Missouri where she shook his hand.

Relation Between Eternal Objects and Actual Occasions

Philosophically rooted, the set of notes on this series of cards explores metaphysical claims for the understanding that each "eternal object" is necessarily connected to an "actual occasion." Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" and speaks to the actualization of an event as result of possibilities.

Man

Dr. King writes about man's estimation of finiteness and freedom.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marilyn Coulter

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dora McDonald encloses an informational packet from Dr. King to Marilyn Coulter. Dr. King's only request for Coulter is that when she uses the information she cites the source from which it derives.

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

Letter from Nippon Television Corporation

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Producer Yasuo Yamanaka acknowledges Dr. King's consideration of an invitation to appear on his television program in Tokyo, Japan.

The Many Faces of Black Power

The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1961

In this letter, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King with an enclosed check to assist with the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Carl Andrew Moore

Friday, April 26, 1968

Carl Andrew Moore, from the University of the Pacific, in Stockton, California, expresses his support of Rev. Ralph Abernathy's leadership during these trying times.

Congratulatory Letter from YWCA to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

The YWCA congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Friday, September 8, 1961

Vernon R. Byrd, a fellow Boston University graduate, invites Dr. King to Bermuda to be a speaker for Men's Day at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Letter from John H. Britton, Jr. to MLK about a Photograph

Monday, December 21, 1964

In this letter John H. Britton, Jr., managing editor of JET, encloses a copy of a photograph of Dr. King reading a novel, "The Prize," in a hospital bed. The photograph was sent to Dr. King after the author of the novel, Irving Wallace, also requested a copy.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

This contract outlines the details of a speaking engagement for Dr. King on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County Center.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. Letter to MLK

Saturday, November 18, 1967

The National Association of Negro Musicians, Inc. is an organization dedicated to educating the youth through their distribution of scholarships. Wilson W. Woodbeck informs Dr. King that the organization will be honored to have him as an honorary member as they are entering into the third annual scholarship concert.

Memorandum Regarding California Fund Raising Meeting for SCLC

Monday, March 7, 1960

Dr. King addresses Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy informing him of the transportation cost and hotel expenses for his trip to California.

Letter from E. Rawley to MLK

E. Rawley writes Dr. King stating, "you are judged by the company you keep." Furthermore, Rawley asserts that King will end up a "nothing" when he is on the brink of fame and respect.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Letter from Otis J. Guidry to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Otis Guidry writes Dr. King requesting some campaign material "for an effective show of support for [his] candidacy" for the Choice '68 elections.