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Definition of History

Dr. King explains a definition of history.

Letter from Diane McFadden to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Diana McFadden requests information from Dr. King regarding his most significant personal characteristic.

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card-1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Warren J. Day submits his annual contribution to the SCLC. He adds a small note thanking Dr. King for taking a strong role in the peace movement.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

J.H. Wheeler requests Dr. King's attendance at the Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting in New York City.

Syllabus in Preaching and Worship

This syllabus for the course "Preaching and Worship" details the topics to be covered during the course. The following key topics are included: The Preaching Ministry of the Church, The Preparation of the Sermon, and Worship.

Whitehead's Doctrine of Freedom

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead’s doctrine of freedom as described in “Science and the Modern World.”

Statement of Education and Experience

This is a statement outlining the education and experience of Lincoln Maynard Catchings.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. White

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that she should seek financial assistance from her local welfare office because the SCLC will not be able to provide that service.

Letter from John G. Kirk to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

John G. Kirk of Metromedia asks Dr. King to write an editorial for a future publication called "America Now." Dr. King's article is to be based on the assumption that it is the responsibility of the government to enhance the dignity of individual citizens.

New York Times: Johnson Asks $75 Million for Poverty Projects

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

This article, written by Joseph A. Loftus for the New York Times, discusses President Johnson's appeal to Congress for $75 Million for anti-poverty summer programs. Johnson's previous request for $1.6 Billion for the War on Poverty had been granted, and these additional funds would provide for pools, day care, and summer programs for areas of extreme poverty, particularly in the Delta of Mississippi. Senators Joseph Clark and Jacob Kavits, of Pennsylvania and New York, respectively, also appeal for anti-poverty funds.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Monday, January 18, 1965

Adlai Stevenson, US Ambassador to the United Nations, thanks Dr. King for a previous letter and for Dr. King's attendance at a reception at the United States Mission. Stevenson also congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Postcard From Jesse Jackson to MLK

Jesse Jackson doubts that Dr. King will be able to bring God to Albany, Georgia.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, June 13, 1963

Dr. King informs President Kennedy that he will not be in attendance at a meeting with religious leaders due to another commitment.

The American Dream Outline

Dr. King outlines his "American Dream" speech on the back of letterhead from the Bellevue Stafford hotel. Dr. King writes about a "massive action program" to address injustice in America.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King writes notes regarding the story of Jesus and the healing of the paralytic. Jesus asked the crippled man, "will thou be made whole?" Dr. King states that some people are happy to be crippled because they lack the responsibilities of life that a healthy man has, and many people cater to their needs, but cautions against this attitude.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Monday, January 15, 1968

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

Letter from Alice B. Bye to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Alice B. Bye requests that Dr. King send information and a picture for her school report.

Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Letter from Betty Velazquez to Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Betty Velazquez, a student from New York City, sends her condolences to Mrs. King following the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Adlai Stevenson of the United Nations informs Dr. King that their meeting will have to be rescheduled due to his duties as UN Security Council President. Stevenson wishes to converse with Dr. King about issues relating to the continent of Africa.

Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.