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MLK Advocates Registering to Vote

Dr. King urges individuals to join the "march to Freedom" by becoming a registered voter. Dr. King asserts that voting will help educate children, obtain a minimum wage law, and create the opportunity for better medical care.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

Letter from Rev. Robert E. DuBose, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966
Philadelphia, PA

The Rev. Robert E. DuBose Jr. offers a prayer to Dr. King, after his march in Jackson, Mississippi. Rev. DuBose was not able to attend the march.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

God (Malachi)

Dr. King references various Bible passages that are related to God.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

Letter from Cantor Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, February 1, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom writes to Miss McDonald requesting some of Dr. King's biographical material. Cantor Mendelson also informs her that he has met with Dr. King's attorney, Clarence Jones, to discuss the "I Have A Dream" as a "basis of a musical work."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
Chicago, IL

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss inform Dr. King that his recent broadcast on Face the Nation has reinvigorated their faith in the movement.

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

Sunday, April 1, 1962
Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Chattanooga, TN, Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Hawaii (HI), Jackson, MS, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Ohio (OH), Shreveport, LA, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
New York (NY), Tokyo, Japan, JAPAN

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962
Indiana (IN)

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958
Montgomery, AL

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Yvonne Hairston

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Dr. King addresses Ms. Hairston's concerns about his opposition to the war in Vietnam.

Special to the New York Times: A Cry of Hate or a Cry for Help

Alabama (AL), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, Baltimore, MD, California (CA), Selma, AL

Dr. King addresses the recent riots occurring in the county of Watts near Los Angeles. He believes the riots are not solely race-driven but are also motivated by unemployment. The riots are utilized as a way to be heard, and not as a way to destroy.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Monday, February 10, 1958
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Letter from Brigitte Horburger to MLK

GERMANY

Brigitte Horburger sends Dr. King a photograph of a black child and white child playing the piano together. Under the photograph it states, "To produce real harmony you must play both the black and white keys."

Letter from Samuel Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Samuel Abbott asks Dr. King for a personal favor in writing the preface for his recent publication.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

Stockholm, Sweden, Oslo, Norway

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

Letter from MLK to the Erie, Pennsylvania NAACP

Friday, March 30, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from Erie Branch of the NAACP.

Black is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful To Be Black

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH, Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA)

This staff newsletter "Black Is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful," published by the SCLC, explains the upcoming events that the organization has in store. The newsletter communicates as to who acquired new positions within the SCLC and speaks to how the SCLC wishes to continue with projects based in Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington through Operation Breadbasket.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes to Dr. King in appreciation for notice of the Selma to Montgomery March. He describes the leadership of Dr. King and others involved in the Civil Rights Movement as "the finest American tradition."

Letter Draft from MLK to Mrs. Lewiston

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Lewiston to inform her that he will not be able to assist her with her financial problems because of the financial burdens that have already been placed on SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Melvin W. Trent

Friday, November 26, 1965
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Dr. King recommends that Melvin W. Trent file a complaint with the Civil Rights Commission about the unjust labor situation in Newport News.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Tuesday, October 22, 1963
SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, ZAMBIA, SOUTH AFRICA

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.