Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"GREECE"

Letter from MLK to Saul S. Sherman

Monday, January 3, 1966

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Saul S. Sherman for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes how monumental the change for Negroes in the South has been in the last ten years and how revolutionary the future will be thanks to her generous donation.

Letter from Emerson College to MLK Regarding Speaking Invitation

Monday, November 20, 1967

Emerson College extends Dr. King an invitation to speak at their communication lecture series. The lecture coordinator, Vic Silvestri, assures Dr. King that he will be awarded both an honorarium and travel expenses if he accepts.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Foreword of "The Power of Nonviolence"

Thursday, January 1, 1959

This is a copy of a foreword written by Dr. King to Richard Gregg's "The Power of Nonviolence."

Letter from MIT/Harvard Joint Center for Urban Studies to MLK

Thursday, July 6, 1967

In this letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Director Daniel P. Moynihan asks Dr. King to assist him and his organization by advocating for an increase in funds for the 1970 Census. The purpose is to "improve the enumeration of Negroes, Puerto Ricans, and Mexican-Americans".

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. to MLK

Harry Van Arsdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO, informs Dr. King, who is in the Fulton County Jail, that ten thousand unionists in New York voted to support Dr. King's fight for "decency and democracy." The organization contributes $1000 to aid Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from Lia Bosonetto to MLK Regarding Langston Hughes

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Lia Bosonetto, a college student in Italy, writes Dr. King requesting information on Langston Hughes for her thesis.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

MLK - Notes on "Highest Value"

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's focus on the concept of "highest value" in its various iterations.

VFW Post 2156 to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966

The members of George Washington Carver Post VFW Post 2156 voice their support for Dr. King, along with a donation.

Hate Mail Regarding Race Relations to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

The author write Dr. King to express his disdain for the Negro race. Stating that Negros are ?savages?, the author proclaims that the White race will forever remain in power.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Board Members and Executive Staff

Friday, January 6, 1967

Rev. Ralph Abernathy informs the board members and executive staff of SCLC that Dr. King is taking a leave of absence for two months to write his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" During Dr. King's absence, Rev. Abernathy took over the activities of the SCLC.

Letter from Grace Graham to MLK

Tuesday, June 18, 1963

Grace Graham, Chairman in the School of Education extends an invitation for Dr. King to give a series of lectures at several colleges in the Northwest. In addition to the University Oregon, other colleges include Montana State and Portland State.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter from MLK to Paul Andrews

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Andrews' commitment to racial justice and expresses gratitude for his encouraging letter. Dr. King states that the most important contribution to justice anyone can make is a "thorough examination" of one's own behavior.

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Tuesday, August 20, 1963

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Irv Kupcinet of the Chicago Sun-Times extends an invitation to Dr. King for an appearance on his television show, after receiving word of the Reverend's presence in the city.

Jesus' Ethical Character

Dr. King documents biblical passages that highlight Jesus' virtues.

Clement of Alexandria

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on Clement of Alexandria.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Thursday, August 22, 1963

This letter announces that the Gandhi Society for Human Rights, Incorporated is sponsoring a benefit concert, for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, at Carnegie Hal,l in New York City. Harry Belafonte, Frank Sinatra and Lena Horne are listed as some of the spotlight performers for this concert.

Progress Report from Robert L. Green to SCLC Staff

Tuesday, September 12, 1967

Mr. Green sends this report to the SCLC staff concerning the Chicago Adult Education Project (CAEP). He writes of the problems and difficulties concerning black communities such as Lawndale, Illinois. He then goes on to describe what the major objective is and how the CAEP can help communities, like those in Lawndale. He proposes "to develop basic, needed educational tools to improve reading, writing, consumer and personal budget skills, and to provide the project with job-seeking skills."

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses royalties for Dr. King's "Why We Can?t Wait," and "Strength to Love."

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

International Convention of Christian Churches Session Schedule

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

This program for the International Convention of Christian Churches provides an itinerary for a one-day session taking place in Dallas, Texas. A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary, sends this final letter to coordinate all aspects and help guide participants. Dr. King is listed on the schedule as a guest speaker and intends to deliver an address entitled "Beyond Discovery Love."

Anonymous Letter of Support for Reverend Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

An unknown author warns Rev. Abernathy to protect himself from those who might try to harm him and other Negro civil rights leaders.

Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Letter from Larry Oaks to SCLC

Monday, April 20, 1964

A student from the University of Alabama requests information from the SCLC for a course on race relations.

Telegram from CEP & SCLC to Essie Bizzell

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff from the CEP and SCLC inform Essie Bizzell that a chartered bus will be leaving from the SCLC office for McIntosh, Georgia and they are taking care of all the expenses.