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Letter from The Norwegian Student Association to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Norwegian student representatives reference a letter from Hakon Knutsen of the American Baptist Convention, inquiring about Dr. King's availability to address student groups during his stay in Norway.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King shortly after President Kennedy's assassination to urge him to take precautions.

SCLC Answers Attorney General Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Mr. Clayton releases a statement concerning accusations made against Dr. King. In the statement, Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook states that Dr. King refused to give him information him concerning a known communist named Jack O'Dell. Dr. King confirms that he has, in fact, cooperated with Cook and that O'Dell no longer works for the organization.

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Telegram from Icabod Flewellen to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Icabod Flewellen welcomes Dr. King to Cleveland, Ohio.

Memorandum Regarding Fund Raising and Sale of Memorial Objects

Wednesday, May 8, 1968

William A. Rutherford alerts SCLC members that Dr. King's name is being used in various parts of the country to obtain a profit. These individuals have used the organization's name as well as that of the Poor Peoples Campaign. These actions are unlawful and have not been certified by SCLC's headquarters.

Letter from Patricia Reid to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Patricia Reid has mixed feelings about Dr. King and the position he has taken. Even though she and her husband agree with this stance on civil rights, they respectfully disagree on his position on the Vietnam War. The Reids believe that Dr. King shouldn't interfere with foreign policy unless he can come up with a viable solution to end the Vietnam War. However, they still feel compelled to contribute to the work of the SCLC, but warn Dr. King that other individuals may not be that sympathetic.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

Fact Sheet on the Southern Negro Vote

Fact sheet from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference summarizing the registered Negro voters in eleven states of the South for a period ranging from 1947 to 1956

Letter from Dr. Neil V. Sullivan to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Dr. Neil Sullivan requests that Dr. King write the foreword for his new book, "Set Our Children Free -- In Integrated Schools."

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Letter from Nina Brown of Penn State to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Nina Brown writes Dora McDonald in preparation for Dr. King's visit to speak at Pennsylvania State University. She further inquires about logistics pertaining to Dr. King's speech, publicity and members of his party.

Press Release Issued by MLK

Monday, June 5, 1961

The following document is a press release issued by Dr. King. In the first section, he comments on the success of various civil rights demonstrations across the nation. In the second section, of the press release, Dr. King makes a clear distinction between race riots and nonviolent movements in Alabama.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

SCLC Resolution on Afro-American Unity

Thursday, August 17, 1967

In this resolution approved at its Tenth Annual Convention, SCLC affirms the need for Afro-American unity. The organization commits to conduct regional unity conferences involving all sectors of the Negro community, hold Identity Workshops on history and culture, and develop economic and political power so that Negroes can own and control their own communities. The resolution concludes by affirming the importance of black spiritual power, economic power, and political power.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Letter from George D. Kelsey to MLK

Saturday, October 31, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. Kelsey applaud Dr. King on his nomination and receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Kelsey was Professor of Christian Ethics at Drew University.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty: Policies and Programs

Tuesday, October 13, 1964

This booklet outlining the priorities, policies, and programs of the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Jesse Jackson Gets New SCLC Assignment

Monday, November 21, 1966

The Chicago Daily Defender highlights Dr. King's appointment of Rev. Jesse Jackson as head of the Special Projects and Economic Development Department of the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Irving J. Block

Monday, May 16, 1966

Dora McDonald requests Rabbi Irving J. Block contact Stanley Levison, Dr. King's attorney in New York City.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Memo to Members of the National Board of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Friday, January 6, 1967

This letter from Richard W. Boone invites recipients to attend a workshop for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Job

Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

Periods of Greek Literature

Dr. King provides brief notes on three periods of Greek literature.

Letter from Schuyler Coward to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

Schuyler Coward encloses three cartoons that he drew to Dr. King. He expresses his wishes to serve Dr. King's organization and requests a swift response to his letter.