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Letter from Alfred Gallen to MLK

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

A Chicago native writes to Dr. King concerning his current social and political affairs. He suggests that Dr. King should redirect his efforts to empower the black community rather than utilizing government assistance. He asserts that his presence and activities have ignited negative race relations.

Blank Jury Questionnaire to MLK

Atlanta, GA

This Jury Questionaire was sent to Dr. King by The Fulton County Court House.

Letter from Walter Jackson to MLK

Thursday, March 11, 1965
California (CA), Berkeley, CA

Walter Jackson of Lincoln School in Berkley, California writes Dr. King extending his gratitude for the Reverend's efforts in Civil Rights.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), PUERTO RICO

Mr. Kirkpatrick thanks Dr. King for his address at the Assembly in Puerto Rico for the World Convention of Churches of Christ. He also encloses a monetary donation to care for his expenses and serve as an honorarium.

MLK's Gadsden, Alabama Rally Speech

Friday, June 21, 1963
Alabama (AL)

This transcript of Dr. King's address during the Gadsden, Alabama Rally addresses the ills of segregation in the South. He professes that the accusation of civil rights demonstrations being responsible for creating tension is equivalent to blaming the act of robbery on the wealth of man.

MLK Memorandum: Plans for Selma, Alabama

Tuesday, January 19, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King outlines his plan for civil rights goals in Selma, Alabama.

Telegram from Governor Carl Sanders to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965
New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

In this telegram, Governor Sanders informs Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. that he will not be able to attend Ebenezer Baptist Church's Annual Layman's Day.

CCCO Draft Constitution

Tuesday, November 29, 1966
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes this letter to members of the Agenda Committee for the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations in Chicago. As a member of the Committee, Dr. King receives this letter urging a review of the enclosed draft of the organization's new constitution. Proposed areas of focus outline delegated staff tasks, partnership with SCLC, and broadening membership opportunities.

Letter from Mrs. Ross D. Davis to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Davis invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker for the Women's National Democratic Club.

Nobel Foundation's Invitation to Dr. and Mrs. King

Stockholm, Sweden, New York, NY

The Consul General of Sweden requests the presence of both Dr. and Mrs. King. The Kings are offered an invitation to meet the director of the Nobel Foundation and attend a reception in New York.

Sin in Psalms

Dr. King writes notes on the topic of sin, quoting Psalm 51:5.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Letter from John A. McDermott to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago asks Dr. King, as a former John F. Kennedy award winner, to write a telegram of congratulations to the current nominee. This year's recipient, Reverend Richard Morrisroe, was shot and wounded in Alabama the previous summer while campaigning for civil rights.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Letter from MLK to Miss Read

In this handwritten draft letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Miss Read's "interest in and support of our work and the American Negroes [sic] struggle for freedom and dignity."

Letter from Alan and June Fite to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter dated April 19, 1967, Alan and June Fite commend Dr. King for his speech given at a peace demonstration on April 15 and request a copy of the speech.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Seminar in Social Philosophy Notes

Dr. King records notes for his Seminar in Social Philosophy course. These notes consist of readings by and related to ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Letter from Mount Olive Baptist Church to the SCLC

Saturday, October 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

The Mount Olive Baptist Church of Sharpsburg express their appreciation and support of the SCLC's nonviolent movement. The church encloses a check and hopes that the organization will maintain clarity in the progression of a "true democracy."

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.

Note on MLK Recorded Statement

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Virgina Kassel sends a transcript of a recorded statement by Dr. King. Ms. Kassel provides Dora McDonald of the details related to statement and apologies for any errors on the transcript document.

Letter from TIME Magazine to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
New York, NY

James Shepley, publisher of TIME Magazine, thanks Dr. King for his editorial contributions to the magazine in the past year.

Science (Its Limitations)

Dr. King notes that while man’s actions as an animal are biological (science), his actions as a person are spiritual and require a spiritual cause, suggesting there is a Creator God.

Memorandum to Files

Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy and expresses that "the death penalty is applied to anyone who steals from his brother or carries him away in slavery."

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
GHANA

While in Ghana, Mr. John Lewis congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Lewis states, "the Nobel Peace Prize Committee had no choice but to select you for such an honor."