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Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965
Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD)

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Man

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes about man, as discussed in the Old Testament passages, Hosea 10: 13 and 14.

Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Funeral Service for Mrs. Sharon Joann Moss

Saturday, October 10, 1964
Ohio (OH), Detroit, MI, Cincinnati, OH

Sharon Joann Moss, wife of Otis Moss Jr., passes at an early age and is given a funeral service which includes numerous members from the civil rights movement. Dr. King delivered the eulogy for the service and many other prominent members operated as pall bearers.

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962
California (CA), Selma, AL

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967
JORDAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The American Ambassador in Anman, Jordan encourages Dr. King to not reconsider his upcoming pilgrimage to the Middle East. Despite the turbulent political situation in the region, cancellation of the well-publicized trip would generate "distinct disadvantages" and much disappointment.

Letter from Roger Bobley to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
New York (NY)

Roger Bobley, Revision Editor for the Illustrated World Encyclopedia, writes Dr. King asking him to submit a report on the "goals, importance and achievements of the Civil Rights movement in America."

United States Department of Agriculture

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH, Boston, MA, Missouri (MO), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA), Florida (FL), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), New Mexico (NM), Maryland (MD)

This document references Secretary Orville L. Freeman's speech regarding administrative programs to improve food assistance and nutrition. One of the programs that is discussed is the School Breakfast Program, which will make free breakfast available to thousands of children. Other programs are also mentioned and described as the document proceeds.

News/Letter: Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

Here is a 1967 newsletter from the Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence, covering a number of topics including the Vietnam War, the March on Washington, fascism, and non-violent tactical plans.

Making the Best of a Bad Mess

In this sermon, Dr. King discusses the letter Paul sent to Titus while he was in Crete. According to the letter, Crete was a terrible place for Christians, and Titus may have been confused as to why he was left there. Paul wrote to him saying that he left him there to make the situation better for the other people there. That is how one makes the best out of a bad mess.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966
FINLAND, Stockholm, Sweden, London, England, FRANCE, UNITED KINGDOM, SWEDEN

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary for Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to students regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Palmberg suggests raising funds in an effort to further Dr. King's nonviolent endeavors in America. Palmberg wrote Dr. King invitations to speak on numerous occasions.

Bible

Dr. King quotes John Ruskin and Thomas Carlyle on the significance of the Bible.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mr. Wachtel, Dr. King's legal counsel, provides an update on pending matters regarding the American Foundation of Non-Violence.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Telegram from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL

Talk show host and columnist Irv Kupcinet invites Dr. King to make an appearance on his television panel. Mr. Kupcinet discloses knowledge of Dr. King's visit to Chicago for an announcement on July 24, 1965, and encourages the civil rights leader to appear on the show later that afternoon.

Pledge Card: Get Rid of Wallace

Alabama (AL)

This adverse advertisement published by the SCLC encourages Negro residents of Alabama not to vote for Governor George Wallace.

Draft Position Paper on Economic and Fiscal Policy

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The basis of this draft paper is about the proposed elimination of poverty in the United States within a ten-year span. A plan called the "Freedom Budget" has been endorsed by the A. Philip Randolph Institute. The premise of this paper is to "carry forward these developments in the economic and fiscal area, setting forth suggested policies which might be supported by all individuals and groups associated" with the goal of eradicating poverty in the United States.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Dallas, TX

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Letter from a Disgruntled Author

The author expresses his grievances towards Dr. King and his leadership of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Ada M. Field to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Ada M. Field is a ninety-year-old woman who sent Dr. King her contribution for the year. Ms. Field praised Dr. King, and the SCLC, for continuing to fight for freedom and for bringing a positive light to the process.

Letter from Bryan Fulks to MLK

Tuesday, March 20, 1962
Arizona (AZ), London, England

Bryan Fulks writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his diligent work during the fight for social justice and human dignity. Fulks also mentions how elated he was when the editor of the "London Humanist" chose to enrich his article including a pictorial illustration of Dr. King riding through the southern region of the United States.

Dr. King Does Know Where We're Going

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC)

In this letter to the editor, Rev. W. Alfred Wilkins responds to a recent editorial, which reviewed Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" Rev. Wilkins explains why he disagrees with the previous editorial, and he summarizes several chapters he considers relevant.

Immortality (Aquinas)

Dr. King references Saint Thomas Aquinas regarding the topic of immortality.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. Mays presents Dr. King with a $300 honorarium for giving the first convocation address at Morehouse College.

Toynbee: List of Twenty-One Societies

Dr. King notes the twenty-one civilizations described in Arnold Toynbee's "A Study of History."

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956
New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chester, PA, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Letter from P. Edward Haley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Washington, D.C.

P. Haley writes to express appreciation for Dr. King's works. Haley encloses copy of letter he and his wife sent to their Congressmen commending Dr. King's ideas concerning Vietnam and the riots. The Haleys are making an effort to start a nationwide campaign by encouraging their friends to write their congressman as well.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, January 28, 1963
Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet, columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, offers Dr. King recognition for his appearance his TV show. He thanks Dr. King for his significant contribution to the overall success of the program.

Telegram from Arrowsmith to MLK

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
AUSTRALIA, Atlanta, GA

Arrowsmith issues a telegram inquiring about Dr. King's potential visit to the country of Australia.

Telegram from Simon Anekwe to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1967
Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA, NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Simon Anekwe urges Dr. King to visit Nigeria and states that Dr. King's intervention would save thousands.