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MLK Handwritten Notecard on "Scientific Method"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines "Scientific Method."

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Letter from Archon Bowen to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968

Mr. Bowen, Chairman of the Nominating Committee for Sigma Pi Phi Kappa Boule, expresses concern to Dr. King regarding a decrease in membership due to a high mortality rate of members throughout the nation. Enclosed is a membership nomination form to be completed and returned to the Chairman.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

In a Word- Now

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

An Open Letter to Free Americans

In response to Dr. King's assassination, the author urges "Free Americans" to join the fight against racism.

Letter from SNCC Executive Committee to MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

John Lewis and Silas Norman of SNCC write Dr. King to address their organization's grievances with the SCLC, specifically the SCLC's lack of cooperation in the Selma Voting Rights campaign. Members of SNCC state their disagreement with the march planned for March 7, 1965 because "the objectives of the march do not justify the danger and the resources involved." Lewis and Norman request a meeting with Dr. King to discuss reconciliation between SNCC and the SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Monday, July 8, 1963

Dr. King sends Attorney General Robert Kennedy a copy of the telegram he sent to Vice President Lyndon Johnson. The city of St. Augustine, Florida refuses to desegregate its facilities, which Dr. King describes as a "denial of Negro citizenship."

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Letter from Elaine Haley to Senator George Murphy

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Elaine Haley sends a letter to Senator George Murphy discussing Dr. King's views on riots in relation to ending the Vietnam War.

Letter from Edmond Melis to MLK

Saturday, January 23, 1965

Edmond Melis asks Dr. King to write a forward for an international police association magazine. He also expresses an interest in helping end discrimination in the United States.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

Letter from Dorothy Dunbar Bromley to Andrew Young

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mrs. Bromley informs Reverend Andrew Young that she would like to write Dr. King's biography.

Memorandum from William A. Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette to SCLC Staff Members

Thursday, January 4, 1968

William Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette inform the SCLC staff members of an impromptu retreat on the Poor People's Campaign, which will be held at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Birthday Card From Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Arlen B. Makler and Alfred J. Lindh to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966

Mr.Makler and and Mr.Lindh provide details for the Delaware Citizens Housing Conference that Dr. King has contingently agreed to participate in. The overall purpose of the conference is to explore race relations as it pertains to "equal opportunity in housing".

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK and Andrew Young

Friday, July 7, 1967

As a result of an automobile accident, Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King and Andrew Young of possible litigation against SCLC.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Letter from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Wednesday, September 27, 1967

Dr. King is visiting Newcastle, England to receive an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Bettenson of Dr. King's schedule and requirements so that the staff can prepare accordingly.

Holy Week Service

Wednesday, April 18, 1962

This Holy Week Service program for Augustana Lutheran Church highlights Dr. King as a guest preacher where he delivers a sermon entitled "Remember Who You Are." The program goes on to detail Good Friday and Easter Sunday Services, as well as informing readers of Dr. King's television interview.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Congressman Gallagher of New Jersey writes Dr. King to confirm reception of his telegram in which he urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Mississippi Congress was seated despite Congressman Gallagher's vote against the action.

Letter from Maurice B. Fagan to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mr. Fagan, Executive Director of the Fellowship Commission, requests Dr. King?s suggestion for nominees for the 1967 National Fellowship Award. As a former award recipient, Dr. King's opinion and advice is highly valued.

Letter from Juanita Turner to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966

35 year-old Juanita Turner writes Dr. and Mrs. King seeking help in her time of crisis. She has lived in Chicago for 12 years and suffers from epilepsy. She needs help finding a trustworthy attorney, a dependable doctor, and basic necessities.

Letter from Frank J. Pastor to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from Frank Pastor was written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.