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Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Babcock for her substantial contribution and lets her know that her continued generosity and abiding faith in the cause have served to sustain and renew the strength of the SCLC.

Letter from Cees van Gils to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is congratulated for his receipt of an honorary degree from a university in Amsterdam. Cees van Gils requests Dr. King deliver a speech to the Tilburg University community during his tenure in Europe.

Invoice-"Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 16, 1967
New York (NY)

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King, for the shipment of six copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Reverend R.V. Brown to MLK about Moral Support

In this letter Reverend R.V. Brown offers his moral support to Dr.King.

Letter from John Hay Whitney to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

In this letter, Mr. Whitney, Chairman for the Family of Man Award Dinner honoring General Dwight D. Eisenhower, invites Dr. King to join him and other guests on the dais.

Letter from Nathan Green to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Here, Nathan Green requests to meet with Rev. Abernathy to discuss a plan that Green believes will be of "tremendous value" to their cause.

Letter from Dolly Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963
New York, NY

Dolly Davis, Publicity Director of the John Day Company publishers, writes Dr. King to request his reaction to Harold Isaac's book, "The New World of Negro Americans." Davis asks permission to quote his comments and sends him the advance galleys.


Dr. King references Thomas Carlyle regarding the topic of immortality.


Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

Letter from MLK to Richard Huett

Monday, February 25, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King informs Richard Huett, Editor of Laurel Editions and Delta Books, that he cannot write a book for Huett due to other writing responsibilities and time commitments.

Breadbasket and National Tea Agree

Monday, December 12, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Operation Breadbasket teams up with the National Tea Company to improve employment and business opportunities for Negroes.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Monday, October 21, 1963
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Letter from M. Carl Holman Regarding Equal Education Opportunity Conference

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Washington, D.C.

M. Carl Holman, the Director of the Equal Educational Opportunity in America's Cities, a conference of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, writes to the conference partic-ipants, Dr. King included. Carl Holman writes that this conference was specifically requested by President Johnson following the Commission's report on racial isolation in public schools.

Letter from W. Daniels to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

W. Daniels corresponds to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak in Montreal at the Grand Master's Banquet on August 13, 1968.

Letter from Walter P. Reuther to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter P. Reuther extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as a member of the Executive Committee for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Letter from Irwin Heilner to Attorney Clarence Jones

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), New York, NY

Irwin Heilner asks Dr. King's attorney for permission to use the "I Have a Dream" speech in one of his songs. He mentions that he previously used words from Langston Hughes in a song on a 50 percent basis and would like the same agreement for the use of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, October 29, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. Mays writes to Dr. King regarding the new statement of purpose for Morehouse College.

We Shall Overcome Sketch

Charlie Cheese Carson's created this sketch which illustrates many notable civil rights leaders as chess pieces.

Letter from C. I. C. Bosanquet to MLK

Wednesday, November 22, 1967

Vice Chancellor Bosanquet of the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne provides Dr. King with the photographs from the honorary degree service. In addition, he expresses gratitude for Dr. King's visit in the mist of his "strenuous" and "eventful" life.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Show Business Salute to Danny Stradella

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Joey Adams invites Dr. King to attend the AGVA Youth Fund dinner featuring Danny Stradella.


Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brightman's views on Science and Religion.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966
Nevada (NV), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.