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Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Letter to Miss Tower Regarding Dr. King's Book

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

In this brief note, Thomas Merton expresses gratitude to Ms. Tower for gifting him with Dr. King's new book. Merton, a contemplative monk, provides a statement possibly to appear as an endorsement of sorts and requests copies of the edition when it is made available.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Letter from E. P. and M. C. King to President Johnson

Saturday, July 29, 1967

The Kings write President Johnson to discuss their dissatisfaction that neither Dr. King nor Charles Evers was appointed a member of the Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Letter from Joseph Looney to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Joseph Looney writes Dr. King inviting him to visit American College in Louvain, Belgium. Looney suggests the Reverend lead a discussion regarding the developments in the Civil Rights struggle and his role in it. Looney closes by praying that God will bless Dr. King and his family.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.

The Negotiating Committee and Housing

Thursday, May 12, 1966

This statement by the Negotiation Committee lists several improvements made to an African American housing community. The Committee explains that the changes are only on a trial basis and therefore, the community will still picket until permanent changes are made.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Letter from Irma Monsky to Mary McHugh

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

In this letter, Irma Monsky informs Mary McHugh that their panel of judges selected "Christians and Jews: The Tragic Past and the Hopeful Future" and Dr. King's "Where Do We Go from Here", as winners for their National Mass Media Brotherhood Award Program.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

Letter from Reverend R.V. Brown to MLK about Moral Support

In this letter Reverend R.V. Brown offers his moral support to Dr.King.

Letter from Thomas Wilkins to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Thomas Wilkins suggests that Dr. King consider pursuing an initiative against taxation in Alabama. He proposes that any Negro who is refused voter registration should not pay any taxes in the state.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Letter from A Friend to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

In this letter, "a friend" to Dr. King offers suggestions to help the black race become more valuable to society.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Freedom!: A Spiritual Inspiration

Composer Kenneth A. Roane wrote the song "Freedom," which he dedicated to the fight for civil rights.

Letter from June A. Williams

June A. Williams encloses a copy of the November - December, 1966 American Veterans Committee Bulletin which carries a summary report of the recent AVC National Conference of the Draft.

Bond and The Constitution

The author of this article argues that the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Horace Julian Bond represents a great injustice. The author asserts that Mr. Bond was refused a seat due to his views on American foreign policy and the issue of race.

Telegram from Roland Wolf

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this Western Union telegram, Roland Wolf requests Dr. King's appearance on a "conversation show" with one or two writers, allowing an opportunity to learn his views on existing issues.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Letter from Gunter Kohlhaw to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. Gunter B. Kohlhaw shares the memorable experience of hearing Dr. King deliver a sermon while attending Sunday service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Kohlhaw also requests copies of Dr. King's collection of sermons.

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

The Gary Crusader: The World of Books

Saturday, June 24, 1967

This review of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" highlights his examination of the Black Power movement as well as his emphasis on non-violence.

Letter from Agnes Rudell to MLK

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Ms. Rudell suggests that Dr. King should relocate to another country due to his dissatisfaction with the United States of America.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967

T. K. Mahadevan writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to an article paying homage to the late Reverend A. J. Muste.