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Views of Senator Barry Goldwater

San Francisco, CA, New York (NY), California (CA)

This document depicts brief summaries of Senator Goldwater's sentiments regarding civil rights, social welfare, education, right-wing extremism, disarmament and peace.

Letter from L. Martinez to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mrs. L. Martinez describes to Dr. King what she has observed about the Lawndale area in Chicago, Illinois. She suggests that instead of relocating to other neighborhoods, the tenants of Lawndale initiate a clean up of the area themselves.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Virginia (VA)

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
SWITZERLAND

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960
Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Orangeburg, SC, Birmingham, AL, Nashville, TN, Tallahassee, FL, Little Rock, AR

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Friday, November 1, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Donald G. Brownlow from Department of History invites Dr. King to speak with students on the current issues of today, especially race relations in the United States. Dr. King's handwritten note in the margin indicates, "Can't go this academic year...Southern struggle."

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Sargent Shriver, Director for the Office of Economic Opportunity, regretfully informs Dr. King that he will not be able to meet with SCLC's delegates in Birmingham for their convention.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964
Chicago, IL

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

The Relation of Morality and Science to Religion

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's view on the relation of morality and science to religion.

And There Was Love

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

New York City's Salute to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York (NY)

Upon return to the US after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King was awarded the City of New York Medallion of Honor by Mayor Robert Wagner. This document is a program from the event, "Salute to Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." It lists the featured speakers and entertainment.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Jacob Broertjes

Wednesday, September 2, 1964
NETHERLANDS

Dorothy Gaines encloses a copy of all of Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young's expenses while in Amsterdam for the Baptist Federation Convention.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Letter from Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Pastor Marshall L. Shepard invites Dr. King to the Dedication Service for the Mount Olivet Village Corporation in Philadelphia.

Letter from John. O Behrens to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mr. Behrens welcomes Dr. King to the city of Chicago. In an effort to show his gratitude, Behrens offers Dr. King a subcription to "Community", a magazine published by Friendship House. He also requests an opportunity to interview with Dr. King.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

VIETNAM, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CHINA

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Connecticut (CT), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Letter from David Darrin to Jeannette Rankin

Sunday, January 21, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Here, in this document, David Darrin writes to the Honorable Jeannette Rankin, National Women's Party, regarding the organization of The National Council for Promoting World Peace.

Letter from Florida Congressman Dante B. Fascell to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

Representative Fascell informs Dr. King that he will vote against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965, but he will vote for the bill itself.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Letter from Mrs. Clara Bayles to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Iowa (IA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Missouri (MO), Des Moines, IA

Mrs. Bayles of Des Moines, Iowa writes Dr. King during his sentence in the Birmingham jail. She congratulates him for all of his achievements and reminisces on the events she has been privileged to attend and hear him speak publicly.

Telegram from Marion Barry and Edward Biking to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960
Atlanta, GA

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee extends gratitude to Dr. King for his deep commitment to the concept of nonviolence and a free society while he is incarcerated in the Dekalb County Jail.

Letter from Bernice Lind to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1961
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the First Methodist Church in Santa Monica, California, Bernice Lind requests a copy of a speech Dr. King gave at the local Civic Auditorium.

Otline: The Philosophy of Nonviolence

This document outlines Dr. King's speech, "The Philosophy of Nonviolence." He notes both the means and ends of nonviolence and explains that the "highest expression" of non-injury is love. He describes nonviolence as an activism technique and outlines the goals of the philosophy.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and future Congressmen, writes to Dr. King to share his concerns regarding the need for an improved relationship between SNCC and SCLC.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson To Mrs. Arthur Stengel

Monday, June 29, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Lady Bird Johnson writes Mrs. Arthur Stengel expressing amazement at her likeness of the President. Sally Stengel was a sculptress whose likeness of Eleanor Roosevelt is permanently placed at the White House. Joseph Mermel contracted Dr. King to inquire whether he wished a similar bust of himself.

Philosophy of History

Dr. King writes about the philosophy of history according to Isaiah 41: 1-7.