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Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Royalty Statement for Strength to Love

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Joan Daves issues this royalty statement for a German language edition of Dr. King's Strength to Love. The statement includes the amount earned and number of copies sold.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Telegram from Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965

Mr. Spock invites Dr. King to send a representative to a discussion on the upcoming Washington Vietnam Mobilization.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Letter from Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild

Monday, January 9, 1967

This letter is an invitation from Rabbi Rothschild to the Eighteenth Annual Institute for the Christian Clergy. Throughout the letter the Rabbi outlines the activities of the day and expresses his appreciation for all who will attend.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966

Dr. Mays presents Dr. King with a $300 honorarium for giving the first convocation address at Morehouse College.

Symbols

Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Dort, Canons of

Dr. King documents a brief history of the Arminian judicial decision, officially titled "The Decision of the Synod of Dort."

Press Release for Catholic Interracial Council Award

Tuesday, August 11, 1964

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago announces that Dr. King will be awarded the John F. Kennedy Annual Award at their 1964 benefit dinner as a tribute to his leadership. According to polls published in Newsweek magazine, Dr. King's leadership was prized "more than any other single Negro."

Man

Dr. King references two quotations on a note card titled "Man."

Project Concern Pamphlet

This Pamphlet, made by Project Concern, discusses the efforts taken to help the impoverished and sick.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Letter from Paul Rosing to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Dr. King is notified by Paul Rosing of the Borromeo Seminary College that he has been placed on the mock ballot for their "Choice 68" campaign. He asks that Dr. King submit any type of potential campaign literature, speeches and etc.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Draft Law

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Dr. King receives an anonymous letter regarding the revision of Draft Law. The author states that the July 1, 1967 revision of the law allows regulations that further burden the military service to lower income groups, specifically Negroes, instead of requiring that Military service be spread more equally. The author encloses the State Memorandum No. 6-21, which was issued by the Illinois State Director of Selective Service on July 19, 1967.

Religion

Dr. King records a definition of religion from Wieman and Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Evil

Dr. King quotes the definition of evil and conceptualizes it as a "frustration."

Sermon Notes of Dr. King

The document, seen here, contains sermon notes written by Dr. King. The tittle of this sermon is listed as "The Jungles of Life", with the scripture passage coming from Jeremiah 12:5.

Letter from Alice Houghton Sherill to MLK

On behalf of the Detroit Women for Dr. Martin Luther King, Alice Houghton Sherrill thanks Dr. King for the envelopes received from his secretary. Mrs. Sherrill extends her welcome to Dr. King for his upcoming visit to Detroit and offers the group's assistance during his stay.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Monday, March 2, 1964

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to C. I. C. Bosanquet

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Dora McDonald informs C. I. C. Bosanquet, the Vice Chancellor at the University of Newcastle, of Dr. King's upcoming arrival to the university and regrets his inability to stay longer.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable John Sherman Cooper

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Kentucky Senator John Sherman Cooper to commend his role in facilitating the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Proclaim Liberty...

Carl T. Rowan, one of the most prominent black journalists of the 20th century, is honored at the Progressive Club in Atlanta, GA. This reservation form was sent out to invited guests of the celebration.

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dimitri Papaspyrou, President of the Parliament, invites Dr. King to Greece to create a better understanding between Greek and American people.