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Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966
New York, NY

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Letter from MLK to Leslie Cohen

Friday, August 9, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King offers his appreciation to Leslie Cohen for communicating to him an "honor bestowed... ...by each of Miss Egnal's eighth grade class."

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Letter from Robert H. Goldsmith to MLK

Saturday, April 15, 1967
North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM, Virginia (VA)

Robert Goldsmith sends a contribution and expresses his support of Dr. King's Christian methods to attain full integration and civil rights. He discusses Dr. King's campaign to end the Vietnam War and asserts that the country is engaged in an immoral action in Southeast Asia.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLk

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

In this document, Dr. King's literary agent, Joan Daves, forwards a royalty statement, for the French editions of Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Letter from Carson Lyman to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Carson Lyman, managing editor of U.S. News and World Report, encloses the transcript of an interview with Dr. King. Lyman asks Dr. King make any necessary changes to the transcript, but to make sure "to preserve the informality of the language."

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
Chicago, IL

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss inform Dr. King that his recent broadcast on Face the Nation has reinvigorated their faith in the movement.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
Memphis, TN

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Payments from England

Wednesday, December 2, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Literary agent Joan Daves provides Dr. King with detailed figures of royalties from an anthology containing his work and the British edition of "Stride Toward Freedom."

John of Damascus

SYRIA

This notecard contains historical information regarding John of Damascus and outlines some principles of his religious philosophy.

Letter from Samuel S. Backlar to MLK

Friday, October 3, 1958
New York (NY)

Samuel S. Backlar, Chairman of the American Legion New York County Organization, writes Dr. King wishing him a "speedy recovery" and invites him to speak at Abraham Lincoln's 150th birthday celebration.

Photograph of MLK Receiving Honorary Degree

Monday, June 1, 1959
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This photograph shows Dr. King receiving an honorary degree from Boston University.

Letter from Keith Black to MLK

Sunday, May 8, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

Keith Black, on behalf of the Valley Community Presbyterian Church, sends Dr. King a check for the SCLC.

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Moral Absolutism"

Dr. King drafted this handwritten outline entitled "Moral Absolutism." The focus is on judgement and its relation to both good and evil.

Letter from Joan Finney to MLK

Tuesday, September 10, 1963
San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Atlanta, GA

California Democratic Council Secretary Joan Finney encloses the remainder of a financial contribution to Dr. King and the SCLC. Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker was the keynote speaker for an event held by the council and was presented the first part of this donation.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Kansas (KS), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), VIETNAM

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from Jeffery Goldberg to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967
New York (NY), San Francisco, CA

In this letter, Jeffery Goldberg comments on the Vietnam War and requests a copy of Dr. King's speech to Church Laymen.

The Martin Luther King Column (2)

New York (NY), Little Rock, AR

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Sarnoff

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King commends Robert Sarnoff and NBC for sponsoring Harry Belafonte's guest role on the "Tonight Show."

Science and Religion

Dr. King documents a quote regarding science and religion from "The Finding of God."

Letter from Reverend Roland de Corneille to Wyatt Walker

Friday, December 6, 1963
CANADA

Reverend Roland de Corneille writes to Wyatt T. Walker regarding a fundraiser for the SCLC. Reverend de Corneille would like for Dr. King and a notable celebrity, such as Harry Belafonte or Nat King Cole, to come to Toronto, Canada for a benefit show.

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR)

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.

Letter to MLK from John Yeatman

Saturday, May 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Pennsylvania (PA)

John Yeatman sends his gratitude for all of Dr. King's efforts in teaching peace and wishes him well in every endeavor.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.