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Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Telegram from Icabod Flewellen to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Icabod Flewellen welcomes Dr. King to Cleveland, Ohio.

Telegram from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

The registrar at Newcastle University thanks Dora McDonald for communicating Dr. King's additional engagement commitments to help in their planning.

Ritschl

Dr. King records a quote of Albrecht Ritschl regarding Christology.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Thursday, February 9, 1961

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. announces their recent involvement with President John F. Kennedy.

Work Summary of Rachel Davis DuBoise

This document is a brief work summary for Rachel Davis DuBoise as a member of the Dialogue Department of SCLC covering the periods from November 1965 to October 1966.

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

Letter from Helen Harris to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Helen Harris, Chairman of the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto's Social Action Committee, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Why We Can't Wait Book Review

Monday, June 22, 1964

This article highlights Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from John S. Horner to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 7, 1963

John Horner of Grossman Publishers, Inc. writes Dora McDonald regarding the use of an article by Dr. King in a book they are publishing entitled "Instead of Violence." Horner encloses a pamphlet that includes information about the book, their catalogue and their terms of business.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

Fichte on God

Dr. King references Kantian protege Johann Gottlieb Fichte and philosophically defines God as the "moral order of the universe."

MLK to Preach at University of the West Indies

Friday, May 28, 1965

The Daily Gleaner in Jamaica reported that Dr. King was scheduled to preach the valedictory sermon at the Chapel of the University of the West Indies.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

While in Ghana, Mr. John Lewis congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Lewis states, "the Nobel Peace Prize Committee had no choice but to select you for such an honor."

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Dinkar Sakrikar writes Dr. King in reference to a proposed statue of Gandhi for a children's park. The statue seeks to reflect friendly relations between India and the United States. They ask Dr. King for his consideration along with a swift response.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

God

Dr. King records a portion of Carl Jung's argument that God is a function of the unconscious.

Meeting on National Negro Politics

Sunday, March 31, 1968

The Meeting on National Negro Politics highlights congressional races with "the most potential for political gains by black Americans" in the 1968 elections.

Eisenhower (His Nationalism)

Dr. King writes a few notes on President Eisenhower's speech made at Lafayette College in 1946. President Eisenhower states that because the United States is the greatest force in the world, it should extend its influence to protect itself.

Letter from Grace M. Meade to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, April 18, 1968

This message from Grace Meade to Ralph Abernathy relates the details of a Seattle, Washington funeral service conducted for Dr. King.

Letter from Tommy Wilkins to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 28, 1962

Tommy Wilkins writes Dora McDonald to inquire about a book loaned to Dr. King during his attendance at Emory University. Wilkins then requests its return and extends his best wishes to the SCLC for their work in Albany.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

Letter from Ben Carper to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Ben Carper expresses his opinion in regards to Dr. King's position on Communism. Mr. Carper states that Dr. King is, "playing hand in glove with Godless Communists."