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Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the meaning of a miracle.

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Fumbling on the New Frontier

Saturday, March 3, 1962

This article critiques the Kennedy Administration's civil rights agenda. Additionally, it outlines Dr. King's view that all presidents should play a pivotal role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Tullberg to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

The Tullberg family from New Hampshire conveys their support to Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. They believe that the war is a violation of the basic principles of human rights.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Telegram from Jack Paley to MLK

Jack Paley informs Dr. King that he has the support of the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union as Dr. King works "to win decent treatment for Negroes in public facilities of Atlanta."

Dr. King's Speech in Front of U.N. April 15, 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Birthday Card to MLK

Thursday, January 15, 1959

Elaine Stears and Family wish Dr. King a Happy Birthday.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Monday, October 17, 1966

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Fiers an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Dallas, Texas for the International Convention.

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

Friday, February 19, 1965

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Jespersen Og Pios Forlag has made an offer for the Danish language rights to "Strength To Love." Enclosed are agreements signed by Jespersen Og Pios Forlag.

Telegram from George W. Collins to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

Alderman George Collins welcomes Dr. King to Chicago and also issues an invitation for Dr. King to visit his office at any time.

Letter from SANE's Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Dr. Benjamin Spock requests the support of the SCLC for "A Rally for Peace in Vietnam." Dr. Spock informs Dr. King, that the rally will advocate for immediate actions concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Areatha G. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Areatha G. Bailey, President of the Highland Park Branch of the NAACP, invites Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Fund Dinner.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Letter from Rev. George Bett to MLK's Secretary

Monday, January 22, 1968

Rev. George Bett of St. John's Cathedral Church in Rhodesia, writes Dr. King's secretary to request a copy of King's recent address called "Address to the Churches" on a record.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK and Others

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Mr. Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other members of the ANLCA's call committee of vaccinations required when traveling internationally.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Monday, February 25, 1963

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. discusses the allegations and trials of Thomas Carlton Wansley.

A Union Treasurer Writes MLK Regarding the SCLC Convention

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Cleveland Robinson, Secretary Treasurer of AFL-CIO District 65 Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, writes to Dr. King with several suggestions for the upcoming SCLC convention.

SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

Tom O. writes Mrs. King attaching an example of a brochure which entails a description SCLC's affiliate program. Tom O. also insures Mrs. King that the color in which the brochure is printed is not final.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Blandena Lee Kossodo

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Blandena Lee Kossodo expressing that Dr. King is honored to have been offered to write the introduction to her book. However, Dr. King has to decline because he is writing his own book and for other publications.