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Christ

Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

Letter from Flournoy Coles to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Flournoy Coles invites Dr. King to come to Fisk University and lead a session of the Honors Program.

Letter from Irene Zimmerman to MLK

Sunday, January 29, 1967

Miss Zimmerman expresses disapproval in Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Relationship of State Units to the National Office

This document outlines the relationship between the national office of the SCLC and state level institutions, referred to as "State Units."

Letter from MLK to Randolph Compton - February 22, 1968

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Dr. King thanks Randolph Compton for his one thousand dollar donation to the SCLC. He also acknowledges that this contribution assists in the work of voter registration and securing decent jobs and decent housing for the poor.

Letter from Jesse Thomas to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Jessie Thomas is writing to Dr. King to promote the development of a new urban community in the Rockdale area of Atlanta. Mr. Thomas states that the development would be revolutionary and a model for other cities if it were to be approved by the housing authorities. He urges Dr. King to support the project and help in the planning of producing this new area.

Letter from a Soldier to MLK

In one of a series of letters to Dr. King, "Private Friend" seeks further advice from Dr. King on how to combat the discrimination he faces in the Army. Friend's response to Dr. King from an earlier correspondence provides detailed information regarding the sentencing structure of the unfair charges against him.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Friday, August 20, 1965

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Letter from W. A. Visser't Hooft to MLK

Wednesday, October 27, 1965

W. A. Visser't Hooft invites Dr. King to participate in the World Conference on Church and Society in Geneva, Switzerland. He provides a list of details about the conference, including the time already spent planning it and who will attend, to assist Dr. King in making his decision.

Protagoras

Dr. King writes about Protagoras’ view that appearance is reality.

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

Invitation from Douglas Davis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Douglas A. C. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at the University of Western Ontario's School of Business Administration. He explains that Dr. King's visit will be one of great pleasure and honor.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Nina C. Brown

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dora McDonald provides Nina C. Brown with details about Dr. King's upcoming appearance at Pennsylvania State University.

Letter from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Wednesday, September 27, 1967

Dr. King is visiting Newcastle, England to receive an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Bettenson of Dr. King's schedule and requirements so that the staff can prepare accordingly.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Holiday Letter from the Best Family

In this Christmas Card, the Best Family wishes all of their friends and supporters a Merry Christmas.

Letter from William Ryan to MLK

Monday, March 1, 1965

William Ryan, member of Congress writes Dr. King after he and other members of Congress were able to visit Selma. After witnessing the conditions at hand, they have been urged to break the barrier on the right to vote.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ozell Sutton

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Sutton's request for seventy-five copies of Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail." She regretfully informs the sender that their office is out of re-prints; however she suggests that he obtain copies of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in which the Letter from the Birmingham Jail is printed.

Letter from James R. Hoffa to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965

Teamsters President James (Jimmy) Hoffa requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the boycott in Alabama and how it relates to existing contractual agreements with interstate carriers.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Nature and Perception

Dr. King discusses his philosophical perspective on perception and nature.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King to ask him to consider donating his papers to the Atlanta University Center Library as an alternative to Boston University.

Letter from Donald Prince to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Donald Prince wrote this letter the day after Dr. King's assassination and addressed it to Mrs. King.

Christian Responsibility in a Nuclear Space Age

Saturday, February 27, 1960

The Church Federation of Los Angeles conducted the Christian Responsibility in a Nuclear Space Age Seminar, for which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Sunday, January 31, 1965

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).