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"Georgia (GA)"

Reuther in Praise of Poverty War Funds to Alabama Farmers Cooperative

Monday, May 15, 1967
Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL)

Walter Reuther, president of United Auto Workers, comments on the Office of Economic Opportunity's decision to give financial aid to the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association.

Letter from Student Supporter Richard Hathaway to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Richard Hathaway, a student at Haverford College, requests a copy of a speech Dr. King delivered at the United Nations Plaza. Hathaway was a participant in the march and rally at which Dr. King spoke, but was unable to hear the speech because of the crowd.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
Baltimore, MD, New York, NY, Maryland (MD), New York (NY)

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Contribution Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

A Department of State Agency for International Development summer intern expresses his support for SCLC. He offers a small contribution to the Atlanta-based foundation.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American history...as one of the great men of all time."

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Missouri (MO), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

Letter from Charley Brown to MLK about Wallace Administration

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

In this letter Charley Brown suggests to Dr. King the idea of endorsing Mrs. Wallace for governor of Alabama, arguing that this would actually lose Mr. Wallace a number of votes.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Letter from Peter Manniche to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1963
DENMARK

Peter Manniche, Chairman of the Scandinavian Executive Committee invites Dr. King to the Scandinavian nations to make public, radio, and television speaking appearances. Mr. Manniche is hopeful the Dr. King's presence in Eastern Europe will garner support for the civil rights cause in America.

March on Washington

Sunday, April 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Little Rock, AR, North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this news release, Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, addresses Congress to voice the people's concern in their quest for freedom, jobs and equal rights. He commends Republicans and Democrats in support of legislation to end discrimination.

Man

Dr. King quotes a line from Homer's epic poem "The Iliad."

Telegram from Walter T. Dixon to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Walter T. Dixon, a City Councilman from Baltimore, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

SCLC Form Letters

The first letter states that Dr. King is out of the city for a few days. The second letter expresses gratitude for the recipient's moral support and Christian generosity.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, GEORGIA, Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, California (CA), Missouri (MO), Washington, D.C.

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.

Letter From Octavia Wynbush Strong to MLK

Saturday, February 13, 1965
Missouri (MO)

Mrs. Strong offers Dr. King a copy of her play "Listen, America," with hopes that he might use it in his "wonderful work."

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

Immortality

Dr. King writes a quote from Goethe from Johann Peter Eckermann's "Conversations of Goethe."

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Letter from Rowland Koefod to MLK Regarding "Stride Towards Freedom"

Tuesday, February 21, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Mr. Koefod requests permission to reproduce a one page of manuscript from Dr. King's "Stride Towards Freedom," for a special issue of Boston University's alumni magazine.

Telegram from Ambassador Ade Martins to MLK

NIGERIA

This telegram was sent to Dr. King and Theodore Brown by N. Ade Martins, the Ambassador of Nigeria. He explains the reaction of Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, the commander in chief of the armed forces, to Dr. King's letter concerning the violence in Nigeria.

God

Dr. King quotes astronomer William M. Smart's concept of God in "The Origin of the Earth."

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Letter from Joseph Sittler to MLK

Friday, February 14, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Joseph Sittler requests feedback from Dr. King regarding the McCarran Act. The McCarran Act dealt with subversive activities and was passed in 1950. Sittler encloses a reply card for Dr. King's convenience.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Max Hess to MLK

Monday, May 14, 1962
California (CA)

Mr. Hess expresses his sincere admiration for Dr. King stating, "you have done more than stood fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free."

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Wachtel informs Dr. King that a large donation made by Mrs. Ann Farnsworth is now available. Wachtel then asks Dr. King who is to send the acknowledgment.

Program for SCLC Annual Freedom Banquet

Monday, August 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA)

This program from SCLC's Tenth Annual Freedom Banquet features Senator Edward M. Kennedy as guest speaker.

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.