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God (Knowledge of)

Dr. King references St. Thomas Aquinas' "Summa Contra Gentiles" in a quotation focusing on man's "threefold knowledge of divine things."

The Shaking Off of Burdens

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Professor Robert Birley delivers an annual memorial lecture on T.B. Davie at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He notes that Mr. Davie served as vice-chancellor for the college and is most noted for his adherence to the principles of academic freedom and his stand against apartheid. Birley believes that this annual memorial is absolutely necessary to maintain Davie's inspirational legacy and continue the fight for academic freedom . He brings up the politics of slaves versus the free, drawing on the philosophies of Aristotle, Plato, and others to describe examples.

Letter from Rev. Oliver W. Holmes to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 23, 1964

Reverend Oliver Holmes confirms the possibility of a meeting between Dr. King and Mrs. Leonard Faber, a graduate student in religion. Her dissertation involves Dr. King, German monk and theologian Martin Luther and Jewish philosopher Martin Buber.

Telegram from MLK to the Letters Department at Newsweek Magazine

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

Dr. King praises Newsweek magazine for making a persuasive appeal to the conscience and sanity of the nation on the racial crisis which engulfs America.

Letter from MLK to Rev. and Mrs. Gardiner Day

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. and Mrs. Day for their contribution to the SCLC. He expresses delight in knowing that the Days' donation will help to empower employment initiatives and voting rights programs in the United States. The letter was written in the weeks following the signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Dignity Is the Best Way

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter from Thomas K. Gilhool to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

The Fellowship House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania invites Dr. King to be a speaker at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney for her 35 years of service as Director.

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Monday, August 7, 1967

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Letter from L. H. Horace Perera to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

L. H. Horace Perera, Secretary General of the World Federation of United Nations Associations (WFUNA), invites Dr. King to be the speaker of honor at the 20th Plenary Assembly of WFUNA.

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.

Telegram from MLK to Robert L. Leggett

In this telegram, King urges the House of Representatives to please vote passage demonstration cities for the sake of civil peace.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from E. F. S. Davies to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

E. F. S. Davies, Head of the Department of Philosophy at Virginia State College, writes Dr. King regarding A. J. Muste's civil rights efforts in the 1930's and 1940's.

Letter form Gloria Kenny to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

Gloria Kenny praises Dr. King and the SCLC for sending a small group of individuals to the Agape Mass at MaryMount College. She also commends him on his efforts to speak out against the Vietnam War.

Photograph of MLK Receiving Honorary Degree

Monday, June 1, 1959

This photograph shows Dr. King receiving an honorary degree from Boston University.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Christianity (History Of)

Dr. King quotes Harkness on the history of Christianity. Likely this is American theologian Georgia Harkness.

Letter from E. M. to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

E.M. writes Dr. King to share his opinion concerning future demonstrations.

Letter from Arlen B. Makler and Alfred J. Lindh to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966

Mr.Makler and and Mr.Lindh provide details for the Delaware Citizens Housing Conference that Dr. King has contingently agreed to participate in. The overall purpose of the conference is to explore race relations as it pertains to "equal opportunity in housing".

Letter from Mrs. Emma L. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965

Emma L. Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church requesting permission to use his name and picture on their key ring project.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

Letter from Rev. A. S. Markham to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

Reverend Markham, Executive Head of the British Methodist Episcopal Church and Executive of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto, informs Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Sholom Synagogue would like to present an award to him. The award honors a person who has contributed to "the needs of humanity in a most outstanding manner."

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Eugene Sands

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Mrs. Eugene Sands to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Press Release from SCLC on New Biography of MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

This 1964 press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference focuses on a new biography of Dr. King "...written especially for children."

We Would See Jesus

Sunday, May 7, 1967

Dr. King gives this sermon to a congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He conveys a message of Christ's acceptance of all despite any person's wrong doings in the past. He also points out that Christ's work is exemplified through individual acts of kindness and helping others.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.