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A Statement by Dr. King

Sunday, July 17, 1966
Chicago, IL

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

Money

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Principles of Christian Ethics."

Letter From MLK to Mrs. William Lescase

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York, NY

Dr.King thanks Mrs. William Lescaze for her contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Wednesday, January 11, 1956
Washington, D.C., AUSTRIA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Selma, AL, New York, NY

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.

The Negro Family: A Challenge to National Action

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the topic of the Negro family. He emphasizes the importance of discussing the Negro family in comparison to other races.

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.

Beyond Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA, Alabama (AL)

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Telegram from SCLC to NAACP Convention

Tuesday, July 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference welcomes Roy Wilkins to Atlanta. They also express their hope that the laborers of the NAACP convenetion will help bring about equality.

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New Mexico (NM), Iowa (IA), INDIA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

God (Zephaniah)

ISRAEL

Dr. King discusses the Book of Zephaniah which includes the perception of God and the people of Israel.

Letter from Charles H. Percy to MLK

Chicago, IL

U.S. Senator Charles H. Percy expresses his appreciation for Dr. King, while also expressing his hope that the senate will soon pass a housing bill.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Letter from George Garabedian & Co. to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
Atlanta, GA, JORDAN, SYRIA, SWITZERLAND

George Garabedian writes Dr. King, pleased that he will be able to accommodate him and his group on their pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966
CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."

Letter to Miss Tower Regarding Dr. King's Book

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
Kentucky (KY)

In this brief note, Thomas Merton expresses gratitude to Ms. Tower for gifting him with Dr. King's new book. Merton, a contemplative monk, provides a statement possibly to appear as an endorsement of sorts and requests copies of the edition when it is made available.

Telegram from Bob Dillon to MLK

Sunday, September 15, 1963
Alabama (AL)

In this telegram, Bob Dillon requests Dr. King's presence along with Reverend Billy Graham at a revival being held in what he classifies as an "unchristian community" in Birmingham.

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

Monday, November 22, 1965
Tennessee (TN), SOUTH AFRICA, Los Angeles, CA, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Pittsburgh, PA, New York (NY)

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

Brunner

Dr. King cites theologian Emil Brunner regarding man's knowledge of God.

Operation Breadbasket Seminar

Chicago, IL

This brochure explains the economic development program "Operation Breadbasket." It consists of Negro and white clergymen of all faiths who are working to build a solid economic base among Negro people.

Letter from T. Jansma of the Dutch Baptist Union to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
NETHERLANDS, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

T. Jansma, General Secretary of the Dutch Baptist Union, asks Dr. King to deliver a speech to Baptists in Amsterdam while he is in the city to receive an honorary degree.

Letter from MLK to Dr. & Mrs. Bacon

Friday, October 17, 1958
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. and Mrs. Bacon for their kind donation of $200 sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
CANADA

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961
UNITED KINGDOM

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

Letter from Kerstin Lindblom to the SCLC

Thursday, September 8, 1966
SWEDEN

A Student from Sweden offers to come to America to work for the SCLC. Her letter describes all the ways she wishes to help.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

New York (NY), California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.