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Letter from Bradford Daniel to MLK

Friday, November 13, 1964
Texas (TX), BELGIUM

Bradford Daniel writes on behalf of John Howard Griffin, Associate Editor of Ramparts Magazine, and Father Dominique Pire, a Nobel Peace Prize recipient, to congratulate Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Daniel also requests help promoting the World Friendship Program of international correspondence.

Letter from Viola Burrell to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Burrell writes to Dr. King, expressing her concern for black people in the work environment.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
San Francisco, CA

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.

Letter from Werner Kelber to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY

German native and theological student Werner Kelber writes Dr. King expressing his discontent with the race relations in the Deep South. He compares the attitudes in the Deep South to those under Nazi Germany. Werner also explains that he would like to write his master's thesis on the movement and would value Dr. King's feedback.

Letter about Publication with Reprint of MLK's Remarks

Thursday, December 28, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Paul Kurtz, the editor of the Humanist, asks Dr. King to look over and comment on the enclosed copy of his piece that will be printed in Humanist.

Berkeley, George

Dr. King notes Berkeley's views on metaphysics.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

American Influence in Vietnam

New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. John C. Bennett, President of the Union Theological Seminary, expresses his political beliefs concerning the presence of American military in Vietnam.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

Indiana (IN)

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Christ

Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

Suffering (Psalms)

Dr. King references the biblical Book of Psalms regarding the topic of suffering.

Worship

Dr. King provides a definition of worship.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963
Massachusetts (MA)

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Albany, GA

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from Robert D. Heslep to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Georgia (GA)

The Philosophy of Education Society, Southeastern Region writes Dr. King giving full moral support in the development of "The Poor People's Washington Campaign."

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

SCEF Policy Statement

New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a policy statement on current civil rights and civil liberties issues presented by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. The organization is an educational agency with the purpose of eradicating discrimination among the nation's citizens. This document contains a list of advocacies and condemnations as it relates to federal legislature in favor of civil rights support.

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Chicago, IL

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

New York (NY), New York, NY

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Letter from Zelma Dodd to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, VIETNAM

Zelma Dodd sends Dr. King her best wishes along with two poems entitled, "The Soul of a Black Man," and "A Negro Soldier."

Letter from Jim E. Hansen to MLK Regarding Support for Presidency

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Utah (UT)

Jim Hansen, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68, a Time-Life sponsored national presidential primary at the College of Southern Utah, wrote to MLK in support of Dr. King as a presidential candidate. He requested materials for the April 1968 event which took place on the college's campus.

Citizenship Education Proposal

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Montgomery, AL

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

Letter from M. A. Cross to Marie Goldner

Tuesday, October 1, 1963
Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA)

M. A. Cross, Director of Public and Industrial Relations at Dan River Mills, Inc., informs Mrs. Goldner that Dan River Mills, Inc. does not discriminate against Negroes.

Slum Building Seized

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This article includes multiple viewpoints regarding Dr. King and the seizure of a slum building in Chicago.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 28, 1966
New York, NY

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

Saturday, November 24, 1962
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Kings writes an epitaph discussing Eleanor Roosevelt and what she stood for.