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I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, EGYPT, GREECE, Johannesburg, South Africa, KENYA, GHANA, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, CHINA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

MLK Memo on the Civil Rights Bill

Dr. King initialed this memo praising the passage of the civil rights bill. The memo points out that its passage is a "bright interlude" in the struggle for civil rights.

Telegram from Margaret Saunders to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960
Columbus, OH, Atlanta, GA

Margaret Saunders sends a telegram to encourage Dr. King while he is in jail.

Letter from Oral Roberts to MLK


In this letter, noted evangelist Oral Roberts thanks "my dear partner" for making possible a trip to Vietnam and encloses a special report on the mission. Roberts conducted more than 300 crusades on six continents during his ministry.

UAW 25th Anniversary Dinner Program

Thursday, April 27, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Indiana (IN)

The UAW's 25th Anniversary Dinner Program contains letters from notable activists commending the UAW, a statement from President Kennedy, a guest list, the evening's program, and a list of sponsors and donors. Guest speakers include: Dr. King, Senator Paul Douglas, Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg, and UAW President Walter Reuther.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart


"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Letter from Monica Wilson to Dora McDonald

Friday, March 11, 1966

Monica Wilson, from the School of African studies at the University of Cape Town, writes Dora McDonald expressing joy and excitement that Dr. King accepted the invitation to deliver the Davie Memorial Lecture. Wilson states that while King's accommodations are taken care of, the school cannot possibly pay for his aide.


Dr. King references author Emil Carl Wilm's publication, "The Problem of Religion."

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Monday, July 30, 1962
Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Little Rock, AR

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

Letter from Congressman John Conyers to MLK

Friday, October 8, 1965
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Congressman Conyers thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the Mississippi Challenge and gives him details regarding the vote in Congress.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament


Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Letter from MLK to Melvin Grussing Regarding a Contribution

Monday, February 26, 1968
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King writes to express gratitude for the generous contribution of $126 to the SCLC. He conveys that such support enables SCLC to continue programs to complete the task of voter registration in the South.

Letter from Robert S. Browne to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Robert S. Browne informs Dr. King that he disagrees with the editor the New York Times. Browne conveys his support to Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Poor People's Campaign 1968

Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Washington (WA), Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This is an ad and itinerary for the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. B. Wilson

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL), VIETNAM

Dr. King conveys gratitude to Rev. C. B. Wilson of Southern Baptist Church for a contribution to SCLC. King explains the increasing expenses of the Civil Rights Movement at a time when liberals are redirecting their attention to the peace issue.

Telegram from Lawrence F. O'Brien to MLK

Thursday, August 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Lawrence O'Brien, Special Assistant to President Johnson, invites Dr. King to the signing of the Voting Rights Act in Washington, D.C.

Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Levels of Love

Dr. King outlines several levels of love, such as Christian love, utilitarianism love and romantic love.

Prophecy (Micah)

Dr. King sketches notes on the prophet Micah, maintaining "...that the true prophet is one who draws his inspiration...from Jehovah his God."

Letter from Catherine Enge to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Catherine Enge, on behalf of the Bergens Kristenruss, asks Dr. King to write a newspaper article that will be distributed to approximately 12,000 Norwegians.

Dr. King's Response to Mrs. W. Bascom

Friday, October 17, 1958
Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Dr. King responded to the get well correspondence sent by Mrs. Willie Bascom. Dr. King took the opportunity to thank her for the kind donation sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He also acknowledged his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Article about Mattie Coney

Indiana (IN)

This article discusses Mattie Coney's accomplishments as the Founder of Citizens Forum.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

Post Card from Critic to MLK

This unstamped post card comes from a writer who identifies himself as "Ole Dorky" and targets Dr. King and the American Civil Liberties Union as "Communist skum." The writer disagrees with the work of civil rights and believes that efforts are "making matters worse for negroes."

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Georgia (GA)

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Speaking Out

New York, NY

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960
Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Memphis, TN, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.