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Telegram from MLK to Joan Baez

Friday, December 29, 1967

Dr. King sends encouraging words to Joan Baez, an American singer and civil rights activist, who is imprisoned at Santa Rita Rehabilitation Center.

Crozer Theological Seminary Telethon

Crozer Theological Seminary, Dr. Kings alma mater, issues a solicitation for contributions to its almnus. The letter states that alumni receiving the letter were not able to be reached during the "Crozer Alumni Telethon." Dr. King attended the religious institution from 1948-1951 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from Morehouse College.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gus Efroymson

Thursday, January 28, 1965

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Mr. Gus Efroymson for the contribution of $100.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Discipline

Dr. King records a quote from Proverbs 13:24 regarding discipline and corporal punishment.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Telegram from Margaret Saunders to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960

Margaret Saunders sends a telegram to encourage Dr. King while he is in jail.

Letter from J. Herbert May to Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Herbert May discusses several points in which he disagrees with Ralph Abernathy on how to best reach a fully integrated and equitable society.

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Joan Daves reminds Dr. King of her request for an available copy of his "doctors dissertation", for possible national and international publication.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

Telegram from Marvin Rich to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Marvin Rich informs Dr. King of a resolution that was adopted at a recent conference. The resolution called for a summit of civil rights leaders.

Letter from Hester DeLacy to MLK

Hester De Lacy contributes to the SCLC and expresses an urgent need for written copies of Dr. King's speeches. Mr. De Lacy informs Dr. King that he would prefer a copy of a speech delivered to a large and small audience in both the North and South of the country.

Letter from A. Dudley Ward to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

A. Dudley Ward, General Secretary for the General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, forwards an enclosed resolution to Dr. King.

Letter from Calvary Presbyterian Church to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Enclosed in this letter from Dr. John Bruere, of Calvary Baptist Church, is a magazine entitled "Faith at Work - The Magazine of Christian Experience." The featured article, "The Church That Stayed," highlights a church that has endured the deterioration, violence, and looting of the neighborhood surrounding it. The author goes on to discuss the increase in membership and their attempt to represent Christ in every situation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Celestine Fernando

Friday, May 5, 1967

Ms. McDonald grants Reverend Fernando permission to publish Dr. King's, "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

State of New York Civil Rights Bureau - 1967 Annual Report

This is the overview of the advancements and achievements affiliated with the New York Civil Rights Bureau, in 1967.

Letter from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Monday, November 23, 1964

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, encourages Dr. King to accept an invitation to address sessions of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention sent earlier by Dr. Paul L. Sturges.

Letter from Tadashi Akaishi to MLK

Monday, December 20, 1965

Tadashi Akaishi, Associate Book Editor for John Knox Press, writes Dr. King requesting to use his endorsement for Dr. Kyle Haselden's book "Mandate for White Christians" as the book's preface. The endorsement was initially to be included on the book's cover, but Akaishi feels that it is so well written that he now asks permission to use it as the preface.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Press Release: MLK Joins Sponsors of April 15 Marches on San Francisco and New York City

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this press release, Dr. King announces his support of a massive mobilization against the Vietnam War. Sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, major peace marches are being held in New York City and San Francisco. Mrs. King is also listed as a leader who endorsed the demonstrations.

Press Release from the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Sunday, January 15, 1967

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty releases a letter to President Johnson signed by numerous civil rights, labor, religious and community action groups calling for him to take leadership in the War on Poverty by increasing funding. The press release also announces a January 26 national meeting in Washington, D.C. to discuss the War on Poverty.

Letter from David J. Dennis to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

In this letter, David Dennis requests a letter of reference from Dr. King, prior to his draft board meeting, so to challenge an induction into the armed forces.

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy from Ralph E. Gulliver

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

The James H. Farrell Lodge contributes to the SCLC for the cause of Freedom-Now.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Keynote Address Introduction for Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

At the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers this introduction of guest speaker, Sidney Poitier. Andrew Young further praises Mr. Poitier for informing the black community that one should be "proud to be black" because "black is beautiful."

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

Letter from Walter Mondale to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

In this letter Congressman Mondale writes to Dr. King asking for feedback on the bill he's trying to pass, which is intended to provide government assistance for home ownership.

Letter To Mr. Kennady From Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter to Mr. Kennady, Miss Dora McDonald informs him that Dr. King is happy to grant permission to mimeograph copies of his article entitled " A New King Of Power".

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.