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"HAITI"

Resolution from the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference

Monday, April 8, 1968

This resolution, adopted by the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference, condemns the brutal assassination of Dr. King.

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Letter from Michell Blue to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

A sixth grader from Berkeley, California writes Dr. King to share his supportive view. In closing the young man remarks, "I don't have much to say but thank you."

Copernicus

Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought

These handwritten notes appear to be a draft of the essay "The Significant Contributions of Jeremiah to Religious Thought." Dr. King wrote this for James Bennett Pritchard's class on the Old Testament at Crozer Theological Seminary. Circa September 14, 1948 - November 24, 1948. The actual essay is in the King Archive at Boston University's Howard Gotlieb Archival Research Center.

Correspondence - Contribution Thank-You Letter from MLK to Chris Folcker 8/16/66

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

In this document Dr. King expresses great appreciation for the Swedish Consul General's donation of $100,000. The amount of this contribution would underscore that Sweden's commitment to Dr. King's work and the civil rights movement in general did not stop at the proverbial edge of the Nobel Peace Prize's water.

Letter From a Very Concerned Christian to MLK

The Christian author of this letter includes a poem to express concern and anguish regarding the War in Vietnam.

Request from Wm. James Stuart to MLK

Monday, June 14, 1965

Wm. James Stuart, a student, seeks the recommendation of books that helped Dr. King develop his own way of preaching.

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

Temple Sholom Bulletin

Saturday, September 19, 1964

This issue of the Temple Shalom Bulletin highlights Dr. King and his accomplishments during the Civil Rights Movement.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Housing Plan at Gadsden Is Upheld

Thursday, October 11, 1962

The U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals rules against Negroes in Gadsden, Alabama who wanted to stop urban redevelopment plan which would segregate the Negroes.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. Some of the topics discussed include the role of the SCLC, Operation Breadbasket and a voting bill.

Letter from Bernhard M. Auer to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Bernhard Auer, publisher for Time magazine, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude for Dr. King's role in helping attain accurate information throughout the year of 1961.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Pragmatism

Dr. King documents a J.B. Pratt quote from "What is Pragmatism."

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Suggested Approach and Chronology for St. Augustine

Wyatt Tee Walker writes Dr. King about the purpose, need and strategy for the St. Augustine demonstrations. In this letter there are details for proper attire and a schedule of demonstrations.

Letter from Pamela Buckler to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966

Ms. Buckler writes Dr. King requesting SCLC literature on Negro politics for her sociology paper.

Letter from Victor Seidel to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Victor M. Seidel requests a copy of Dr. King's lecture that was delivered at the University of Texas entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Religion

Dr. King records a quote on religion from William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Monday, September 25, 1967

Telegram from Duncan Wood on behalf of the Oslo Committee, hoping to arrange interviews in Moscow with Dr. King and Father Pire.

Judaism

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding the distinction between Reform, Orthodox and Conservative Judaism.

Statement on Nobel and Catholic Interracial Council Awards

Saturday, October 17, 1964

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, lauds Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and announces that the Council is awarding King its John F. Kennedy Award.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Tuesday, May 25, 1965

This letter to Dr.King from a supporter emphasizes the need for reform in the SCLC. Particularly with its writings. He tells Dr.King the need for editing grammatical errors on SCLC literature. He believes he has a workable plan to make changes that would better serve Dr.King and the movement.