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"HAITI"

Notecard Regarding Semi-Pelagianism

Dr. King writes notes regarding Semi-Pelagianism, which is "a movement in Christian theology which attempted to find a middle ground between the extreme doctrine of total depravity and predestination."

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Letter from Esther M. Jackson to McGeorge Bundy

Friday, May 19, 1967
North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), New York, NY

Esther Jackson, a professor at Shaw University, writes George Bundy of the Ford Foundation expressing his dismay in the support of a segregated theatre. Jackson also expresses his disappointment in Dr. King and Roy Wilkins for not recognizing the discrimination taking place in form of cultural separatism.

Letter from MLK to Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa

Monday, April 12, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, for his organization's $25,000 contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current works and beliefs of the SCLC and also stresses the importance of supporters like the Teamsters.

Memo from the East Garfield Park Organizing Staff to James Bevel, Bill Briggs, Bernard LaFayette, and Jim Poling

Friday, September 2, 1966

In this memorandum, the organizing staff of East Garfield Park outlines their plans of action to end slums. Their agenda is designed to operate the organization effectively.

Letter from James C. Gray, M.D. to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. James Gray of Washington, D.C. encloses three checks to Dr. King for the SCLC on behalf of his reading club. He encourages Dr. King to continue in his "great works."

Letter from Leslie Cohen to MLK

New York (NY)

Leslie Cohen informs Dr. King that Miss Egnal's eighth grade classes from Great Neck South Junior High School in New York have each elected him their "Man of the Year" over all other world leaders.

Congratulations to MLK from Michael Engel

Saturday, December 19, 1964
Michigan (MI)

In this letter dated December 19, 1964, Michael Engel sends his congratulations to Dr.King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize. He also asks for a picture of Dr.King for his scrapbook.

Why Should SCLC be Departmentalized?

This document defines and discusses the departmentalization of the SCLC. It also outlines the job duties of the following positions: Executive Director, Program Director, Director of Affiliates, Field Secretary, Field Worker, and Subsistence Worker.

Transcript of MLK Appearance on WINS Radio

Sunday, May 31, 1964
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

This document is a 1964 transcript of a WINS Radio interview with Dr. King. The focus is the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

Teleological Argument

Dr. King quotes Immanuel Kant’s view of the teleological argument from “Critique of Pure Reason.”

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

Howard University Charter Day Observance

Tuesday, March 2, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Chester, PA, Boston, MA, New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA), Tokyo, Japan, Chicago, IL, Geneva, Switzerland, London, England, HUNGARY, Los Angeles, CA, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Columbus, OH, Denver, CO

Howard University celebrates its' Charter Day Observance with a program that includes a speech by Dr. King. The program also acknowledges the recipients of the Alumni Achievement Award. Such individuals include Ossie Davis and Leroy F. Florant.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Promotional Article for Why We Can't Wait

Birmingham, AL

This Harper released publication contains a preview of the religious books to be published in the summer and fall of 1964. Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" is featured with the byline "The 'Man of the Year' writes the 'Book of the Year'."

Letter from Louis V. Sharples to MLK

Wednesday, March 31, 1965
Albany, GA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY)

Rev. Louis Sharples writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution on behalf of the Church of St. Alban the Martyn. Rev. Sharples expresses their awareness and concern for those negatively impacted by the march in Selma and hope their contribution can offer some assistance.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Washington, D.C.

During the year of 1967, Sargent Shriver served as Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity and created several community oriented programs. Shriver sends this telegram to Dr. King informing his support. Shriver appreciates King's ability to be forthright on the condemnation of lawless behavior and causes of social unrest. He agrees that "America must quickly develop and support adequate programs to remove these causes."

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Letter from Emily A. Fortson to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Ms. Fortson requests Dr. King contact her immediately regarding a press release to announce his upcoming pilgrimage. She informs Dr. King that both Jews and Arabs have shown "intense interest" in the trip.

Hegel

Dr. King outlines principles of Hegelian Philosophy regarding the ideal German State.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. Evelyn White

Wednesday, November 22, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that he received the materials sent to him. He also notes that he is unable to make a decision regarding his schedule and availability.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

Invitation to John F. Kennedy Funeral

Saturday, November 23, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This telegram sent from The White House in Washington, invites Dr. King to participate in the funeral services for President John F. Kennedy.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

The Meaning of Hope

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), GREECE, TURKEY, Mississippi (MS), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, CYPRUS, VIETNAM, NIGERIA

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."