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A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from Henry R. Luce to MLK

Thursday, January 30, 1964

Henry R. Luce expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's letter that will be placed in his personal archives as a "highly treasured memory."

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Letter from Artist Sidney Gordon Budnick to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Sidney Gordon Budnick, architect and artist, gifts Dr. King with a piece of art work and applauds Dr. King's "efforts to bring to life the brotherhood of God and of man."

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Philosophy of Life (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes G. K. Chesterton’s “Heretics.”

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Daniel B. Brewster writes Dr. King to thank him for urging his support for the elimination of the poll tax.

Letter from Matthew Schoenwald to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964

Matthew Schoenwald , manager of the Undergarment and Negligee Workers Union, encloses a check in the amount of $100 as a contribution to the SCLC.

Hegel

Dr. King documents a quote from philosopher Thomas Hegel regarding God and knowledge before commenting with his own thoughts.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1960

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

The Georgia State Senate

Friday, September 2, 1966

The Georgia State Senate informs fellow Democrats of an important meeting before the 1966 Primary Election. This meeting will focus on finalizing plans for their participation in this election.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Sarnoff

Dr. King commends Robert Sarnoff and NBC for sponsoring Harry Belafonte's guest role on the "Tonight Show."

Letter from MLK to Rev. A. D. Evans

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Dr. King writes Rev. A. D. Evans and friends of St. Paul A.M.E. Church to thank them for their financial contribution of $500 to the SCLC. He discusses the current efforts of the organization such as Operation Breadbasket and the citizenship schools. Dr. King explains their monthly budget and the importance of supporters.

Letter from the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. Milnor Alexander congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to for him to speak at the Legislative Seminar during the 50th anniversary celebration of WILPF.

Letter From MLK to Ada Hill

Thursday, July 25, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hill for her letter commending his letter from the Birmingham jail. He assures Mrs. Hill her encouraging words will help give him the courage to continue in the struggle to make brotherhood a reality.

Letter from Mr. Burke Marshall to MLK Regarding Political Opinion

Thursday, September 15, 1966

In this document, Mr. Mashall writes to Dr. King regarding issues surrounding the National Advisory Commission on Selective Service. He requests that Dr. King writes on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference on matters further outlined in Section 2.

Letter from Lucy Amerson to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Lucy Amerson corresponds with Dr. King in reference to a $150 donation made by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. to SCLC. The donation was a portion of the funds raised through the Ebony Fashion Fair project.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Ethel T. Elsea, Assistant Editor of Fleming H. Revell Company, writes Dr. King requesting to use his quotation in Frank S. Mead's unpublished book. Elsea also encloses a release form for the Reverend to sign and return.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee Democratic National Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a plea to the Democratic National Committee to provide a delegate from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party so that there may be equal representation within the state. Dr. King's feels that by providing a delegate it may discontinue the prevention of political participation of African Americans in Mississippi.

Let There Be Peace On Earth and Let It Begin With me

Monday, April 13, 1964

The program chairman for the Bucks County World Peace Fair invites Mr. and Mrs. King to speak on behalf of the Civil Rights movement. The event will be held on September 12, 1964.

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bill Daniels

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Bill Daniels, of WSB-TV, expressing outrage over a cartoon depicting overt racism in a court of law.

VFW Post 2156 to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966

The members of George Washington Carver Post VFW Post 2156 voice their support for Dr. King, along with a donation.

Religious Education

Dr. King discusses the topic of religious education. King asserts that religious education should not become a substitute for personal evangelism and that "religious instruction without conversion is comparatively ineffective."

Tillich's Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "The Protestant Era."

Epicureanism

Dr. King documents a passage from William De Witt Hyde's "Five Great Philosophers of Life" on Epicureanism. The passage outlines Epicurus' view on pleasure and the impersonal nature of the world.