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From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

University of Mississippi at Oxford Crisis

Dr. King discusses the Mississippi crisis after the admittance of James Meredith into the local University.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Friday, December 27, 1963

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Saturday, January 11, 1964

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

Letter from Clara Urquhart to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

Clara Urquhart invites Dr. King to speak at the Human Right Day Commemoration, sponsored by Amnesty International, on November 9, 1964.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne. The first name Gordon on the note card is incorrect.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from Jesse Thomas to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Jessie Thomas is writing to Dr. King to promote the development of a new urban community in the Rockdale area of Atlanta. Mr. Thomas states that the development would be revolutionary and a model for other cities if it were to be approved by the housing authorities. He urges Dr. King to support the project and help in the planning of producing this new area.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Advance

Monday, December 19, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses advance payment from Harper & Row for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Kenneth Barney to MLK

Monday, August 22, 1966

Dr. Kenneth R. Barney sends this letter of support to Dr. King. Barney expresses his appreciation for King's interpretation of "black power" and admires his wisdom on the country's current state of affairs. He urges Dr. King to keep a "broad perspective" on the problems of American society and civilization. Barney believes that domestic and foreign policies can no longer be considered separately.

Letter from Southern Junior High School to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967

R. E. Lyles, Principal of Southern Junior High School in Columbus, Georgia, requests that Dr. King provide biographical information and a photograph for the Muscogee County School District's Annual Social Science Fair.

Messianic Hope

Dr. King writes these notes on "Messianic Hope" from Isaiah 11:6 and 11:8. He quotes Ludwig Feuerbach, a German philosopher, from his work "The Essence of Religion."

What Do You Believe About Fair Housing?

This brochure was provided to the public to dispell the myths and solidify the facts of the fair housing market.

Christ

Dr. King quotes Albert Knudson's thoughts about how the disciples viewed Jesus Christ.

Telegram from Rev and Mrs A C L Arbouin to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Reverend and Mrs A.C.L Arbouin offer Dr. King spiritual encouragement during his time in Birmingham Jail.

Letter from MLK to Miss Kathy Granata

Wednesday, January 31, 1962

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Kathy Granata hoping that her words reflect the attitudes and thinking of the majority of today's young people. The Reverend continues by addressing Granata's young friend, stating that his exposure to her may aid him toward discovery.

Letter from Pennsylvania State University to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 22, 1965

Nina C. Brown writes Dora McDonald on behalf of Pennsylvania State University to thank her for arranging Dr. King's trip to the school.

Letter from John Thomas Porter to MLK

Thursday, June 28, 1962

Mr. Porter, pastor of First Baptist Institutional Church, writes to Dr. King concerning a previously discussed letter of recommendation. The letter will address a vacant pastoral position in Birmingham, Alabama.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Christmas Gift List of Mrs. King

This list entails those in receipt of a Christmas gift from Coretta Scott King.

Letter from Dale Rickmon to Rev. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

This letter of condolence is addressed to the Reverend Abernathy as the succeeding head of the SCLC. It accompanies a memorial poem written in dedication to Dr. King.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

The A. Philip Randolph Institute

The A. Philip Randolph Institute was organized to mobilize labor, religious and other groups in support of the civil rights movement. Dr. King was a member of the Advisory Board.