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Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.

SCLC Switchboard Schedule

This schedule lists the names, dates, and time of SCLC's switchboard operators.

Support from Lawyer Grenville Clark to Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech

Thursday, July 28, 1966

In this letter to U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech, Grenville Clark requests a reply to Dr. King's "devastating" public statement in the New York Times about proper enforcement of the 1965 voting rights law.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Bolt Culbertson

Tuesday, January 7, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Culbertson that Dr. King is grateful for the invitation to speak at a South Carolina fundraiser for the families of Medgar Evers and the children killed in the Birmingham church bombing, but will be unable to attend. Miss McDonald refers Culbertson to contact Roy Wilkins of the NAACP to be a possible keynote speaker.

Letter from David Puckett to MLK

Saturday, September 3, 1966

David Puckett writes Dr. King on behalf of the poor whites in the Uptown area of Chicago. Puckett asks Dr. King to support the upcoming rally and march, where they will demand the release of Sam Joseph O'Donnell and protest against the police.

Outline for The Secret of Adjustment

In this sermon, Dr. King notes applicable methods used to deal with the tensions in life. It is said that "the secret to adjustment is to find contentment." King further references the experience of the Apostle Paul and what he learned in confronting this problem.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Tuesday, March 31, 1964

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

Letter from Vernal G. Cave to MLK

Thursday, November 21, 1963

Vernal G. Cave informs Dr. King of a cousin's passing and contributes to the SCLC in his memory.

Letter from J. Herbert May to Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Herbert May discusses several points in which he disagrees with Ralph Abernathy on how to best reach a fully integrated and equitable society.

Letter from CB Gilless to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1962

Mr. Gilless writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed petition to establish a 'World Government'. He beckons "Just how much better than the American free public do you think the world government will be?" He requests an immediate rebuttal.

Loving Your Enemies

Dr. King's sermon "Love Your Enemies" is inspired by the life and message of Jesus Christ. According to the Bible, one must love not only those who love them, but also those who attempt to harm them. Dr. King is empathetic towards those who find it difficult to follow this practice, but regards it as necessary.

Nite of Civil Rights

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This program details events that occurred for a "Nite of Civil Rights."

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Monday, February 19, 1968

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Letter from Mrs. Fenner to MLK

Mrs. Fenner, on behalf of the Faculty of P. S. 155, sends a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for use in the fight for African American Civil Rights.

Letter from Ken Pardue to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Ken Pardue, the Election Commission Chairman of the Student Association at West Texas University, invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at Choice '68, a program conducted by Time magazine.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Diaz

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

City's Leaders Plan Dinner for MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

This article announces a banquet to be held to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize award. The banquet is hosted by various leaders in the City of Atlanta.

Letter from Mr. Peter Feldman to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

In this letter Peter Feldman, the production manager for WRVR Radio in New York City, requests an interview with Dr. King the day of his sermon at Riverside Church. WRVR feels the interview would be a "significant platform" for his upcoming march on Washington. Dr. King would be assassinated less than a month later.

Love

Dr. King quotes Ames' 1933 book entitled "Art" regarding the topic of love. "Love is the true life of man. God is love, and the kingdom of God is within us."

400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

Dr. King describes the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference involvement in the civil rights campaign, May-July of 1964, in St. Augustine, Florida. The excerpted article is taken from the SCLC Newsletter.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Letter from US Citizen to MLK

"A citizen who loves the country God let him own," writes to Dr. and Mrs. King criticizing them on their views on Vietnam and their ministerial work in regards to Christianity.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Letter from Rose Mary to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Seventh grader Rose Mary writes to Dr. King commending his efforts concerning "racial problems" and informing him of her admiration.