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"HONDURAS"

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

Letter from Lucius D. Clay to MLK

Sunday, June 16, 1963

Retired Army Officer Lucius D. Clay, responds to Dr. King, informing him that his telegram has be forwarded to T. C. Fogarty.

Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Letter Dated 10/15/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Monday, October 15, 1962

Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a letter to Mr. Mel Arnold acknowledging the enclosure of a sermon by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "How Should a Christian View Communism?"

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

Telegram from MLK to Rabbi Abraham Heschel

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. King writes Rabbi Heschel indicating that he will happily serve as a sponsor of the nationwide campaign to end bombings in Vietnam.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William R. Cummings

Monday, December 18, 1961

Dora McDonald writes William Cummings to inform him that Dr. King is in jail at the moment and the date of his return is difficult to determine. She explains that he will eventually be happy to learn of Mr. Cummings' invitation, but unfortunately his schedule will permit his attendance.

Philosophy Reading List

This document serves as the reading list of various philosophers. Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and more are apart of Dr. King's philosophical reading from October through January.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.

Letter from Tetsuo Kohmoto to MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965

Tetsuo Kohmoto, president of the Shinkyo Shuppansha Protestant Publishing Company, writes Dr. King regarding the Japanese edition of "Strength to Love." Kuhmoto requests a preface or message for the book and thanks Dr. King in advance for his kindness.

Adverse Letter from R. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

R. Johnson writes to Dr. King wishing physical violence against him. The author refers to Dr. King as "Big Mouth."

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

Letter from Ivery Simmons to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Ivery Simmons, President of Simmons Construction Company, informs Dr. King that his organization will assist with renovating the slum areas through out the nation, if financially supported by the government.

Letter from Taconic Foundation to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963

Stephen Currier, President of the Taconic Foundation, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting about the development of a new program. Currier lists other individuals who have been invited to serve as consultants and who will provide "an evaluation of Negro gains up to the present."

Telegram to W. L. James from Dr. and Ms. King

Monday, January 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King write Mrs. James expressing condolences following the death of her husband. Dr. James was a music educator at Spelman College and a 1923 graduate of Morehouse College . He served as Chairman of the Music Department at Spelman and Director of the Glee Club from 1933 to 1966. Dr. James died December 27, 1966.

Telegram from MLK to Chauncey Eskridge

Saturday, May 12, 1962

Serving as the Honorary President, Dr. King invites Chauncey Eskridge to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights luncheon held in Washington, D.C., where he will be able to provide legal services to many southern Negroes in need.

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Sunday, August 5, 1962

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Brunner & Niebuhr

Dr. King relates Swiss theologian Emil Brunner to American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, in that they both argue that reason is for adjusting to the material world, and faith is for dealing with God.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Telegram from Bob Dillon to MLK

Sunday, September 15, 1963

In this telegram, Bob Dillon requests Dr. King's presence along with Reverend Billy Graham at a revival being held in what he classifies as an "unchristian community" in Birmingham.

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Letter from Melvin W. Trent to Dr. King

An individual desiring to remain anonymous, writes Dr. King expressing his concern with employment discrimination and his belief that Dr. King can change things.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.