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Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967
Missouri (MO), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Milwaukee, WI, VIETNAM, Dallas, TX

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Letter from Frank Elliot to MLK

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

This letter is discussing the manuscript and galley proofs that will be sent to Dr. King before his trip to the West Indies. Frank Elliot suggest to Dr. King to search for the references in the galley proof, since no foot notes will be provided. He also request that Dr.King proof read "Antidotes of Fear" and provide a preface if he has spare time to do so.

Letter from Beatrice Schultz to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL

Beatrice Schultz responds to a letter from Dr. King and expresses her appreciation towards him for explaining his stance on "Black Power." She also encloses a contribution to further demonstrate her support of Dr. King.

MLK Address to District 65 of the AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 8, 1962
New York (NY), Florida (FL), Albany, GA, Little Rock, AR, Jackson, MS, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, GERMANY, FRANCE, JAPAN

Dr. King addresses District 65 of the AFL-CIO in Monticello, New York. He begins by expressing his appreciation to the AFL-CIO for their generous contributions to the Civil Rights Movement. He discusses the impact of the Albany Movement and segregation in the South. Dr. King makes the point that America refers to itself as a world leader, yet we are significantly behind other countries in social and welfare legislation.

The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

Civilian Review Board in New York City

Friday, July 31, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

The author asserts that the New York community should initiate a new program by the Unity Council to include the appointment of an independent Civilian Review Board. This tactic is thought to bring peace and tranquility to the community.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout invites Dr. King to eat lunch at the Chicago University faculty club.

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

Totalitarianism

New York (NY)

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Dr. J.M. Stansberry

Monday, July 20, 1964
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. Stansberry for his contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King states that without the aid from supporters, the initiatives of SCLC could not be carried out effectively.

Phillip O. Foss Seeks Permission to Use "Letter from Birmingham Jail"

Sunday, February 12, 1967
Colorado (CO)

Philip O. Foss writes to Dr. King in hopes of receiving permission to use excerpts from the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in his new text book.

Letter to Robert F. Kennedy from Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 4, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald writes Senator Kennedy to inform him that his recent letter to Dr. King came in his absence. She states that the letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return to the Atlanta office.

Letter from Charles V. Arthur to MLK

Tuesday, July 9, 1963
CANADA

Charles V. Arthur of Vancouver's Kitsilano Secondary School encloses a contribution for the SCLC. He explains that the staff wishes to show appreciation for the efforts of the SCLC.

Letter from the Baptist Union of Western Canada to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Baptist Union of Western Canada informs Dr. King that they have released him from any obligation to participate in the convention in Winnipeg. The union is conscious of Dr. King's great responsibilities and the difficulty he faces while attempting to make appearances.

Telegram from Charles William Butler to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965
Detroit, MI, Baltimore, MD

Charles William Butler, Pastor of New Cavalry Baptist Church, informs Dr. King that he will not be present at a board meeting. The lateness of the invitation and his involvement in Detroit, Michigan prevent his attendance.

King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed

Monday, March 25, 1963
Virginia (VA)

This press release entitled, "King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed," highlights Dr. King's challenge to moderate white southerners to become more vocal against racial injustices.

Letter from MLK to Sammy Davis Jr.

New York (NY), Chicago, IL

In this handwritten telegram draft, Dr. King informs Sammy Davis Jr. that his concerts in Chicago will not interfere with the movement. Dr. King goes on to suggest that one of Sammy Davis Jr.'s concerts be a benefit show for the Chicago Freedom Movement.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
San Francisco, CA, New York, NY

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador Adlai Stevenson

Monday, December 28, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Oslo, Norway

Dr. King thanks Adlai Stevenson, America's ambassador to the UN, for sponsoring a reception in his honor following his trip to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He commends Stevenson on his dedication to promote peace and reason in helping to solve world problems.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Telegram from Marvin Rich to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Marvin Rich informs Dr. King of a resolution that was adopted at a recent conference. The resolution called for a summit of civil rights leaders.

Letter from Edmund Stinnes to MLK

Wednesday, December 9, 1964
SWITZERLAND, New York (NY), INDIA, GERMANY

Edmund Stinnes reports a recent visit with his and Dr. King's mutual friends Asha Devi and Dr. E. W. Aryanayakam along with news about other acquaintances. He also shares his excitement about an upcoming meeting with Dr. King. He closes by inviting Dr. and Mrs. King to vacation at his farm in Brazil.

List of Negro Inventors

This list of Negro American inventors includes various individuals such as Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, who performed the first successful open heart surgery, and W.A. Lavalette, who invented the printing press.

Statement from MLK Regarding the Death of Malcolm X

Sunday, February 21, 1965

Dr. King comments on the assassination of civil rights activist Malcolm X.

Statement to the Press by MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

This document is Dr. King's statement to the press as a result of a Teachers March for voting rights, in Selma, Alabama.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes G. W. Knox on religion from the Harvard Theological Review.

Fifth Anniversary Observance

Sunday, February 14, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This is a draft of the program for the fifth anniversary observance for Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild.