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Ritschl

Dr. King records a quote of Albrecht Ritschl regarding Christology.

Letter of Invitation from Jay Goodlette-Bass to Mrs. Corretta Scott King to the Pageantry of the Peace Prize Award

Monday, October 19, 1964

The Fariyah Agency acknowledges Mrs. King commitment to the movement via her commitment to Dr. King. Additionally, the author requests Mrs. King presence to attend the pageantry of the Peace Prize award.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Letter from Glenn E. Smiley to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Smiley requests an endorsement from Dr. King on the creation of a non-violent training film by The Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Letter from Thomas M. Ward to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Thomas M. Ward, Assistant to the Minister of Calvin Presbyterian Church, requests that Dr. King provide documentation to defend against allegations of being a Communist or Communist sympathizer.

MLK Makes Request About Bill Stein

Monday, November 21, 1966

Dr. King requests that the Protestant Episcopal Church of New York allow Bill Stein to continue his work with SCLC programs.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Comments on John F. Kennedy by MLK at the Berlin Festival

Sunday, September 13, 1964

Dr. King gave this speech at the Berlin Freedom Festival in Berlin, West Germany, in memorial to the recently assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Dr. King reflects on the personality, achievements and enormous influence Kennedy had on the world. He highlights Kennedy's commitment to international human rights, which included recognition of Negro rights, and his leadership in concluding the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Letter to Mr. Wilkinson from Dr. Schrade

Monday, May 3, 1965

Dr. Schrade asks Mr. Wilkinson in the NAACP office in New York to pass on a request for Dr. King to write an article for his magazine. Previous Nobel Prize winners have submitted an autograph photo and a short biography to the magazine. In additional to the requested article, Dr. Schrade hopes Dr. King will do the same.

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

Saturday, March 4, 1967

This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Spelman College Founders Day

Sunday, April 10, 1960

This is a program for Spelman College's Seventy-Ninth Anniversary Founders Day celebration, which featured an address by Dr. King.

Letter to Andrew Young from Irving Kaler

Thursday, February 16, 1967

Kaler writes to express excitement in the SCLC working with The Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta (of which he is a part). He looks forward to discussing ways in which both organizations can compliment each other.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Primer For Delegates to the Democratic National Convention

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party informs citizens of the mistreatment incurred by African Americans attempting to register to vote and participate in election process. The Party also outlines its journey to sending 64 delegates to the Democratic Convention of 1964 and how President Johnson denied them seats at the Convention.

Dr. King Announces Appointments in SCLC Operation Breadbasket

Monday, January 29, 1968

Dr. King announces two major appointments to the SCLC Operation Breadbasket staff. Reverend Jesse Jackson is named National Director and Reverend Calvin Morris is named Associate Director in Chicago. Operation Breadbasket was formed in 1962 to improve economic conditions in black communities throughout the US.

Letter from Woodrow T. Hughes to MLK

Monday, April 18, 1966

This letter from Woodrow Hughes and Norman Seay of the Kinloch Gateway Center invites Dr. King to speak at their Second Annual City Wide Workshop. The letter refers to an enclosure with basic information about the city of Kinloch, Missouri. Kinloch is one of the largest all-black cities in the United States

Augustine (Concept of Evil)

Dr. King quotes theologian St. Augustine's "Confessions."

Instructions for Honorary Degree Recipients

This document reflects instructions for Dr. King as the recipient of an honorary degree from Yale University. The program also includes some random handwritten notes by Dr. King and information regarding his seating arrangement.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Wilfred Laurier Husband to John B. Oakes of the New York Times

Friday, April 7, 1967

Wilfred Husband writes John Oakes, Editorial Page Editor of the New York Times, regarding an article. As a consistent reader of the Magazine, Husband expresses his displeasure with an article that refers to the civil right movement's attention to the war in Vietnam as "wasteful and self-defeating." Husband explains how war and civil rights are inseparable and that stating anything in opposition hurts the cause of the movement.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Robert Green requests for Dr. King to write an introduction to the book, "Education and the Urban Poor."

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

Sunday, September 14, 1958

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

Letter from Kerry Clayton to MLK 11/20/66

Sunday, November 20, 1966

Kerry Clayton informs Dr. King that she was asked to do a third grade report about his life. She also requested for Dr. King to send a picture to include in the report. Kerry Clayton was a resident of China Lake, California.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

Ed Clayton creates a brochure on behalf of SCLC. The brochure contains a message from Dr. King, pictures of SCLC members, a history of the organization and information regarding their initiatives.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.