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Letter from Robert Hatch to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Robert Hatch, a staff associate with the National Education Association, asks Miss McDonald to inform Dr. King of an invitation to speak at the organization's banquet in New York City. Hatch mentions that he is not only a former Morehouse classmate of Dr. King's, but also lived in Montgomery, Alabama at the same time as Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy.

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

Letter from MLK to Bert Onne

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King takes an opportunity to thank Bert Onne of Stockholm for his assistance in supporting the SCLC's Freedom Movement in Chicago.

Dignitaries Attending the Spring Moblization

Presented here is a list of political and social leaders attending a mobilization held in the spring.

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Royalty Statement for Strength To Love

This financial document from Joan Daves, an agent of Harper & Row in New York City, references an itemized Royalty statement for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

Crozer Theological Seminary Brochure

This brochure provides information about Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. The brochure lists full details of the campus, programs of study, and admissions.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Saturday, November 24, 1962

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

Letter from Enrique Meneses to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Enrique Meneses writes to Dr. King requesting a television appearance by the Reverend for the Spanish magazine, "TELE-Radio."

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to John H. Calhoun

Dr. and Mrs. King deliver their condolences for the recent passing of Mason, brother of John H. Calhoun. The Kings informs Mr. Calhoun that he is not alone in his hour of mourning and that the community is also suffering this great loss.

Letter from Nils K. Stahle to MLK

Friday, November 27, 1964

Nils K. Stahle, Executive Director of the Nobel Foundation, invites Dr. King to visit the Nobel House in Stockholm while he is Sweden for a special ecumenical service.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to the Women's Strike for Peace

Saturday, June 22, 1963

Mrs. King writes to the Women's Strike for Peace to extend her appreciation for their support in the area of civil rights.

Letter from Norman Thomas to the New York Times Editor

Monday, August 28, 1967

Norman Thomas cites an excerpt from a story by Peter Khiss entitled "Rowan Terms Dr. King's Stand on War a Peril to Rights Gains." Mr. Thomas asserts that the statement is incorrect and that he whole "heartily" applauds Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

Telegram from Mike Bibler to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Mike Bibler contends that "our lame duck president" can "do more for black people than any other man in history." This telegram was sent following President Johnson's announcement that he would not seek re-election.

Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

Letter to MLK on Anti-Semitism

Friday, November 4, 1966

M.C. Gettinger, Executive Director at the Atlanta Jewish Community Council, writes to express dismay about alleged remarks about Jews made by Hosea Williams at Spelman College.

Telegram from Gitta Gossmann to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Gossmann sends Dr. King a royalty check for his book "Why We Can't Wait" in the amount of $3,448.76.

Letter from William M. Grayson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, March 13, 1962

William M. Grayson, President of a chapter of the NAACP in West Virginia, requests information regarding Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements for 1963.

Man (Hamlet)

Dr. King quotes from the Shakespearean play.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Questions Which Easter Answers

Dr. King writes a sermon entitled, "Questions Which Easter Answers." King asserts that while many people attend church on Easter because of its value as it relates to Christ, the true significance in Easter is in the fact that is makes one think of immortality; as symbolized in Jesus Christ.

Letter from Lily E. Sternlow to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

With topics ranging from "The Poor Pay More for Less" to the featured article "Malawi's Anti-Christian Atrocities - A Shame on Africa," this edition of "Awake" magazine is forwarded by Lily Sternlow to Dr. King. After receiving word of Dr. King's travels to Africa, Sternlow brings attention to issues surrounding Christian witnesses in Malawi.

Letter from Carleton L. Spier to MLK

Wednesday, January 11, 1967

Spier shares his disapproval of Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell and his concern regarding Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

Schools' Mobile TV Unit Tapes Dr. King's Speech

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

This news article highlights Darien, Connecticut for the use of their mobile television unit to tape Dr. King's speech. The mobile studio was moved to Stamford High School, where students filmed the speech. Ten other schools in the area were able to see Dr. King speak with the help of this new technology.