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"HUNGARY"

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Totalitarianism

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Letter from Nancy and Bill Brodie to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Nancy and Bill Brodie write Mrs. King to express their sympathy regarding Dr. King's assassination. As a method to comfort Mrs. King, Nancy includes a poem that she wrote for her father when he died.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 13, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee, attempts to reschedule an event previously canceled by Dr. King. Shaefer informs Dr. King's secretary, Ms. McDonald, of the hundreds of people that purchased tickets to attend the event and their desire to have it rescheduled.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politics

Monday, December 20, 1965

Paul Albert forwards this letter to all individuals invited to and interested in the Shoreham Conference, in which Liberals address the shortcomings of American politics.

Recommendations to Committee on Future Program

Tuesday, October 27, 1959

Dr. King outlines several initiatives of the SCLC and other civil rights leaders.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Bertha Nichols to MLK

Thursday, February 4, 1965

Dr. King is extended an invitation to deliver the keynote address for the 70th birthday of E. Washington Rhodes, Publisher of the Philadelphia Tribune. The Philadelphia Tribune is one of the nation's oldest bi-weekly Negro newspapers and Rhodes is a well-known staunch advocate for justice. Bertha Nichols, Secretary-Treasurer of the newspaper, asks Dr. King to make a special address in honor of Rhodes.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Transformed Nonconformist

In this draft of the "Transformed Nonconformist", Dr. King urges the abandonment of societal practices of injustice.

Soren Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes about Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard's first stage at which men live, aesthetics.

Letter from SANE's Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Dr. Benjamin Spock requests the support of the SCLC for "A Rally for Peace in Vietnam." Dr. Spock informs Dr. King, that the rally will advocate for immediate actions concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dimitri Papaspyrou, President of the Parliament, invites Dr. King to Greece to create a better understanding between Greek and American people.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

William Rutherford recounts his difficulties trying to contact Dr. King while he was in the United States. He goes on to express interest in doing fundraising programs for SCLC in Europe, as well as, mobilizing public opinion in support of the cause.

Letter from John A. Collison to MLK

Saturday, August 15, 1964

John Collision writes Dr. King regarding race relations in America. Collision wants Dr. King to understand that majority of whites have no hatred toward blacks, but instead "a strangeness" and questioning of why people are different shades.

Letter to SCLC from Preston Warren

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Bucknell University Department of Philosophy Chairman Preston Warren, a supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, reduces his usual $5 contribution to $1 because of his disagreements with Dr. King's stance against the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Thomas Hejzlar to MLK

Friday, December 1, 1967

Student Thomas Hejzlar of Czechoslovakia writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph. He includes a postcard for Dr. King to sign and return.

News from the Southern Conference Educational Fund

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. discusses the allegations and trials of Thomas Carlton Wansley.

The American Dream

The is a draft outline of Dr. King's "The American Dream" speech delivered at many colleges, universities and churches throughout the country. Dr. King urges Americans to abandon practices of discrimination in order to protect the American dream and the proliferation of the nation.

SCLC Newsletter: April - May 1964

This second volume of the SCLC Newsletter includes a wide variety of articles on the organization's recent interests and activities. The feature article reports the success of the historic Selma to Montgomery march, and other articles touch on the SCLC's efforts to register new voters.

Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Norman Walsh to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Norman Walsh thanks Dr. King for being a spokesperson for Vietnam, poverty, and civil rights.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

Letter from SNCC Executive Committee to MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

John Lewis and Silas Norman of SNCC write Dr. King to address their organization's grievances with the SCLC, specifically the SCLC's lack of cooperation in the Selma Voting Rights campaign. Members of SNCC state their disagreement with the march planned for March 7, 1965 because "the objectives of the march do not justify the danger and the resources involved." Lewis and Norman request a meeting with Dr. King to discuss reconciliation between SNCC and the SCLC.