Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"HUNGARY"

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims

Tuesday, November 6, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King informs Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims that due to his multiple responsibilities within the SCLC and his various pastoral duties, he will not be able to accept speaking engagements at this time. He assures her that if his schedule clears up, he will be happy to accept her "gracious invitation."

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Friday, February 19, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

Goldwater's Nomination

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

Letter from Fernando DeEquidazu to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965
SPAIN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Students from Spain write Dr. King, showing their appreciation for his leadership to the Civil Rights Movement, and asks if Dr. King can supply them with articles for magazines in Spain.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
CANADA

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Letter from Nigerian Man to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
NIGERIA, Atlanta, GA

An affectionate admirer writes Dr. King to express his plans to take up studies in aeromechanics at a vocational school in the United States. The Nigerian native requests sponsorship from the Reverend and his organization to assist in this attempt.

Note Card on Democritus' Metaphysics

In this notecard, Dr. King writes on the subject of Metaphysics, focusing on the works of Democritus.

Letter from some White Citizens of Mississippi to MLK about a Wedding

Wednesday, July 27, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

In this letter Mrs. A.N. Brown and several others express their interest in having Dr. King demonstrate in front of a church at which Lucy Johnson will be getting married.

Preaching

Dr. King quotes Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Letter from James McKee to Dora McDonald Concerning MLK's Antioch Commencement Address

Friday, April 2, 1965
Ohio (OH)

James McKee, Chief of the Yellow Springs Police Department, writes Dora McDonald regarding security arrangements for Dr. King's visit to Yellow Springs, Ohio for Antioch College's Commencement.

Relation Between Eternal Objects and Actual Occasions

Philosophically rooted, the set of notes on this series of cards explores metaphysical claims for the understanding that each "eternal object" is necessarily connected to an "actual occasion." Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" and speaks to the actualization of an event as result of possibilities.

Telegram from MLK to Jesse Hill

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
Missouri (MO)

Dr. King sends condolences to Jesse Hill regarding the loss of his grandmother.

An Edition of the SCLC Newsletter

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

This April/May 1964 SCLC newsletter highlights the recent accomplishments of the SCLC and its members. Some of the topics discussed are the 50-mile march from Selma to Montgomery, Ben Hooks' recent judicial appointment, and Dr. King being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Gunnar Fagerberg to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964
SWEDEN, Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is the recipient of this invitation to speak made by the students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines a definition of "Nature". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.

Holiday Card to Mrs. King

This holiday card was sent to Mrs. King from the Miller Family.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Tokyo, Japan, JAPAN

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

Western Union Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Count Basie to Dr. King

New York (NY)

Famous jazz musician, Count Basie and his wife Catherine, sent Dr. King this Western Union telegram, following Dr. King's nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem. The Basie family, offered Dr. King any assistance he may have needed during his recovery.

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967
Washington, D.C., Kentucky (KY), VIETNAM, Louisville, KY

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from Eva Ban to MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), BRAZIL

Eva Ban, of the Brazilian newspaper "Cruzeiro," requests an interview with Dr. King in order to do a story on American race relations. Ban also asserts that there is no racism or discrimination in Brazil.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

The Negro Heritage Library

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), BURUNDI, CAMEROON, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, CHAD, CONGO / ZAIRE, ETHIOPIA, GABON, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, Co'te D'IVOIRE / IVORY COAST, KENYA, LIBERIA, MALAWI, MALI, NIGER, NIGERIA, RWANDA, SENEGAL, SIERRA LEONE, TOGO, UGANDA, ZAMBIA

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Man

Dr. King quotes Proverbs 3:5 on human insight and knowledge and reflects upon its meaning.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964
Missouri (MO), INDIA

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Thursday, February 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

Letter from R. William Johnson to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Bill Johnson writes Dr. King with an interest in starting a chapter of the SCLC in Oak Ridge. Johnson also invites Dr. King to visit Oak Ridge and speak with members of its community.

Letter From William S. Minor to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), Selma, AL

William S. Minor writes Dr. King thanking him for responding to a personal invite regarding research on racial revolution.

God

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."