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"HUNGARY"

Letter from Juanita to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Juanita offers praise and gratitude to Dr. King for his assistance regarding some imprisoned associates. Juanita also offers her prayers to Dr. King.

Problem of Evil Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the problem of evil. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verse.

Telegram from C. C. Shell to MLK

C. C. Shells writes Dr. King suggesting that segregationist Lester Maddox run for President of the United State with Dr. King as Vice President.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

H. Rap Brown Requests SNCC Support

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's New York office of International Affairs, requests support during the August 27, 1967 boycott of General Motors. After declaring itself a Human Rights organization, SNCC requests support in the worldwide struggle for human rights, especially black liberation schools in the United States.

Happiness

Dr. King outlines insight from philosophers Spinoza and Nietzsche regarding the concept of happiness.

Letter from MLK to SCLC Action Committee

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Dr. King reminds members of the Action Committee of their upcoming meeting. He requests that each member come prepared to "make a report on [their] category of activity concerning the Washington Mobilization."

Materialism

Dr. King documents a quote by Robert Flint, a Scottish theologian and philosopher in reference to "materialism" from the "Baird Lectures."

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

Monday, June 17, 1963

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from MLK to Edwin D. Hoffman

Tuesday, December 29, 1964

Dr. King informs Dr. Edwin Hoffman of his inability to speak at the American Forum in West Virginia. Dr. King states that he will be focusing more attention to the Civil Rights and may not be available to speak at many events due to his limited schedule.

Memorandum to Files

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Letter from United States Congress to MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Joseph McDade writes Dr. King to solicit his views regarding the affects of organized crime on the plight of the urban poor.

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Universalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines some fundamental principles of "Universalism".

Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

Newspaper Article Concerning Peace in North Vietnam

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

This document contains two articles from various newspapers. The first article concerns the call of South Vietnamese Roman Catholic Bishops for the end of U.S. aggression towards North Vietnam. The second article concerns a South Vietnamese Roman Catholic woman who has asked the Pope to become a hostage for a day.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Monday, January 18, 1965

Adlai Stevenson, US Ambassador to the United Nations, thanks Dr. King for a previous letter and for Dr. King's attendance at a reception at the United States Mission. Stevenson also congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Lette from Alta Yount to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Alta Yount expresses her approval of a speech that Dr. King delivered. She also requests some copies of it.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Rosen to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Mrs. Samuel Rosen writes Dr. King recollecting when she marched with him in Montgomery. Rosen states that she and her husband are proud of Dr. King and his works regarding the Vietnam War.

Notice from Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Here is a letter to stimulate local civil rights organizations to undertake visits to House and Senate members during Easter Recess. The visits were to push for legislative goals such as "at least a million jobs for the hardcore unemployed, decent low cost housing for all and repeal of punitive welfare restrictions." The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights issued this notice, in the days following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Joseph A. Howell to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Mr. Howell requests that Dr. King support the efforts of the United Church of Christ to stop smoking in America.

Letter from Gulf Oil Corporation to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Craig Thompson, Director of Public Relations, informs Dr. King of Gulf Oil's discontent regarding the confusion of objectives surrounding his role as a world peacemaker. He informs Dr. King that their continued support will be provided to other respected Negro organizations "devoting their energies to the fundamental issues of the Negro's place in America."

Letter from MLK to Linda Cann

Tuesday, November 30, 1965

Dr. King writes Linda Cann, a member of the Canadian Women's Press Club in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He informs Mrs. Cann that he cannot accept her invitation to speak in Nova Scotia because he is trying to "grapple with the problems of discrimination that Negroes still face."

Telegram from Frederick Dennard to MLK

Reverend Frederick Dennard, Executive Director of the Harlem Interfaith Counseling Service, invites Dr. King to speak at a fundraising banquet.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."