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Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Saturday, November 12, 1966

In this letter, Ms. McDonald encloses biographical sketches to accompany Dr. King's lecture, "The Future of Integration."

Letter to MLK from Mrs. Mary Jane Chattams

Friday, November 17, 1967

Mrs. Chattams, a student, has contacted Dr. King for further clarity regarding a sermon he reportedly delivered in a Communist Church. Sharing Dr. King’s comments will be informative and beneficial for future class discussions.

KCLS Radio Editorial about MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

James C. Garchow, of KCLS Radio, sent Dr. King a transcript of an editorial to comply with the Fairness Doctrine of the F.C.C. that mandates an opportunity to reply to such commentary.

Letter from David Puckett to MLK

Saturday, September 3, 1966

David Puckett writes Dr. King on behalf of the poor whites in the Uptown area of Chicago. Puckett asks Dr. King to support the upcoming rally and march, where they will demand the release of Sam Joseph O'Donnell and protest against the police.

Expenses for Delegates

This detailed list breaks down the travel, registration and room costs for delegates of several Southern states throughout the country.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

Monroe, Mich. News, "From the Book Bag"

Monday, June 26, 1967

A review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was published by the Monroe, Michigan newspaper. The review outlined the positions Dr. King took on the Vietnam War and the Black Power movement. The author of this review considered Dr. King to be "an advocate-articulate, persistent and exhortative." Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" was published and released in 1967.

Letter from C. B. Kelley to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

C. B. Kelley shares his disagreement with Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Monday, December 30, 1963

The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Letter from Bernard Roche to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Roche asks Dr. King whether he has considered that whites not only intimidate and murder African Americans, but also each other. He argues that whites don't treat anyone any worse than they treat themselves.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Thich Nhat Hanh expresses his support for Dr. King and conveys his desire to meet with Dr. King during his upcoming visit to Atlanta.

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

Thursday, April 27, 1967

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Morehouse College Centennial Program

This program highlights week-long events for Morehouse College's first 100 year anniversary in 1967. One of the many notable attendees is Howard Thurman, who at that point was a close friend and mentor to Dr. King.

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

Discipline

Dr. King records a quote from Proverbs 13:24 regarding discipline and corporal punishment.

Letter from Ronald Bauer to MLK

Wednesday, January 20, 1965

Ronald Bauer congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. As President of the Inter American University, Bauer informs Dr. King of the institution's initiatives in the quest for peace. Two international conferences, sponsored by Inter American University, engages university students from all over the world. Bauer is embarking on a plan to establish his own international university and invites Dr. King to be part of a special International Advisory Council featuring notable world leaders.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Dora McDonald sends H. L. Wynter, Registrar for the University of the West Indies, an estimate on travel expenses Dr. King and Reverend Lee will require for their trip to Jamaica.

Fact Sheet on the Southern Negro Vote

Fact sheet from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference summarizing the registered Negro voters in eleven states of the South for a period ranging from 1947 to 1956

Letter from Ken Dyal to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to acknowledge receipt of a telegram and agree with his comments in reference to an enclosed supporting newspaper article.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Letter from Don Hill to MLK

Tuesday, March 5, 1963

Don Hill requests a written statement about the Emancipation Proclamation from Dr. King for inclusion in the souvenir program for the Michigan Prince Hall Grand Lodge's annual meeting. The program will celebrate the centennial anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. Hill also requests a picture to include in the program.

Map of Morehouse College

These maps are an overview of the buildings located at Morehouse College.

God

Dr. King quotes Donald M. Baillie's "God Was in Christ."

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy to William H. Oliver

Saturday, May 8, 1965

Ralph Abernathy informs Mr. Oliver that emergencies will prevent him from meeting the week of May 14th, and asks to reschedule for a later date.