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Letter from Betty Morton to MLK

Sunday, October 8, 1967

Betty Morton of Selma, Alabama writes to solicit help from Dr. King. She also informs him of her hardships with school and her family.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Julia Smith

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dora McDonald responds to Julia Smith's letter on behalf of Dr. King and informs Smith that they hope she accomplishes her dream of becoming a nurse. Miss McDonald also tells Smith that they will remember her in their prayers.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Dunbar

Monday, August 22, 1966

Dr. King writes to Dr. Leslie Dunbar to assure her that the SCLC was indeed ready and able to administer CEP Grant Funds for that school year.

Telegram from Andrew J. Young to Rev. W. Ivan Hoy

In this correspondence, Young informed Rev. Hoy due to recent events in Selma, Alabama Dr. King had cancel all his engagements for the month of February. Therefore, Dr.King would not be able to speak at the University of Miami.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Unsigned Memo to Arthur Shores

Monday, November 6, 1967

In this memo to Mr. Shores, the author wants to get an update status on eight clients that served sentences in Birmingham for parading without a permit. Dr. King was sent a copy of the memo.

Letter from Debbie Rubiano to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Arthur McDonald

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Dr. King writes Reverend Arthur McDonald expressing appreciation for his presence in Albany. He also shares with Reverend Arthur how the non-violent battle in Albany is slowly fading yet the fight for equality is not over.

Letter from Sylvester Webb to MLK

Thursday, December 23, 1965

Sylvester Webb, Sponsor of the Sixth Grade Graduating Class Gift for Edward Gideon Public School in Philidelphia, informs Dr. King that an oil portrait of him was commissioned by sixth grade class. Webb request King's appearance or one of his advisers for the ceremony to place the portrait in the school lobby. Dr. King would later send Reverend Walter Fauntroy of the SCLC's Washington bureau to represent him.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Monday, May 15, 1967

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

MLK Statement Regarding the Land Purchase Agreement with the Atlanta Housing Authority

Monday, July 31, 1967

With a purchase of land through the Atlanta Housing Authority, Dr. King announces that Ebenezer Baptist Church intends to provide new housing in an organized neighborhood near downtown Atlanta. Ebenezer Baptist Church also plans to develop a program with contracting firms to teach men the fundamentals of construction.

Letter from Lawndale Business Men's Association

Monday, January 31, 1966

The president of the Lawndale Business Men's Association, Albert Weinberg, invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker for one of the association's events.

Letter from Andrew Young to Harry Belafonte

Monday, February 28, 1966

Andrew J. Young writes Harry Belafonte applauding him on his television show "The Strolling Twenties." Unlike average shows, Belafonte delivers "high calibre performances" with the ability to articulate the realities of the American Negro. Young further expresses hope that the 1966 Freedom Festival in Chicago has a similar effect.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

Telegram from Mr. David Susskind to MLK

In this telegram, Mr. Susskind invites Dr. King to participate in a "'Open End' two hour debate with Governor George Wallace."

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Letter from Hazel Jardine to MLK and CSK

Friday, February 24, 1961

Mrs. Hazel Jardine commends Dr. King on his efforts to obtain equality for all men.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Professor & Mrs. De Branges

Monday, February 27, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King expressed appreciation to Professor and Mrs. Louis De Branges for a generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

Letter Dated 10/15/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Monday, October 15, 1962

Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a letter to Mr. Mel Arnold acknowledging the enclosure of a sermon by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "How Should a Christian View Communism?"

Dr. King's Notes on Ministry

Dr. King explains his perspective on the path of ministry as a career. In this brief paragraph, he notes that ministry is a very noble career but it is also difficult.

Suffering

Dr. King questions whether the statement in Proverbs 11:23 that the righteous are rewarded with goodness and the wicked wrath is always true.

Letter from John Barber to Mrs. A.W. Boone

Monday, November 8, 1965

John Barber, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, thanks Mrs. Boone of Atlanta's Booker T. Washington High School for agreeing to find a "Negro youngster" to become the pen pal of "a young French correspondent." The pen pal request resulted from communication between Dr. King and Dominique Pire, a Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Belgian priest.

Letter from MLK to Catherine Haney Brock

Friday, July 30, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Brock for her generous contribution to the SCLC. King expresses his sincere gratitude and discusses how his organization uses the money received from its donors.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Acronym: B.L.A.C.K. P.O.W.E.R.

This is a detailed acronym for the term "Black Power."

Telegram from Mrs. Ernest Bavely to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Mrs. Bavely sends a supportive telegram to Dr. King during his confinement at the Fulton County Jail. She assures him "children of tomorrow, tomorrow, and tomorrow, will inherit those values for which you are striving."