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The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.

Letter from MLK on behalf of Cosby Wallace

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King requests reconsideration of Mr. Cosby Wallace's status in the U. S. Army. The financial strain on Mr. Wallace’s family and a physical disability warrants his not being inducted.

Letter from Mr. Paul W. Moon to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 17, 1963

Paul Hoon of the Union Theological Seminary, asks Ms. McDonald if the invitation formerly extended to Dr. King has had any change in status.

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

MLK Sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, January 16, 1966

As pastor of Ebenezer, Dr. King delivered this particular sermon to his congregation in January of 196. He begins by referencing representative-elect Julian Bond's statement against war and against America's involvement in Vietnam, and he commends Mr. Bond for being courageous enough to speak his mind. He uses quotes from historical figures and biblical passages to support his claim that humans should be men of conviction and not of conformity. Dr.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty Project Summary

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty summarizes a nationwide project focused on eradicating poverty, providing funding for education, and creating more effective ways to utilize welfare spending.

Catholic Interracial Council's JFK Awards Dinner Honoring MLK Brochure

Thursday, October 29, 1964

This brochure outlines the Catholic Interracial Council's (CIC) John F. Kennedy Awards Dinner honoring Dr. King, to be held on October 29, 1968. In addition to describing the mission of the dinner, the brochure adds a description of the CIC and a biography of Dr. King. Also included is an article and photo from Dr. King's visit with Pope Paul VI.

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.

Letter from Ms. Anne Braden to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Ms. Braden, staff member of the SCEF, writes Dr. King regarding fellow staff member, Joe Mulloy, who was planning to refuse induction into the US Army. In light of a recent SCLC member making a similar decision, Ms. Braden requests support from Dr. King.

Monism

Dr. King cites the many ways in which the concept of Monism is applied.

Letter from President Johnson to Alan Westin

Monday, February 28, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Professor Alan Westin, of Columbia University, to congratulate him on the formation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Questions Which Easter Answers

Dr. King writes a sermon entitled, "Questions Which Easter Answers." King asserts that while many people attend church on Easter because of its value as it relates to Christ, the true significance in Easter is in the fact that is makes one think of immortality; as symbolized in Jesus Christ.

Letter from Harry B. Henderson Jr. to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Harry Henderson writes Dr. King in support of Dr. King's stance on Vietnam. Henderson expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's "clearout and moving" speech regarding the United State's presence in Vietnam and he feels that only clergymen can take an effective stance. He also discusses how the Vietnam War is used as a scapegoat to keep the government from having to deal with discrimination issues in America.

Letter from MLK to William B. Simpkins

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Simpkins, in which Simpkins discusses freedom and perfect justice. Dr. King thanks Simpkins for the letter and comments that Simpkins' letter has provided "additional food for contemplation."

Thank You Letter from Mary Keller to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

This letter from Mary Keller to Dr. King thanks him for his speech given at Grosse Pointe High School on March 14, 1968. Keller apologizes for the behavior of some "troublemakers" during the event.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK about Request

Monday, October 26, 1964

Alfred Duckett writes this letter to Dr. King in order to remind Dr. King of his desire to have a magazine article or television special done on him and stresses the need to present Dr. King's role "not only as a civil rights leader, but also as a father, pastor, husband, and administrator of a steadily-growing national organization." Mr. Duckett also presents the terms of a proposed publishing contract, should he wish to become a part of the project.

Letter from MLK to Thomas R. Jones

Monday, July 29, 1963

Dr. King thanks the Honorable Thomas R. Jones for his financial and moral support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa: Advance Registration

Monday, January 9, 1967

Theodore E. Brown, the Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, sends a letter with attached registration forms for the Third Biennial National Conference.

Note to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

In a brief note, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of an enclosed British publisher's catalogue for his review.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966

Dr. Mays presents Dr. King with a $300 honorarium for giving the first convocation address at Morehouse College.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Response Letter from Miss D. McDonald to Professor Paul Kurt Ackerman

Thursday, July 13, 1967

This letter is in response to Professor Paul Kurt Ackermann from Miss. D. McDonald, c/o MLK, referencing a request for submission of Dr. King's manuscript.

Homogeneous Thoughts & Heterogeneous Thoughts

Dr. King describes Alfred North Whitehead's distinction between homogeneous and heterogeneous thought in "The Concept of Nature."

Sermon Notes of Dr. King

The document, seen here, contains sermon notes written by Dr. King. The tittle of this sermon is listed as "The Jungles of Life", with the scripture passage coming from Jeremiah 12:5.

Letter from Nils K. Stahle to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 2, 1964

The Director of the Nobel Foundation, Niles K. Stahle, explains the copyright of Dr. King's Nobel Lecture. Stahle states that the Lecture belongs to the Nobel Foundation and that measures will be taken to preserve its integrity.