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CORE - Progress Report #1

Friday, August 20, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

California (CA), VIETNAM

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Let My People Vote

New York, NY, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Telegram from Thomas K. Gilmool and David N. Wice to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, San Francisco, CA, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. Gilmool and Mr. Wice write to confirm the date that Dr. King will be speaking at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Mary Bonaventure

Ohio (OH), South Carolina (SC)

The author writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy to express how impressed she was with the events surrounding Dr. King's funeral. She also made a lengthy request for mementos of the funeral service and Dr. King's speeches.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Albany, GA

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Flight Schedule for Coretta Scott King and Party

Tuesday, December 1, 1964
Atlanta, GA, London, England, New York, NY, FRANCE, Oslo, Norway, Stockholm, Sweden, DENMARK, Georgia (GA), UNITED KINGDOM, New York (NY)

The Henderson Travel Service provides a detailed schedule of suggested flights for Coretta Scott King and others traveling to witness Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from David T. Doherty to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964
Oregon (OR)

David T. Doherty, President of the Western Regional Interfraternity Council, invites Dr. King to attend the W.R.I.F.C. Conference in April to express his views on the role of fraternities within American culture.

Letter from Arthur Abba Goldberg to Dr. King about Conducting Seminars for SCLC

Friday, January 12, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

Arthur Abba Goldberg, Deputy Attorney General for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs and the Housing Finance Agency is sending a copy of his resume to Dr. King, and expresses his interest in conducting seminars in the field of housing or housing finance.

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967
Atlanta, GA

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Letter from MLK to Herschel McGee about a Corporation

Monday, October 4, 1965
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH

In this letter Dr. King thanks Mr. McGee for his $50.00 check for the starting of a corporation for Negroes, but he lets McGee know that he is unable to concentrate on the devlopment and is returning his check.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

California (CA)

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

Letter to Martin Luther King Jr. from Clement Alexandre 1957

Friday, October 4, 1957
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King received this letter from Doubleday & Company, regarding offering Dr. King royalties to write his first book. The owner/publisher of Doubleday, Clement Alexandre, tried to persuade Dr. King to work with them on a book that would expand his base of influence. The book would relate to issues of civil and political issues.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to John H. Bustamente

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Chauncey Eskridge elaborates on the financial details associated with the Belafonte Benefit Concerts. He also requests some help in overcoming the deficit created by the concert.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966
Nevada (NV), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Letter to MLK from Guy Dauncey

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Guy Dauncey, Chairman of the Human Rights Committee at Nottingham University, offered this request for Dr. King to visit England, in March of 1968. The content, within the letter, placed emphasis on special events surrounding "Human Rights Year 1968", to begin a progressive Civil and Human Rights movement in England.

Soap, Brush Help

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.

Telegram from Richard Beyer to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965
Washington (WA), CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Richard Beyer telegrams Dr. King inquiring if he is available to speak at a peace rally in Washington sponsored by Canadian and Northwest Peace groups.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Letter from Andrew Young to Reverend B. J. Cameron

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Andrew Young, acting as Executive Assistant to Dr. King, responds to Rev. Cameron's letter regarding SCLC's involvement in Grenada, Mississippi. He assures Rev. Cameron that the SCLC has not forgotten about Grenada and discusses plans to see him in the future.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965
New York (NY), CHINA

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Friday, November 18, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Syllabus for the History of Christianity

FRANCE, GERMANY, SWITZERLAND, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document is a course syllabus for the History of Christianity.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966
VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from Clarence D. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Director of the Southern Region of the National Urban League, Clarence D. Coleman, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the 1964 Nobel Piece Prize. Coleman extends his very best wishes to Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of the staff of the Southern Regional Office of the National Urban League and the officers and members of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Mike Bibler to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Mike Bibler contends that "our lame duck president" can "do more for black people than any other man in history." This telegram was sent following President Johnson's announcement that he would not seek re-election.