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Letter from Clarence B. Jones to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 16, 1967

Clarence B. Jones writes Dora McDonald to inform her of his travel plans to Los Angeles, California.

Sin

Dr. King notes that I Chronicles 21:1 says that Satan ordered David to conduct a census but that another account indicates it was the Lord. He questions why it was regarded as sinful to take a census.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Benjamin E. Mays

Monday, May 4, 1964

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Benjamin E. Mays that an advance copy of Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," is being sent in appreciation of Dr. Mays' support.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Monday, December 2, 1963

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

Appeal to Billy Graham Regarding Religion

Matakichi Saito questions Billy Graham about his views on religion as it relates to discrimination.

Nobel Peace Prize Dinner Program

Monday, January 27, 1964

The citizens of Atlanta held a recognition dinner on January 27, 1965 to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize. Tributes were offered by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., AME Bishop Ernest Hickman, Rev. Edward Driscoll of the Georgia Council of Churches, State Senator Leroy Johnson, and Roman Catholic Archbishop Paul Hallinan. Dr. King gave the address.

Letter from Wesley Hotchkiss to Associates of the Citizen Education Project

Wednesday, September 7, 1966

Mr. Hotchkiss, the General Secretary of the AMA and primary UCBHM representative for the CEP, writes employees to clear up confusion regarding the administrative structure of the CEP. He informs employees that the the CEP is administered by the UCBHM stating, "When staff are confused about their employer it usually means they are confused about their objectives." The organization's most important objective, Mr. Hotchkiss asserts, is to mobilize individuals who have been trained under the CEP to focus the skills they have acquired on community development.

SCLC Press Release: 1967 Election Results

This SCLC release hails the election of America's first two black mayors, Carl Stokes in Cleveland, Ohio and Richard Hatcher in Gary, Indiana. The release stresses that such men "cannot do the job alone" and condemns efforts in Congress to cut the War on Poverty even as billions are spent on the Vietnam War.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Albert A. Goldman

Tuesday, July 13, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King informs Rabbi Albert A. Goldman that he will not be able to be a speaker at the Community Thanksgiving Services at The Isaac M. Wise Temple this year.

Letter from W. Warner Beckett to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967

Mr. Beckett, a publisher at New Lady Magazine, writes to Dr. King requesting that he lead an "armada" of people with the intent of focusing on businesses and industries. Mr. Beckett believes that Negroes and concerned whites should fight against large businesses by "diverting money from key industries."

Buddhism

Dr. King quotes James Bissett Pratt's "The Religious Consciousness: A Psychological Study."

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Clarence Lundquist

Thursday, March 15, 1962

Dr. King writes to the administrator of wage hour and public contracts division for the U.S. Department of Labor, Clarence Lundquist. In this telegram, Dr. King requests that Lundquist investigate a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act at Seapak Shrimp Factories. It is here that African Americans were told to sign statements that said they were handicapped. If the forms were signed the African American workers received significantly lower wages than before.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Letter to MLK from Ray Cerreta

Mr. Ray Cerreta, of Jackson Heights, New York, requests an autograph from Dr. King for his personal collection.

Martin Luther King To Speak in Ithaca

Tuesday, March 28, 1961

This article from the Ithaca Journal talks about Dr. King's speaking engagement at Cornell University's Bailey Hall in Ithaca. The article also gives some background information on Dr. King.

Letter to Dr. King from Muriel Pettit

Friday, September 13, 1968

A supporter writes to Dr. King requesting information to be used in a research paper.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Aaron Edgar Oliver writes Dr. King to give thanks for his efforts to try and lead the Republican convention in its choice of a candidate.

The United States and Eastern Asia: The Report of a Conference of Asian Scholars

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Harry D. Gideonse, President of Freedom House, sends Dr. King two reports concerning international relations between the United States and Asia. The first of the two is a report on the international policies that have been implemented between Western nations and the countries of Asia. The second is a report that tracks the progress of freedom throughout those regions.

Traditionalism

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman’s “Introduction to Philosophy.”

Problem of Evil Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the problem of evil. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verse.

etter from Mrs. Howard Wood to MLK

Mrs. Howard Wood conveys her support to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement after reading the novel "Stride Toward Freedom."

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King agrees that the United Civil Rights Leadership Council should be dissolved.

Atlanta Operation Breadbasket Bi-Annual Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Reverend Fred C. Bennette, Jr. issues the bi-annual report for the Atlanta Chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Bennette expounds on the mission of Dr. King and the SCLC to create economic opportunities through advances in employment.

Letter from Kenneth Bells to Floyd McKissick

Friday, September 16, 1966

Kenneth Bells requests to be removed from the Congress of Racial Equality's list of potential contributors due to CORE's support of the Black Power Movement.

MLK Addresses Riots and War

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Dr. King encourages friends to support nonviolence in order to avoid physical or moral destruction. He explains that the, "SCLC cannot support riots for moral and pragmatic reasons."