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Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968
Florida (FL), Orangeburg, SC

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 27, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves sends three checks to Dr. King. The first check is an advance due from Harper and Row, the second represents an advance from NAL and the third is a partial payment from "Life."

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Randall Elias

Thursday, December 30, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This letter is Dr. King's reply to Mr. Randall Elias's letter regarding a civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield. Dr. King writes that the SCLC is in Chicago, but is unaware of any planned civil rights march .

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Maurice B. Fagan

Wednesday, December 27, 1967
Indiana (IN), Philadelphia, PA

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald confirms receipt of recent letter from Mr.Maurice Fagan. She conveys to Mr. Fagan of Dr. King's desire to nominate The Honorable Richard Hatcher Mayor of Gary, Indiana, for the 1967 National Fellowship Award.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.


Dr. King quotes Aristotle's "Physics, Book II" and notes Spinoza's view of nature.

Saturday Review: Behind the Selma March

Saturday, April 3, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King describes the events surrounding the Selma-Montgomery Civil Rights March of 1965.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1960
North Carolina (NC)

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

Remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School

Tuesday, March 8, 1960
Wisconsin (WI), Indiana (IN), Ohio (OH), London, England, FRANCE, INDIA, ITALY, Minnesota (MN), INDONESIA, CHINA, POLAND, IRELAND, Massachusetts (MA)

Harris Wofford, Jr. gives these remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School on March 8, 1960. Wofford has several ties with Dr. King in cases such as arranging a trip to India, helping to write "Stride Toward Freedom," and negotiating with Senator Kennedy and Vice-President Nixon during the 1960 presidential campaign. In addition, Wofford was the Special Assistant for Civil Rights under U. S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

Staff of SCLC

The SCLC lists its executive, field and clerical staff.


Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Maurice Dawkins informs Dr. King that their meeting is being followed up with action in various regions and with cooperation of the OEO Regional Directors and Civil Rights Coordinators.

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Oklahoma (OK)

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

Letter from H. C. Whitley to MLK

Friday, September 3, 1965

H. C. Huntley invites Dr. King to come speak at St. Giles Cathedral in Scotland during Holy Week.

Life (Poem)

Dr. King writes down part of playwright and composer Sir Noël Coward’s song “Twentieth Century Blues.”

Letter from Richard Landau of Antioch College to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Richard Landau, Editor of The Antiochian, writes Dr. King requesting a photograph and "biographical data sheet" for a story about his upcoming appearance as the commencement speaker.

Letter From Martin Peretz to MLK

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Martin Peretz asks Dr. King for an autograph while commending his courage in the struggle for justice and peace.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959
Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL)

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Letter from Rev. Celestine Fernado to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY)

The Editor of the Ceylon Churchman, Reverend Celestine Fernando, request a copy of Dr. King's letter from jail to publish in the magazine. Reverend Fernando is certain that this publication is a great message and will allow the church to re-evaluate its work.

News Clipping Pertaining to Job Corp March

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Michigan (MI)

The article references a series of hostile altercations between the trainees at a local Job Corps and the residents of Battle Creek.

The Hard or the Easy Way?

Thursday, October 5, 1961
Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Arkansas (AR), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council discusses the topics of school segregation and integration in specific southern states and counties, especially Yancey County, North Carolina.

Letter from Jennings Randolph to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Jennings Randolph writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his previous telegram regarding support of the Voting Rights bill which would abolish poll taxes.

Document Cover Page

Monday, January 15, 1968

This document, dated January 15, 1968, from Johnson Publishing Company is a cover page titled "For Dr. King."

Letter from William L. Harris to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968
Virginia (VA)

William Harris, vice-chairman of the Extra Legal Forum at the Law School of the University of Virginia, invites Dr. King to speak at a Forum event.

Letter from The Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club to Dr. King

Thursday, October 2, 1958
New York, NY

Samuel Baskerville, of the Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club, wrote to Dr. King out of sympathy, for his nearly fatal stabbing at a department store in Harlem. Mr. Baskerville, on behalf of his organization, conveyed their delight in knowing of Dr. King's survival, per various press releases.

Telegram from Trinity Cathedral to MLK

Friday, May 24, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Members of Trinity Cathedral in Newark, New Jersey offer their support to Dr. King and others "who are endangering your lives for the sake of others." Dr. King received this telegram in the midst of the desegregation campaign in Birmingham, 1963.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967
Atlantic City, NJ, Philadelphia, PA, Washington, D.C.

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.