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Invitation from the Negro American Labor Council to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965
Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the Negro American Labor Council, August Hill invites Dr. King to visit Racine, Wisconsin. He tells Dr. King that they are suffering from problems regarding employment in addition to all of the other inequalities. He also says that their community is not involved and that they need to be concerned about the issues in their society.

Telegram from Uppsala Student to MLK

Monday, November 9, 1964
Washington, D.C., SWEDEN

Student organizations in Sweden invite Dr. King to Uppsala during his visit to Scandinavia.

Letter to Monsier Sempe from Joan Daves

Thursday, October 17, 1963
New York (NY), FRANCE

This is a letter stating that Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" cannot be used in any books because Dr. King wants it to appear in his own book first and it cannot be used before a French version of that book becomes available. Any translation and duplication of his letter violates copyright laws.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Canon L. John Collins

Friday, January 3, 1969
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Mrs. King confirms with Canon L. John Collins the dates of her visit to England.

Telegram from Truman Douglass to MLK about Pending Letter

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

This telegram was sent to Dr. King from Truman D. Douglass regarding an upcoming telegram pertaining to nine conditions set forth in an earlier letter. Douglass is the Chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from Jefferson Poland to MLK

San Francisco, CA, Florida (FL)

Following the death of his grandfather, Jefferson Poland corresponds with Dr. King to share his belief in man's divinity. After a life of discrimination, Poland's grandfather, Ross Mullin, wrote a poem to Dr. King which criticized prejudice. This transformation after sixty years of hatred represents man's continuous growth.

Letter to Mrs. Levi Hamiliton from Dora McDonald

Thursday, August 15, 1963
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald informs Levi Hamilton that Dr. King perceived the mayor's appointment of a bi-racial committee as ""heartwarming." Furthermore, Ms. McDonald notifies Mrs. Hamilton that Dr. King is unable to commit to a date to come and speak in Goldsboro.

Letter from Hadley Executive Committee to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Director of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests Dr. King's participation in the Hadley Memorial Fund lecture.

Letter from Juanita to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Chicago, IL

Juanita offers praise and gratitude to Dr. King for his assistance regarding some imprisoned associates. Juanita also offers her prayers to Dr. King.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Revised School Desegregation Policies Under Civil Rights Act of 1964

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This document, published by the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, gives revised policies for school desegregation. The list of areas covered includes unequal programs and facilities, desegregation of staff and dismissals.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Whitehead's Doctrine of Freedom

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead’s doctrine of freedom as described in “Science and the Modern World.”

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, FRANCE

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Chester Harness to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1967
Arizona (AZ)

Chester Harness expresses to Dr. King his interest of being an honorary member of SCLC. He explains that due to the Vietnam War he can not make a financial contribution but he would like to contribute by participating in the Poor People's Campaign of 1968.

Excerpts of Letters Written About Vietnam War

VIETNAM

This document includes excerpts from letters written by Mary Agnes Blonien, sister of an American nurse at the Minh Quy Hospital at Kontum, South Vietnam. Moved to the point of tears, the nurse shares her thoughts and gives a vivid account of the war conditions in Vietnam, and expresses empathy for both Americans and Vietnamese.

Washington D. C. Star: Negro Lawyer Pushing Town Incorporation Plan

Thursday, October 5, 1967

Congressman John Conyers shares an article with civil rights attorney, Orzell Billingsley. The article highlights Attorney Billingsley's efforts to join 20 predominately black municipalities, so that more African Americans can have a voice within politics and economic development.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Letter from Levi Eshkol to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967
ISRAEL, JORDAN

Levi Eshkol, the Prime Minster of Jerusalem, welcomes Dr. King to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964
JAPAN

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Letter from John Whyte to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966
New York (NY)

John Whyte, an eighth grader, describes his class's fundraising efforts for the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Nina C. Brown

Wednesday, January 13, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald provides Nina C. Brown with details about Dr. King's upcoming appearance at Pennsylvania State University.

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Letter from Samuel Kirk to President Johnson

Friday, December 30, 1966
Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Mr. Kirk, Director of the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, writes to President Johnson expressing his desire for peace in Vietnam. Kirk suggests that Johnson appoint a Peace Commission consisting of Dr. King and others to help create solutions for ending the war.

Southern Leaders Conference letter to Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957
Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

Ministers meeting at the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration co-signed this letter to Pres. Eisenhower.

Letter to Eugene Exman from D. McDonald Referencing an Enclosure

Wednesday, September 5, 1962
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, sent this correspondence to Eugene Exman, regarding the enclosure of a letter by Dr. King to Melvin Arnold.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959
Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL)

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Letter to MLK from Marie King

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
Washington (WA)

Marie King writes to express her support for Dr. King.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, South Africa, ISRAEL

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.