The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:


This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.


Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Letter from Margaret Horack to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968
Rhode Island (RI), Atlanta, GA

The Student Government of Salve Regina College requests campaign materials from Dr. King for its participation in "Choice 68," a mock national collegiate presidential primary.

Letter from Frank Van Leemput to MLK

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Frank Ban Leemput, a high school student from Belgium, requests Dr. King provide signatures for the enclosed photos. Mr. Leemput is creating a biography of Dr. King and is in admiration of his political activism as well as achievements in the field of desegregation.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, New York (NY), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Little Rock, AR, Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS), Ohio (OH), CHINA, PHILIPPINES, THAILAND, MALAYSIA, CUBA

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Jim Kelber to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Due to Dr. King's candidacy in the Choice '68 Presidential Primary College Ballot, the Chaffey College requests Dr. King to speak to the student body. Jim Kelber, campus coordinator of Choice '68, informs Dr. King of the campus location and the press coverage he would be susceptible to receive.

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

Letter From MLK to Eugene Exman

Friday, March 9, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King, in this correspondence to Dr. Eugene Exman, expressed his joy in finding out that his book was selected, out of 500, to be presented to President John Kennedy. Dr. King, furthermore, apologized for a continued delay in finishing a manuscript of sermons for a second book. Dr. King's sermons would be converted into his second publication, "Strength to Love."

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 7, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King concerning an invitation to speak from the University Settlement.

Letter from Miles W. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967
Washington (WA)

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Pacific Northwest Conference invites Dr. King to speak at the 1968 conference dinner. The conference will be held at the Methodist Church and will present civil rights spokesman Bishop Everett W. Palmer.

Telegram Invitation from President Johnson to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Mr. Alexander sends this informal invitation to Dr. King requesting that he visits with the President of the United States.

Telegram from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
NIGERIA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mr. Brown confirms the departure date for the Nigeria Peace Mission with Dr. King.


Dr. King cites Psalms 17:15, surmising that the vision of God is a mystical union with God.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Letter from Richard Todd to Reverend Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

Richard Todd writes to Reverend Abernathy to provide and informative article regarding media personality and Yale University professor Dr. Albert E. Burke.

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Indiana (IN), Washington, D.C., Berlin, Germany, SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.


In this series of ten notecards, Dr. King breaks down the Book of Jeremiah into mutiple sections, including chapters and versus regarding Good, knowledge, sin, and forgiveness.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on State of the Union Address

Wednesday, January 12, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King praises President Johnson for his State of the Union address. King expresses appreciation for Johnson's continued commitment to the Great Society, his call for legislation to protect those pursuing their constitutional rights and his pledge to work diligently to end the Vietnam War.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
New York (NY)

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
New York, NY, BRAZIL

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Letter from C. Elden to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

C. Elden urges Dr. King to speak with Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, about his refusal to be drafted into the military. Elden believes that Dr. King's influence will change Clay's mind and make Clay realize that citizens "must fight."

Letter from Deacon Willie McClinek to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Deacon Willie McClinek invites Dr. King, on behalf of the Sensational Heavenly Dew Drops and The Stars of Faith gospel singers, to make an appearance at their play entitled "Master, I Want To Live" in Philadelphia.

Letter from Alex Pascal to MLK

California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Pascal states that the American people are ignorant to the facts of Vietnam. He praises a recent speech by Dr. King on the subject, and he requests a copy of it.

Survey from Jack Hillhouse to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Mass Communications Media

Indiana (IN)

This incomplete survey form is from a graduate student, Jack Hillhouse, seeking to understand the connection, if any, between mass communications media and race riots, demonstrations, and disturbances.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Mathias of Maryland thanks Dr. King for his recent letter urging him to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. Although Mathias' vote against the seating was defeated, he states that the mere challenge to it "has drawn once again the attention of the American public to this unfortunate situation."

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Oklahoma (OK), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.


Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.