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Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958
MEXICO

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Letter from Harley Lappin to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Public Affairs Committee of Winters College at York University in Ontario invites Dr. King to participate in a discussion to raise student awareness of current political issues.

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her meeting, in Germany, with publishers before the Frankfurt Bookfair.

Telegram from George Romney to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967

George Romney telegrams Dr. King to inform him of his inability to attend a conference.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Fielder

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA)

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Dr. Fielder for sending two poems and reminds him of the necessity of seeking peace through non-violence.

Letter from Smithsonian Institution to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965
Washington, D.C.

S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, invites Dr. King to attend the bicentennial birthday celebration of the organization's founder, James Smithson.

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967
Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, THAILAND

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from John Harrigan Jr. to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

John Harrigan, Jr. describes his education and work experience to Dr. King, and explains his desire to transition to the social revolutionary movement. He offers his services to Dr. King, stating his reimbursement requirements. He ends his letter by outlining a four step process to solve poverty in the United States.

Letter from MLK to High School Students

Dr. King writes some high school students to inform them of his inability to attend their graduation. He also offers some words of encouragement.

Letter from Lillian Smith to MLK

Thursday, July 7, 1966
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, SOUTH AFRICA

Lillian Smith, author of 'Strange Fruit,' writes Dr. King to tell of her current health condition. During this time Ms. Smith was battling breast cancer, and was hopeful she would recover. Smith requests Dr. King to visit upon her return home to Clayton County.

Higher Education Opportunities for Southern Negroes

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Boston, MA, Virginia (VA), Texas (TX), Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

The Southern Education Foundation provides a detailed list of references concerning various opportunities, organizations and procedures related to higher education. This pamphlet was strategically designed to assist organizations and community leaders seeking to improve educational opportunities for students of color.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

War (Just War)

Dr. King cites Francisco Suarez's definition of a "just war" from his "Tractibus de. Legibus."

Letter from MLK to Stewart Udall

Thursday, February 22, 1962
Washington, D.C.

On behalf of the SCLC and affiliated organizations, Dr. King requests permission from Stewart Udall, United States Secretary of the Interior, to use the Lincoln Memorial for a Service of Dedication to celebrate the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Robert Greene's Resolutions

Thursday, February 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Robert Greene, of Puerto Rican and African American ancestry, resolves to censure the State of New York. He lists a plethora of racist activities and "Orwellian deceptions" as causes.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Chapter 1 - Introduction

Vermont (VT)

In this dissertation, Dr. King discusses several investigations and problems. He centers the paper around a comparison of "the conceptions of God in the thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Greetings from The English Family on Thanksgiving Day

This greeting letter was written to Dr.King from the English Family. In it they expressed their appreciation to Dr.King and wished him a Happy Thanksgiving. The English Family also offered their congratulations to Dr.King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.

Letter from Glenn E. Smiley to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Smiley requests an endorsement from Dr. King on the creation of a non-violent training film by The Fellowship of Reconciliation.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King praises Senator Kennedy's efforts toward abolishing the poll tax in state elections.

Letter to MLK from Stewart Meacham

Thursday, March 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Nashville, TN, Missouri (MO)

Stewart Meacham writes Dr. King about his availability to attend a conference hosted by the American Friends Service Committee at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He mentions the theme of the ocnference, other invited guests, and that the orgranization is prepared to cover Dr. King's travel and housing expenses.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Missouri (MO)

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

Letter from George W. Baker to MLK

George W. Baker encloses a check in support of Dr. King and his ongoing work towards peace in Vietnam.