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Statement by MLK on Jailings

Thursday, May 9, 1963

Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Financial Statement for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Friday, April 8, 1955

The Financial Committee at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church details the budget and contributions for October 1955 through March 1956.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Thursday, January 17, 1963

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Robert V. Doehne to MLK

Saturday, June 11, 1966

Robert V. Doehne informs Dr. King of the great debates held by the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University. William Buckley Jr. and Norman Thomas served as two controversial contestants in a past debate that received media coverage. Mr. Doehne requests Dr. King visit the campus and engage in the debate of this year.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Philosophy of Life (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes G. K. Chesterton’s “Heretics.”

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.

Letter from Moe Foner to a Friend

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Moe Foner is writing in regards to a new publication called, "Labor Voice For Peace." The issue mentioned covers the conference of labor leaders held in Chicago. Foner also asked for any comments concerning the publication.

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

Article Regarding New Head Start Project

Head Start is Shifted to College and Politics Behind OEO's Cutoffs.The two articles depicted provide details on the relationship between the Office of Economic Opportunity and the funds being cut off from the Child Development Group to be given to a small Mississippi college.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

Notes on Generational Questions

The document, shown here, was briefly handwritten by Dr. King. Some of the writing in the document says, "One of the most important questions raised in any generation is the question.........." The remaining content of the document is unwritten.

The Urban Coalition National Coordinator's Weekly Report

Friday, February 9, 1968

In the Urban Coalition's weekly report, the National Coordinator notifies members of the events that had occurred within the past week. The report covers local coalitions, legislation, private employment, and the steering committee.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Dunbar

Monday, August 22, 1966

Dr. King writes to Dr. Leslie Dunbar to assure her that the SCLC was indeed ready and able to administer CEP Grant Funds for that school year.

Request for Help

Monday, November 6, 1967

Marcellus M. Harper requests assistance from Dr. King in relation to economic improvement. In his letter of appeal, Mr. Harper requests that Dr. King speaks on gossip, unity, improving conditions and ways of living, and economic improvement.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

To Set Our People Free

This poem by Mrs. Eudora V. Savage is dedicated to the African American veterans of World War Two.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Dieter Pichowski to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Mr. Pichowski, from East Germany, is in request of Dr. King's handwriting.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Letter from Lucille D. Anderson to MLK inviting him to Philadelphia

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King's presence is requested by Lucille Anderson in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Robert Friedman to MLK Regarding "The Forensic Quarterly"

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Robert Friedman informs Dr. King that manpower needs and compulsory service systems will be the topics of national discussion in high schools of the nation. Friedman asks King to contribute an article stating his view on the problem area for publication in "The Forensic Quarterly".

Letter from Thomas R. Hughes to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Thomas R. Hughes, Executive Assistant to the Secretary of Agriculture, sends Dr. King Orville Freeman's Senate testimony on the Department's efforts to improve nutrition for low-income families and provide food assistance throughout the country.