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"ISRAEL"

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Poems Entitled "Black Power," "Beyond Anger," and "Sins Of The Father"

In this document, there are three poems: "Black Power", "Beyond Anger" and "Sins Of The Father".

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS)

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bouwman

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
NETHERLANDS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Madame Bouwman for the enjoyable interview conducted in Holland. Dr. King states he will be returning to Holland in July of 1966 and would be interested in meeting again.

Soul

Dr. King quotes Ephesus of Heraclitus' thoughts on soul.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Benjamin Brown

Thursday, October 14, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dora McDonald responds to Benjamin Brown of CORE on behalf of Dr. King. She tells Mr. Brown of Dr. King's travels and urges him to pick up a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" in order to find a fitting quote to publish in the "CORE Guide."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 14, 1964
New York, NY

This letter references the enclosure of a check as an advance for the German edition of "Strength to Love".

MLK Writes to Mrs. King from Jail

Tuesday, October 25, 1960
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes this letter to Coretta Scott King after recently being transferred to a state prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He expresses understanding of how the present circumstances are difficult for his family, particularly given Coretta's pregnancy with their third child, Dexter Scott King. King goes on to encourage Coretta to maintain strength and says that their excessive suffering will serve the greater purpose of freedom. He asks her to come visit him and requests that she bring several books, a collection of sermons and a radio.

Invitation from Susan Rowland to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Susan Rowland invites Dr. King to the University of Western Ontario to give an address during the spring of 1968. During his visit he is expected to speak on the topics of civil rights and the Vietnam conflict. Although these are the areas of focus, Ms. Rowland explains that the exact nature of the talk is up to Dr. King's discretion.

Letter from The Charlotte News to MLK

Monday, January 3, 1966
North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN)

George Willhite, of The Charlotte News, asks Dr. King to comment on accusations of him being a communist. A reader had seen a photo of Dr. King at an allegedly communist school in Tennessee. Willhite asks Dr. King to explain the circumstances of the picture.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. The document outlines developments that occurred in pursuits such as voter registration and Operation Breadbasket. The piece concludes with commentary on the future of the organization, specifically "deeper involvement in political action."

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960
Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter to MLK from Ms. Eleanor Fischer

Monday, November 13, 1961
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Ms. Fischer writes to confirm a conference meeting, for an interview with Dr. King. She requests his presence at an informal dinner to discuss details about the program, for which his interview will be taped. Finally, she concludes by extending formalities to Dr. King's family and conveys her interests in interviewing them as well.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Cognition

This note card discusses cognition in relation to the context of events.

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Chicago, IL

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA)

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Letters from Ambassadors

JORDAN, ISRAEL

Dr. King notes the letters that he has received from several Ambassadors. He also notes the confirmed appointments with the Ambassadors.

Progress Report from Robert L. Green to SCLC Staff

Tuesday, September 12, 1967
Virginia (VA), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), New York, NY, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Berkeley, CA

Mr. Green sends this report to the SCLC staff concerning the Chicago Adult Education Project (CAEP). He writes of the problems and difficulties concerning black communities such as Lawndale, Illinois. He then goes on to describe what the major objective is and how the CAEP can help communities, like those in Lawndale. He proposes "to develop basic, needed educational tools to improve reading, writing, consumer and personal budget skills, and to provide the project with job-seeking skills."

Correspondence - Contribution Thank-You Letter from MLK to Chris Folcker 8/16/66

Tuesday, August 16, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden

In this document Dr. King expresses great appreciation for the Swedish Consul General's donation of $100,000. The amount of this contribution would underscore that Sweden's commitment to Dr. King's work and the civil rights movement in general did not stop at the proverbial edge of the Nobel Peace Prize's water.

Letter from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King urges Attorney General Kennedy to act on behalf of the Negro citizens in LeFlore County who are being attacked for working in voter registration or becoming registered voters.

SCLC Audit Notice

Tuesday, December 19, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Rutherford writes to inform Citizens Trust Company that there will be an audit of the SCLC. Rutherford requests that the bank send a list of any and all accounts associated with SCLC.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Letter to MLK from Raymond Brown

Sunday, December 10, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Raymond Brown writes to Dr. King admonishing him for his affiliations with Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael and hopes that these associations are temporary.

Letter from John A. Collison to MLK

Saturday, August 15, 1964
California (CA), New York (NY)

John Collision writes Dr. King regarding race relations in America. Collision wants Dr. King to understand that majority of whites have no hatred toward blacks, but instead "a strangeness" and questioning of why people are different shades.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Saturday, February 26, 1966
Chicago, IL

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

Monday, September 24, 1962
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

President Kennedy compliments Dr. King and his organization for their persistent push for equal rights in America.