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"ISRAEL"

Letter from Mary Ann Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mary Ann Johnson of Boston thanks Dr. King for taking a stand against the bombing in Vietnam. Johnson stresses that funds supplied for the war cripples the wages of working people in America.

Judgment

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Executive Director's Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

William A. Rutherford sends an informal report to the SCLC Executive Board in Washington, D.C. This is Rutherford's first report as an administrator of the organization and it purposes the ways in which the SCLC can better utilize, and apply, their resources.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

Judgement or Justice

Dr. King quotes a book entitled "Sea Dreams," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, regarding judgement and justice.

Letter from Gunter Kohlhaw to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. Gunter B. Kohlhaw shares the memorable experience of hearing Dr. King deliver a sermon while attending Sunday service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Kohlhaw also requests copies of Dr. King's collection of sermons.

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

The Man Who Was a Fool

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

Letter from Irmgard Svenson

Monday, August 14, 1967

Irmgard Svenson requests that Dr. King send copies of his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967

Maurice A. Dawkins is requesting Dr. King to attend an infomal meeting, along with other civil rights leaders, to discuss the War on Proverty in the South.

Letter to MLK from Danish Tidens Stemme Editor Hans Jensen

Mr. Jensen, editor of the periodical "Tidens Stemme," asks Dr. King to write an article on the current state of Blacks in America for their January issue.

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Canon L. John Collins

Friday, January 3, 1969

Mrs. King confirms with Canon L. John Collins the dates of her visit to England.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.

5th Company Gives in to Breadbasket Demands for Jobs

The author writes about how operation breadbasket completed successful negotiations for new jobs for Negroes within the Chicago dairy industry.

National-Zeitung Questionnaire

The National-Zeitung of Switzerland asks questions surrounding the current international issues of peace and the Vietnam War.

War

Dr. King cites a quote concerning "war" from Oswald Spengler's "The Return of the Caesars," an article featured in The American Mercury.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

This pamphlet provides information regarding the history, purpose and plans for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace.

Letter from Joe Cheru to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Joe Cheru advises Dr. King to adopt a technique called "organized massive write-in." Using this method, he suggested that Dr. King could channel greater support from people who could not participate directly by being physically present for demonstrations.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 22, 1963

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Ave Maria National Catholic Weekly: A Voice for Harlem

Monday, July 31, 1967

Dan Griffin forwards this letter to Dr. King with an enclosure of a magazine from Ave Marie, entitled "A Voice for Harlem." The magazine includes several topics such as hunger in the United States, the War in Vietnam, and worship in the Soviet Union.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Letter from Perceel Lanfair to MLK

Perceel Lanfair informs Dr. King that she and her husband are looking for a larger apartment.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

Rodney Clurman requests that Dr. King attend a ten-day trip supporting various people and organizations.

Letter from Floyd Haynes to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Floyd Haynes, Editor of the black-owned "Buckeye Review," invites Dr. King to speak at a civic forum. The event is a joint effort of the newspaper and the Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship of Youngstown, Ohio. Haynes also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.