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What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives this letter from U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding his testimony outlining his position on civil rights before the House Judiciary Committee.

Letter from Hal Mason to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

Hal Mason, campaign chairman for Choice "68, requests that Dr. King send any materials pertaining to Dr. King's potential candidacy.

Letter from Ossie Davis to MLK Regarding Malcolm X Assassination

Friday, October 1, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter, Ossie Davis asserts to Dr. King that it is true that there is one law for whites and another for blacks. Ossie continues by expressing his feelings on Malcolm X's assassination. He closes his letter by asking for Dr. King's signature and monetary donation for an ad.

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966
New York, NY, Chicago, IL

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Race Prejudice"

Here in this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on Race Prejudice and the "evil" it entails.

Letter from William Welsh to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

William Welsh objects to Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) rejection to enter the draft for the Vietnam War. Mr. Welsh asks that if Dr. King agrees with this notion, he should denounce Mr. Clay publicly.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi S. Burr Yampol

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rabbi Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, for sending a copy of his organization's resolution.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Letter from J.Campe to MLK regarding Book Royalties

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York, NY

This financial document references earnings from the Japanese editions of Dr. King's books, "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Why We Can't Wait."

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Moral Absolutism"

Dr. King drafted this handwritten outline entitled "Moral Absolutism." The focus is on judgement and its relation to both good and evil.

Letter to Robert F. Kennedy from Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 4, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald writes Senator Kennedy to inform him that his recent letter to Dr. King came in his absence. She states that the letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return to the Atlanta office.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Thursday, July 30, 1964
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL)

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Albany, GA

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966
Tuskegee, AL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

Letter from Harold Franklin to MLK

Saturday, May 2, 1964
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Harold Franklin expresses appreciation to Dr. King for granting him scholarship aid.

Letter from Benjamin Conklin to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Conklin writes this letter urging Rev. Abernathy to rethink the decision to proceed with the Peoples March on Washington. He is concerned that with the recent assassination of Dr. King this action will only alienate Congress and the American public. Hence the march could cause more bloodshed.

Letter from Ethel Harvey to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Ethel Harvey writes to Dr. King regarding her desire to support the Civil Rights Movement. She then expresses her ideas towards resolving tension between whites and black relations.

Letter from Thelma Berlack Boozer to MLK

Tuesday, May 24, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Thelma Berlack Boozer, President of Les Seize Club, Inc. writes Dr. King expressing that her club "continues to believe in the aims of the SCLC," and encloses a monetary contribution.

Letter from Resident of Dade County, Florida to MLK

King, Martin Luther, Jr., Florida (FL)

An anonymous writer requests Dr. King's assistance for youth in the Juvenile Court System of Dade County, Florida.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, November 4, 1966
New York, NY

This cable from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earned value of British royalties and the number of copies sold for "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Strength to Love."

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Letter from MLK to Rev. and Mrs. Gardiner Day

Thursday, July 30, 1964
Cambridge, MA

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. and Mrs. Day for their contribution to the SCLC. He expresses delight in knowing that the Days' donation will help to empower employment initiatives and voting rights programs in the United States. The letter was written in the weeks following the signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Letter from Ludovic Luke Barrie to MLK Regarding World Bible Society

In this letter, Ludovic Luke Barrie grants Dr. King the title “Honary President of The World Bible Society, Inc.” for all of his accomplishments.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK)

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

Bayard Rustin: Goals and Strategies

Thursday, August 20, 1964
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Maine (ME)

In this speech, given before Bowdoin College in 1964, Bayard Rustin outlines the basis of civil rights issues currently being fought for. He argues that man must come together as one and face the problem with our society, and that African Americans see the problems with society more than other races because they are struggling to bring civil rights and social change to all.

SCLC and The American Foundation on Nonviolence: Proposal for Housing

Alabama (AL)

The American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC set forth a proposal for low cost self-help housing in Greene County, Alabama.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Regarding Tax Forms

Tuesday, November 15, 1966
New York, NY, GERMANY

Joan Daves forwards a set of tax forms related to the German edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".