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Letter from Senator Clifford P. Case to MLK Regarding Poll Taxes as a Condition to Vote

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

New Jersey Senator Clifford Case informs Dr. King that he feels strongly about the elimination of poll taxes as a condition to vote, and he will do his best to push through a provision abolishing these taxes.

Letter from Frederick K. Arrington to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Frederick Arrington of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church writes Dr. King on behalf of the male Ushers asking his permission to use a photo of Dr. King on key tags for a fundraiser.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes a scripture from the Old Testament book of Job regarding immortality and the "affirmation of the mortality of man."

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes St. Irenaeus of Lyons.

African American Unity in Atlanta, Georgia

The author of this document discusses why it is imperative for African Americans to not only stand in unity against the injustices of society, but to also be informed about the issues in which they strive to prevail against. Information about school integration, housing discrimination, and taxation is offered in the conclusion of the document.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

Sunday, August 5, 1962

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Sargent Shriver, Director for the Office of Economic Opportunity, regretfully informs Dr. King that he will not be able to meet with SCLC's delegates in Birmingham for their convention.

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Letter from John A. Bodkin to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

John Bodkin writes Dr. King regarding the speech Dr. King delivered at Riverside Baptist Church in New York detailing his views on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Bob Abel to MLK

In this letter Bob Abel encloses a contribution from a friend in England to Dr. King while also commenting on Vietnam and the link to Civil Rights.

Letter from Richard W. Boone

Saturday, October 29, 1966

The Child Development Group of Mississippi is being terminated by the Office of Economic Opportunity. This is not because the program isn't valid but because it would disturb the balance of politics in Mississippi. Klein and Saks, Inc. has helped keep the program alive. The goal of the program was to provide education, medical assistance, and nourishment for preschool children and their families.

Sermon Outline Notes - MLK

This document is an outline handwritten by Dr. King, who frequently wrote such outlines as a precursor to a sermon. The topic centers on man's talent and his reasons for using--or more importantly, not using--that talent.

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Our God is Able

Sunday, January 4, 1953

Reverend Frederick M. Meek retells a story in the New Testament about a civilization and their journey to discover that God is able.

Letter from C.B. Atkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962

In this document the writer thanks Dr. King for meeting with him concerning the proposed "Martin King album" and television series. The writer encloses a memorandum on consumer information and requests King's travel schedule.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."

Letter from Jitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Jitsuo Morikawa, Secretary for Evangelism at the American Baptist Jubilee Advance, asks Dr. King to address the organization's Evangelism Luncheon in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves' Office to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This letter from Ms. Daves' office to Dr. King is a breakdown of various foreign rights royalties to "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos Or Community?".

SCLC News Bulletin

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude for the "Palais des Sports" event in Paris, France which brought support financially for the movement. Dr. King stress the duality between France and America in the "total struggle."

Memorandum to Files

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

What Is Man?

This is one of several documents where Dr. King explores the nature of "man." He considers the question "what is man?" to be a timeless concept that "confronts any generation." Dr. King's analysis incorporates Biblical and Shakespearean texts, among other notable references.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.