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"ISRAEL"

Wellesley class of 1966 letter to Dr.King

Wednesday, January 26, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Wellesley College class of 1966 asks Dr.King to become an honorable member of their class.

Observer: The Fiery Savior

Kentucky (KY), VIETNAM

Journalist Ponchitta Pierce sends Dr. King an article that details the press conference of "The Militant." In response to questioning, the individual expresses their discontent with liberal politics, the United States of America, and its presence in Vietnam.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Monday, May 16, 1966
Virginia (VA)

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of updates regarding the advertisement of "Why We Can't Wait". Joan Daves also discusses a conversation they previously had on the phone and gives an explanation of her actions.

"Ideal Traits"

SWEDEN

In this article, the author confronts Dr. King's statement regarding Scandinavian countries. The author suggests that Dr. King does not have a full understanding of the culture and proceeds to enlighten him.

Inter-Office Telephone Extensions

Documented are the telephone extensions for the SCLC office staff.

MLK's Speech Notes

FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Tuesday, January 25, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967
Florida (FL), New York, NY

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, ITALY

Rodney Clurman writes to Dr. King concerning recent updates with regard to political and social agendas. He concludes by requesting a wire transfer to his current location in New York City.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Arthur W. Jordan

Friday, February 24, 1967
Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Arthur Jordan for a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The Weaknesses of Liberal Theology

In this paper from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King discusses his thoughts regarding liberal theology, which he thinks is the most logical theology that exists. There are weaknesses, however, one being that it often loses itself in higher criticism.

Letter from Student Michael Chernoby to MLK

Saturday, May 1, 1965
Michigan (MI), Selma, AL

Michael Chernoby, a student at West Catholic High School, offers his support to Dr. King and the movement by choosing social work as a profession. According to Chernoby, "If I can do only a fraction of the good that you have done for mankind I will consider myself a success."

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964
Washington (WA)

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Socorro Santos

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Revelation as a Way of Knowing

Dr. King quotes and discusses Henry Nelson Wieman’s view of revelation and knowledge as described in “The Source of Human Good.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

Unwise and Untimely?

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New Mexico (NM), Iowa (IA), INDIA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter, dated October 5, 1966, J. Campe encloses royalty payments for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," "Why We Can't Wait", and "Strength to Love."

Letter to MLK from Rose Spann

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Montgomery, AL

Rosa Spann of West Kinney Jr. High School, expresses her appreciation to Dr. King by writing a poem called "The Undergrounders."

God

Dr. King cites and comments on a passage from I Chronicles about the gods that are idols.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

Letter from Governor Philip H. Hoff to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
New York, NY, Vermont (VT)

In this letter, Vermont Governor Philip H. Hoff expresses his gratitude for the autographed book that Dr. King sent to him.

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965
Minnesota (MN)

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965
New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA

Martha Kennedy thanks Dr. King for sending her a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Kennedy feels that Dr. King's leadership is well emphasized in the context of the book. Particularly, she finds the chapter on Black Power to be "valuable." Mrs. Kennedy hopes for much success to Dr. King and his great work.