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Letter from Adele Fishman to MLK

Monday, August 31, 1964

The American Book Company is requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail." They hope to include the letter, in a text book, entitled THE STREAM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, THIRD Edition. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

A Statement by Dr. King

Sunday, July 17, 1966

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

United States Commission on Civil Rights Information Bulletin

Monday, February 1, 1965

This information bulletin published by the US Commission on Civil Rights provides updates of current activities. The bulletin includes information regarding voting rights hearings, education in the south, and news from private organizations like CORE, NAACP and the Council for Civil Unity.

Letter from Charles Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Charles Williams thanks Dr. King for sending him an autograph.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

God

These notes highlight various conceptions of 'God' as revealed through Dr. King's scholarship.

Invitation to MLK from London Methodist Youth Organization

Monday, May 15, 1967

Greater London Youth and Community Service invites Dr. King to participate in a London to Canterbury Pilgrimage by leading a study on human rights and the church and preaching a sermon.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Final Plans for the Washington Poor People's Campaign

This document outlines the dates, times, places and events that will take place in preparation for the Washington Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Walter Martin to SCLC Officials

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Walter Martin of the American Friends Service Committee, writes to numerous SCLC officials concerning Quaker work in Southern Africa.

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

World

Dr. King discusses Paul Tillich's definition of the world as a "unity of manifoldness" in "Systematic Theology."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Solomon Mendelson

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

In this response letter to Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom in New York, Miss McDonald explains that Dr. King will make all efforts to attend the "I Have a Dream" musical performance.

Letter from MLK to Marguerite Priolean

Sunday, October 6, 1963

Dr. King is invited to speak at Cheyney State College in Pennsylvania by Mrs. Marquerite Priolean. However, Dr. King must deny the request due to the excessive amount of speaking engagements already placed on his calendar.

MLK's Interfaith Conference on Civil Rights Statement

Tuesday, January 15, 1963

Dr. King shares the significance of three major religious faiths of America, discussing the moral issues affiliated with segregation and the importance of the religious institutitions' influence.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King shares his contentment with the company of Pastor Charles Westphal and the rest of the French Protestant Federation.

Letter from MLK to William A. Rutherford

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Dr. King encourages Mr. Rutherford that he would be a great asset to the S.C.L.C. and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter to Baron Allard from Mrs. King

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Mrs. King writes to Baron Allard to thank him for the time she spent in Belgium. She thanks him for the gifts he sent for her loved ones and extends an invitation to visit when he travels to Atlanta.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Gladys Foreman

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald thanks Ms. Gladys Foreman for her contribution of stamps.

Letter from American Friends Service Committee to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

R. Ogden Hannaford and Kale A. Williams, representatives of the American Friends Service Committee, enclose a pre-publication edition of a book aimed at peacefully resolving the issues in Vietnam.

Letter from Gerald H. Anderson to MLK

Friday, April 10, 1964

Gerald Anderson, the Academic Dean at Union Theolgical Seminary, writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to a volume of sermons for publishing.