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Letter from Mrs. Thomas Walsh to Dr. Roy Enquist

Monday, June 5, 1967
Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Thomas Walsh writes to Dr. Roy J. Enquist regarding an invitation for Dr. King to speak at St. Mary's University, St. Edward's University and the Texas Lutheran College.

1964 Election


Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

MLK's Sermon Outline

Dr. King categorizes different types of Christians.

Telegram from MLK to Muhammad Ali

Nevada (NV)

Dr. King sends a supportive telegram to Muhammad Ali. test

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Letter from P. Charles to MLK

Friday, November 6, 1964

P. Charles, President of the Hyderabad Lutheran Church in India, writes Dr. King to commend him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and also to congratulate him on the landslide election victory of President Lyndon Johnson.

Letter from Darlene Wentz to MLK

Wednesday, March 14, 1962
North Dakota (ND), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Darlene Wentz, a Senior at Streeter High School, request pamphlets on the social and economic conditions of African Americans.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Virginia (VA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Telegram from Planned Parenthood to MLK

Saturday, June 11, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Medora Bass, Planned Parenthood President, asks Dr. King for a response to an invitation to speak at the organization's upcoming annual luncheon.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965
INDIA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy expresses appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to give an oral history interview for the JFK Library.

Letter from MLK to Robert L. Pino

Thursday, November 29, 1962
New York (NY), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King writes to newly appointed Chairman of the Civil Rights Committee of New York Local Union 2603, Robert Pino, regarding the first anniversary of the Albany Movement.

Letter from MLK to Frank Church

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Frank Church, a United States Senator from Idaho, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Knox, John

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on John Knox.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
Memphis, TN

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.


Dr. King writes a quote from Genevan philosopher, Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

National Sharecroppers Fund Annual Report

Frank P. Graham, chairman of the National Sharecropper's Fund, mails out two separate articles from The New York Times and The New York Post that referencing the organization which supports migrant farm workers. Graham provides factual information pertaining to the proposed legislation to improve living standards for farm workers, and communicates the need for such a proposal.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Maynard Gertler, of Harvest House Limited Publishers, informs Dr. King that he was able to obtain a copy of one of his speeches and his correct mailing address.

Letter to Mrs. King from Rev. and Mrs. Joseph L. Roberts

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Detroit, MI

In this heartfelt correspondence to Mrs. King, Rev. Joseph Roberts, President Elder of the West Detroit District for the AME Church, expressed sympathy for the death of Dr. King. In the letter, he acknowledges the enclosure of the hard copy of his spoken tribute to Dr. King. Seven years later, in 1975, Rev. Roberts would succeed Rev. Martin Luther King, Sr., as the fourth pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Woodrow T. Hughes to MLK

Monday, April 18, 1966
Missouri (MO), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This letter from Woodrow Hughes and Norman Seay of the Kinloch Gateway Center invites Dr. King to speak at their Second Annual City Wide Workshop. The letter refers to an enclosure with basic information about the city of Kinloch, Missouri. Kinloch is one of the largest all-black cities in the United States

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
California (CA)

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967
New Orleans, LA

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.

Letter to Mr. Wilkinson from Dr. Schrade

Monday, May 3, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), INDIA, London, England

Dr. Schrade asks Mr. Wilkinson in the NAACP office in New York to pass on a request for Dr. King to write an article for his magazine. Previous Nobel Prize winners have submitted an autograph photo and a short biography to the magazine. In additional to the requested article, Dr. Schrade hopes Dr. King will do the same.

Anonymous Letter to MLK


The author suggests that Dr. King focus on six specific things to accomplish in 1968.

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1960
North Carolina (NC)

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Vote No on State Question 409 – Oklahoma NAACP

Oklahoma (OK)

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders state their opinions regarding ballot question 409, the "right to work" law. All of the civil rights leaders encourage Negro readers to vote against passing his law because it will not benefit the Negro worker.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."