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Letter from Rodney Armanie to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Rodney Armanie writes to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Class Notes: Deuteronomy

Dr. King discusses the theological concepts of God, man, sin, individual ethics, and social ethics. He also outlines the history of the Biblical book, Deuteronomy.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Hicks to MLK

Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Mary Hicks sends a monetary donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was sent after Mr. Hicks consulted with author Mrs. Boyle about where a donation could be used.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.


Dr. King quotes Charles Darwin's "The Origin of Species."

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964
Georgia (GA)

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Sargent Shriver, Director for the Office of Economic Opportunity, regretfully informs Dr. King that he will not be able to meet with SCLC's delegates in Birmingham for their convention.

Letter from Ted Bleecker to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ted Bleecker, Director of Publications for the United Federation of Teachers, extends gratitude to Dr. King for his statement in the Federation's 50th anniversary issue. Enclosed is a copy of the issue in which Dr. King congratulates the Federation, draws comparisons between the attitudes of the Federation and the Civil Rights Movement, and thanks them for receipt of the John Dewey Award.

Letter from David Puckett to MLK

Saturday, September 3, 1966
Chicago, IL

David Puckett writes Dr. King on behalf of the poor whites in the Uptown area of Chicago. Puckett asks Dr. King to support the upcoming rally and march, where they will demand the release of Sam Joseph O'Donnell and protest against the police.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

William Kivi warns Dr. King that Senator Edward Brooke is a danger to the progress made as a result of the civil rights movement. Sen. Brooke alleges that Dr. King caused major harm to the movement once he chose to speak out against the Vietnam War. In Kivi's view of Brooke and his policies, "He reasons like a true Republican-out to feather his own nest at the expense of the entire negro race-worldwide."

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL)

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Walter Simcich to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Walter Simcich invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto, Ontario. He then asks Dr. King to suggest an alternate civil rights speaker if he is unable to attend.

Letter from Joan Daves to Harry H. Wachtel

Friday, November 6, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves sends Mr. Watchel a copy of a proposed Memorandum of Agreement for the distribution of hand lettered copies of Martin Luther King's speech I Have A Dream.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964
New York (NY)

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

Mississippi (MS)

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1967
Oregon (OR), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), California (CA)

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Letter from Congressman John McCormack to MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressional House Speaker John McCormack writes that he is very glad the McCulloch Substitute Bill was rejected by the House of Representatives.


"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

Alabama (AL), SWEDEN, Hawaii (HI), New York (NY)

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Letter from Nancy F. Oakes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Nancy Oakes writes a letter of support to Reverend Ralph Abernathy and wishes him success with the March for the Poor People's Crusade.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
Kentucky (KY)

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Cohen

Friday, August 9, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King offers his appreciation to Leslie Cohen for communicating to him an "honor bestowed... each of Miss Egnal's eighth grade class."

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN)

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

New York, NY

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
VIETNAM, Berkeley, CA

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Charles Simpson to MLK and Chauncey Eskridge

Monday, December 18, 1967
Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, VENEZUELA

Charles G. Simpson provides Dr. King with the financial outline surrounding the Stars for Freedom Reception and the Show at The Spectrum in Philadelphia.

Telegram from Milton Powell to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA

Upon Dr. King's recent arrest, Milton Powell, the executive chairman of CORE, sends his whole-hearted support on behalf of the organization.

Bond and The Constitution


The author of this article argues that the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Horace Julian Bond represents a great injustice. The author asserts that Mr. Bond was refused a seat due to his views on American foreign policy and the issue of race.