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Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

News Release: $30 Billion Omnibus Bill for Jobs, Education and Housing Presented to SCLC Convention

Friday, August 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI, Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI)

This press release is an overview of Congressman John Conyers, Jr.'s "Full Opportunity Act of 1967."

SCLC Newsletter: October 1963

Tuesday, October 1, 1963
HUNGARY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA), South Carolina (SC), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, SOUTH AFRICA, New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), DENMARK, Connecticut (CT), Tallahassee, FL, Orangeburg, SC, Louisville, KY, Brooklyn, NY, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York, NY

This document contains the SCLC's newletter for October 1963. The articles featured in the newsletter include: SCLC's recent accomplishments, details of the Sixteen Street Baptist Church bombing, the seventh annual SCLC convention, data regarding employment for Negroes in Alabama, and gains made in St. Augustine, Florida. Also featured are numerous photographs of Dr. King and notable Civil Rights leaders.

Letter from Mrs. Elizabeth Sherrill to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Sherrill informs Dr. King of a young man, Mr. Jerry Peace, from her church, St. Mark's, who shows great promise as a poet. She encourages Dr. King to reach out to Mr. Peace to help direct his "rather anger energy" into a new direction.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Maurice A. Dawkins is requesting Dr. King to attend an infomal meeting, along with other civil rights leaders, to discuss the War on Proverty in the South.

U.S. Vice Presidential Address

Friday, June 24, 1955
Washington, D.C.

These Excerpts from a Vice Presidential address made on June 24, 1955 boast the claim of moving all Americans closer to achieving the American Dream regardless of race, creed or color. The vice President lists five reasons for the success of the Eisenhower Administration in emproving equal opportunities for all Americans, including Negroes.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

Friday, June 30, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Letter from Reverend V. W. Glanton to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
New York (NY)

Reverend V. W. Glanton encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC after receiving communications about voter registration initiatives in the South.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Montgomery, AL

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

In a Word- Now

Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

This is a draft of the article "In a Word-Now" written by Dr. King. It was published in the New York Times on September 29, 1963.

Letter from Paul Johnson to MLK regarding American Politics

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, Paul Johnson tells Dr. King about how there is a concern about the state of the 1968 elections before soliciting Dr. King's response to a series of questions.

Letter from MLK to Chris Folker of Sweden

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Chris Folcker's support and hospitality during his trip to Sweden. He also shares his satisfaction with the unique reaction of Mr. Folcker's organization.

Telegram from Arnold Aronson to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Arnold Aronson requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights endorsing the anti-poverty bill.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Monday, August 13, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

Letter from R. Terry Taft to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C.

R. Terry Taft expresses his disappointment in reading Dr. King's feelings in Newsweek regarding the failure of the Office of Urban affairs to become a federal cabinet position.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967
Nashville, TN, VIETNAM

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

Nobel Peace Prize Dinner Program

Monday, January 27, 1964
Atlanta, GA

The citizens of Atlanta held a recognition dinner on January 27, 1965 to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize. Tributes were offered by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., AME Bishop Ernest Hickman, Rev. Edward Driscoll of the Georgia Council of Churches, State Senator Leroy Johnson, and Roman Catholic Archbishop Paul Hallinan. Dr. King gave the address.

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
Denver, CO

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

Letter from Moss Kendrix to MLK

Wednesday, February 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, Los Angeles, CA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Kendrix wishes to meet with Dr. King to discuss a certain rumor concerning him and the Coca-Cola Company.

Justice Harlan Concurring

Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC)

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Michigan (MI)

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from J. M. Koelbe to Dr. King

Friday, August 12, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

Mr. Koelbe writes Dr. King about his financial distress. He also tells Dr. King that he admires him for his courage and gives him encouragement for the future.

Letter from Moses Walker to MLK

Saturday, January 30, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King moves his family to Chicago to assist with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Walker writes to Dr. King on behalf of the Republican party of the twenty fourth ward. He thanks Dr. King for choosing the twenty fourth ward as the starting point for his campaign to end slum housing. Mayor Daley eventually negotiated with Dr. King to build better housing and to make mortgages available regardless of race.

SCEF Policy Statement

New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a policy statement on current civil rights and civil liberties issues presented by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. The organization is an educational agency with the purpose of eradicating discrimination among the nation's citizens. This document contains a list of advocacies and condemnations as it relates to federal legislature in favor of civil rights support.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

The Negro Past and It's Challenge for the Future

Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In honor of Negro History Week, Dr. King offers this speech on the black community's past and future in America.