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Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."

Letter from Joan Daves to Harry H. Wachtel

Friday, November 6, 1964

Joan Daves sends Mr. Watchel a copy of a proposed Memorandum of Agreement for the distribution of hand lettered copies of Martin Luther King's speech I Have A Dream.

Letter from Glenn M. Dunkle to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Glenn Dunkle, Senior Planner for the City of Richmond, Virginia, requests a copy of a bill proposed by Dr. King that addresses slums and housing clearance. The bill will be used by the Richmond City Planning Commission as it studies "methods of stimulating urban redevelopment and new low income housing."

Letter from Lilyann Mitchell to MLK

Lilyann Mitchell wrote this letter of support to Dr. King and included a copy of a poem she had written describing him. She writes that it has been published in multiple newspapers.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Emotionalism in Religion

Dr. King records a quote from a book entitled "The Gift of Tongues, A Study in the Pathological Aspects of Christianity".

Letter from MLK to Jimmie Wattson

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King acknowledges his receipt of Jimmie Wattson's letter and expresses his deep concern for Mr. Wattson's imprisonment. Dr. King explains to Mr. Wattson that the SCLC does not have legal staff to handle matters. Dr. King suggests that he write the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

God

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth regarding the nature of God. In addition, Dr. King provides bibliographical information for the quote.

Religion

Dr. King records a quote on religion from William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Letter from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK

Tuesday, October 23, 1962

Dow Kirkpatrick, Pastor of First Methodist Church in Evanston, Illinois, invites Dr. King to dinner during his visit to Evanston.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Letter from MLK to Debbie Steiner

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. King thanks Miss Steiner for her letter and explains how love is the way to overcome the injustices brought on by prejudice and ignorance. He writes that, though it can be difficult, she must direct her thoughts in a loving way towards those who mistreat her.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

Memorandum from William A. Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette to SCLC Staff Members

Thursday, January 4, 1968

William Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette inform the SCLC staff members of an impromptu retreat on the Poor People's Campaign, which will be held at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Thursday, April 5, 1962

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

Letter from MLK to Vera Jones

Thursday, December 2, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Vera Jones for her support of the Freedom Movement and the SCLC.

Letter from Reverend Samuel B. McKinney to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966

Samuel Johnson, President of the SCLC Daytona Beach chapter, writes Dr.King to express his concerns for the current state of the organization. He urges King to make an appearance soon.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Letter from Stanley Levison to MLK

Friday, May 20, 1966

Attorney Stanley Levinson writes Dr. King about the state of the SCLC's finances, and the potential of a financial crisis.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Lamont

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

This document contains a small series of responses between Dr. King and Herbert Lamont. Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lamont's moral support, while Lamont affirms Dr. King's sentiments on peace and justice.

Expenses for Delegates

This detailed list breaks down the travel, registration and room costs for delegates of several Southern states throughout the country.

To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

Man (Cause of Sin)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

The Concordia Lutheran: First Quarter 1968

The Concordia Lutheran Conference distributed a newsletter to aid fellow Lutherans. The purpose was to provide various Bible verses and teachings that could be applied to the reader's life.

Check Distribution for the Crusade for Citizenship Program

Friday, December 31, 1965

Mildred Smith is given a check on behalf of the Crusade for Citizenship program.

Standing By The Best in an Evil Time" E

Sunday, August 6, 1967

In this sermon, Dr. King addresses the evil in the world and suggest to his congregation that they counter this by being strong and steadfast in the Lord. Dr. King also touches on the current issues in society and how to continue the use of nonviolence as means to for peace and social justice.

Letter from John R. Brescia to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968

John R. Brescia requests to be sent campaign materials and a schedule of Dr. King's speaking engagements.

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.