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"Illinois (IL)"

Letter to Representatives of Harper & Row and N.A.L from Joan Daves Regarding "Why We Cant Wait"

Tuesday, April 14, 1964
Chicago, IL

This memo serves to inform all parties involved with the publishing of "Why We Can't Wait" of the arranged prepublication agreements made by Mrs. Joan Daves.

Letter from Malcolm X to MLK

Wednesday, July 31, 1963
New York, NY

Malcolm X invites Dr. King, along with other Negro leaders, to give an analysis and a solution on the current "race problem" at a rally in New York on August 10th.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

Letter from A. William Loos to James Farmer

Monday, July 19, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, North Carolina (NC), VIETNAM

A. William Loos expresses his agreement with the actions of the recipient, James Farmer, which lead to the reconsideration of a vote to remove United States troops from Vietnam.

Program: The Call To Worship

Sunday, July 11, 1965
California (CA)

This program outlines the order of service at Friendship Baptist Church in Pasadena, California. Dr. King is highlighted as the guest speaker at the Sunday morning service.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

New York, NY, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

Letter from Anonymous to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Oklahoma (OK)

The author of this letter expresses their concern about poverty across the United States and offers suggestions for Negros to build their own communities.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY, Rhode Island (RI), FRANCE, CAMBODIA, LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC, THAILAND, New Jersey (NJ), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, PHILIPPINES, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, NICARAGUA

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Letter from National Press Club to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

A representative from the National Press Club (Washington, D.C.) writes to Dr. King, asking him to review and correct any inaccuracies in a transcription from a Q & A that took place at the Press Club.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

GREECE, Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), INDIA

Dr. King delivers a sermon that urges his listeners to search for their purpose in life. He requests that his younger listeners attend school and strive for higher education. He stresses to not let the color of their skin keep them from achieving their dreams.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
DENMARK, Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM

Peggy Duff invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen on behalf of the Danish Peace Movement.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), INDIA, UNITED KINGDOM, Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), North Carolina (NC), Florida (FL)

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Telegram from Mrs. Adams and Son to MLK

Sunday, September 21, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mrs. Adams and her son wish Dr. King a "speedy recovery."

Letter from Harold E. Fey to MLK 12/31/59

Thursday, December 31, 1959
Chicago, IL

Dr. King was the recipient of this correspondence from Harold Fey, Editor of 'The Christian Century.' Mr. Fey acknowledged Dr. King's article "How My Mind Has Changed" and raised one concern of why Dr. King didn't mention his stabbing incident, in the article. He referenced Paul in the Bible by quoting Galatians 6:17, "I bear on my body the marks of Jesus." 'The Christian Century' published the article "How My Mind Has Changed."

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966
Atlanta, GA

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

Folder

The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
NIGERIA

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Letter from Mark Staib to MLK

Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mark Staib, a debater at John Carroll University, requests that Dr. King sends information on the debate topic: "Resolved: that the federal government should guarantee a minimum annual cash income for every citizen."

SCLC Duties

Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Louisiana (LA), Tennessee (TN)

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN)

Major J. Jones writes to Dr. King, offering to host the SCLC's Annual Spring Board Meeting in Chattanooga, where he is a district superintendent of the Methodist Church. Mr. Jones mentions that having the SCLC in Chattanooga would help the city. However, Dr. King couldn't accept Mr. Jones' invitation due to prior arrangements to host the 1965 SCLC Spring Board Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967
Connecticut (CT)

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Telegram from MLK Congratulating Georgia Legislators Elect

Friday, June 18, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King congratulates Grace Hamilton, William Alexander, Julian Bond, J. D. Grier, and J. C. Daugherty on their recent election to the Legislature of the State of Georgia. He offers his support in "our quest for freedom and human dignity."

Letter from Cirilo McSween to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY)

Cirilo McSween congratulates Dr. King for the reorganization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Henry N. Flynt, Jr. to MLK

Sunday, October 15, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Henry N. Flynt expresses his appreciation for a copy of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here" and compliments Dr. King on the quality of the book.

A Tribute to the MLK

Monday, November 30, 1964
Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Several organizations in Stamford, Connecticut sponsor a tribute in honor of Dr. King. This document outlines the program participants, and lists Dr. King as providing the keynote address.

National Emergency Action Committee Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

This document states that the Provisional Executive Committee of the National Emergency Action Committee will meet in Chicago on Wednesday, February 22, 1967. The document then givies the meeting agenda.