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"Illinois (IL)"

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to MLK about Court Case

Wednesday, November 29, 1961

Chauncey Eskridge, Dr. King's legal counsel, sent this message requesting the signatures of Dr. King's parents on a legal document. The latter part of the message asks for Rev. King, Sr. to trust the expertise of Attorney Eskridge.

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Tuesday, August 20, 1963

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Letter from Norman Edward & Katherine Kowal to SCLC

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Impressed by a sermon delivered by Dr. King, Norman Edward and Katherine Ann Kowal contributes to the SCLC.

Letter from Theresa Sutherland to Coretta S. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Theresa Sutherland sends her condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."

Invitation from Israeli Ambassador to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965

In this letter, Avraham Harman invites Dr. King to Israel on behalf of the Embassy of Israel.

Letter Dated 2/1/63 from Frank Elliott to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963

Frank Elliot is writing to notify Dr. King that he has received the revised sermon "Antidotes of Fear," and it will be in the galley proofs. Elliot states that the galley proofs will be sent to Dr. King's office no later than Feburary 7th. He wants to meet with Dr. King to discuss any problems that may arise.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Monday, August 13, 1962

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

Telegram to MLK from Treasurer W. E. Shortridge

Thursday, August 9, 1962

Members of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights send Dr. King encouraging words during his sentence at Albany City Jail.

Numbers

Dr. King records class notes from the biblical Book of Numbers regarding ethics, knowledge, and sin.

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

Letter To Mr. Kennady From Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter to Mr. Kennady, Miss Dora McDonald informs him that Dr. King is happy to grant permission to mimeograph copies of his article entitled " A New King Of Power".

Telegram to Mrs. J. Tower from John Howard Griffen

Thursday, June 11, 1964

This telegram documents Griffen's commentary on one of Dr. King's publications.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Letter from Erma Hughes to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 14, 1964

Ms. Hughes, college President and Founder, advises Ms. McDonald to inform Dr. King that he should anticipate numerous invitations after an article appears in the newspaper announcing him as a guest at her college.

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Wednesday, February 12, 1964

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

MLK to Confer in June to Plan Summer Drive Here

Monday, May 29, 1967

Referencing Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Bob Modic wrote about an upcoming meeting in Cleveland, Ohio. This meeting was in preparation for the implementation of a campaign to increase employment and housing opportunities for the city's African Americans.

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

Letter from Joyce Armstrong to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Joyce Armstrong of Detroit, Michigan expresses concern regarding segregation and equality in Birmingham, Alabama.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.

Letter From MLK to Reverend Sanders

In this letter, Dr. King expresses gratitude for the efforts Rev. Sanders has taken toward battling poverty.

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

Thursday, March 31, 1966

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

Telegram to MLK from the Dogwood Tree

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Dr. King receives a telegram of support from "The Dogwood Tree." The telegram conveys that "the orthodox Jewish religion is working for you. Keep your faith...."

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King examines the contradictions in human nature in this handwritten draft of a sermon.