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Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

Letter from International Institute for Peace to MLK

Sunday, June 12, 1966

O. P. Paliwal and Yves Choliere, from the World Council of Peace, invite Dr. King to speak at a session in Geneva about the well being of Vietnam.

Acknowledgement of Condolences

A standard form of an acknowledgment response, in reference to the receipt of condolences, is highlighted in this document.

The Road to Freedom

This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

Letter from Perceel Lanfair to MLK

Perceel Lanfair informs Dr. King that she and her husband are looking for a larger apartment.

Telegram from MLK to Richard Maguire of the DNC

Dr. King informs Richard Maguire of the Democratic National Committee that he is unable to accept an invitation to the pre-inaugural dinner.

Letter from MLK to Jan Helge Jansen

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Oslo, Norway in the fall of 1964. He informs the requester that the "present temper of events in this section of the country" has influenced him to adopt a policy of not accepting invitations more than two months in advance. He states, however, that he will keep the invitation on file and communicate with the sender in September regarding his eligibility to accept the invitation.

Letter from J. V. Jones to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

J.V. Jones questions whether Dr. King's position on the Vietnam war is helping the black race because he believes otherwise. Jones also encloses a Walter Winchell article from the Los Angeles Harold Examiner.

Job and Suffering

Dr. King writes on the biblical figure Job and his view of suffering.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Rosen to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Mrs. Samuel Rosen writes Dr. King recollecting when she marched with him in Montgomery. Rosen states that she and her husband are proud of Dr. King and his works regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Herman Will, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Herman Will, Associate General Secretary for the Division of Peace and World Order, General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church expresses his appreciation to Dr. King.

Man

Dr. King quotes T. E. Hulme's publication Speculation regarding the nature of man.

Letter from W. C. Akers to MLK

W. C. Akers expresses his concern about Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. and Mrs. King

Monday, February 11, 1963

Benjamin E. Mays invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Founder's Day Banquet at Morehouse College.

Letter from Heather Davidson to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Miss Heather Davidson invites Dr. King to speak during the University of Western Ontario's Religion-in-Life-Week.

Secrets of Married Happiness

Dr. King writes notes regarding the way to a successful marriage. King asserts that in order to have a happy marriage, husband and wife must communicate and get to know one another's similarities and differences. It is also important to engage in mutual compromise.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 17, 1957

Dr. King interprets Jesus' command to "love your enemies" and outlines how to accomplish this goal. He closes this sermon by relating the philosophy of love to the use of nonviolence as a means to overcome oppression.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Yvonne Hairston

Thursday, July 20, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King addresses Ms. Hairston's concerns about his opposition to the war in Vietnam.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Catherine Aller writes Dr. King regarding his awareness of agape and its "historic appearance on the Day of Pentecost."

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Letter from Lucius D. Clay to MLK

Sunday, June 16, 1963

Retired Army Officer Lucius D. Clay, responds to Dr. King, informing him that his telegram has be forwarded to T. C. Fogarty.

Ode to Freedom

Monday, July 20, 1959

"Ode to Freedom" is a list of declarations used to inspire and uplift those involved in the movement.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes a scripture from the Old Testament book of Job regarding immortality and the "affirmation of the mortality of man."

Theology

Dr. King cites theologian Emil Brunner's "The Mediator," and discusses the topic of theology as it relates to the church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Charles R. Bell Jr. about Beating of a Prisoner

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

In this correspondence, Dr. King offers thanks to Rev. Bell for his letter about the "horrible beating" of a Negro prisoner in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.