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Letter from Milton R. Young to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Republican North Dakota Senator Milton Young thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram expressing his views on pending voting rights legislation.

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Letter from Corinne B. Hill and Harold Stassen to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Harold Stassen correspond with Dora McDonald expressing gratitude for a letter sent a few days earlier. The letter involves a book to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. King to Ms. Dixie Lee Kisor Regarding Home Helper Position

Saturday, June 22, 1963

In this letter dated 6/22/63, Mrs. King informs Ms. Kisor of her decision not to employ her as a home-helper. She and Dr. King believe it would be in the best interest of the children to have someone who would be available on a permanent basis.

Letter from Macedonia Church to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Members of Macedonia Church seek advice and help from Dr. King in regards to continuing Sunday worship service.

Event Program for Chester Robinson Tribute

Speaking invitation to Dr. King for a tribute to Chester Robinson and the West Side Organization at the First Congregational Church in Chicago.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gay to MLK

Friday, August 16, 1963

Britt and Hagel Gay write Dr. King enclosing a contribution to help him in his "wonderful work."

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

The Second Sunday After Easter

Sunday, April 28, 1968

The preacher begins by reminding the audience about various forms of evil, the church's mission to help humans obtain heavenly rights and other topics from the previous week's sermon. After recapping last Sunday's sermon, the preacher uses the Word of God to answer the question, "How should Christians react to the afflictions they suffer in the world?" The three answers to this question are broken up into three different sections and explained in depth by the speaker.

Telegram from Duncan Bradford to MLK

Duncan Bradford, the executive secretary for the British Columbia Hospitals' Association, requests for Dr. King to make an address at the national convention to speak out against the atrocities occurring around the word.

The State of Alabama - Equal Administration of Justice

This document addresses issues of discrimination in the South, particularly in Alabama, by state and federal institutions since the Republican Compromise of 1877. The document outlines a response to the many forms of discrimination occurring.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Letter from a Supporter of MLK

An anonymous person pleads with Dr. King to not accept a rumored government job that was offered to him, in exchange of his plans to alleviate poverty.

The Cold War: The Insanity of Deterrence

This brochure depicts a child asking "mommy, what's an H bomb?" and serves as anti-nuclear war propaganda.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

God

In this note on God's love and faithfulness,Dr. King refers to the Old Testament book of Psalms.

Letter from Harry Wunsch to MLK

Harry Wunsch encloses a contribution to support Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Holiday Card from Dr. Nirmal Kumar Bose

The following document is a holiday card from Dr. Bose to Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King to ask him to consider donating his papers to the Atlanta University Center Library as an alternative to Boston University.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Dr. King writes Murray Thomson expressing his inability to accept an invitation to be a consultant for Thomson's organization's conference in Portland, Ontario. He explains that due to his commitment to the civil rights struggle he can only accept a limited amount of engagements.

Final Itinerary for Mrs. Coretta King and Party

This document contains the final itinerary for Mrs. King and her party's trip. The group is traveling with Henderson Travel Service to Oslo, Norway to see Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

Revolt Without Violence - The Negroes' New Strategy

Monday, March 21, 1960

In this 1960 U.S. News & World Report article, Dr. King discusses the lunch counter sit-in movement spurring across the American South, the nonviolent approach to civil rights demonstrations, and the evolving status of the Negro.

Letter from Adele Fishman to MLK

Monday, August 31, 1964

The American Book Company is requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail." They hope to include the letter, in a text book, entitled THE STREAM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, THIRD Edition. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.