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"Illinois (IL)"

Letter to Mrs. King from Jose Nieto

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Letter from Irving Frank to MLK

Irving Frank urges Dr. King to continue speaking out against the Vietnam War. Frank also encloses a check in support of Dr. King.

Morality

Dr. King quotes Adolf Hitler on the "dirty and degrading self-mortification" of conscience and morality, from Erich Meissner's "Confusion of Faces."

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

Letter from High School Student Jeanne Adams to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Joanne Adams, a student from Central High School, writes Dr. King to voice her support for what he is doing for negro citizens in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.

Letter from MLK to Thomas R. Jones

Monday, July 29, 1963

Dr. King thanks the Honorable Thomas R. Jones for his financial and moral support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Selma Friendship Day Report

This document highlights information surrounding "Selma Friendship Day," which was a white-led counter-protest intended to offset the effects of Kingian boycotts. This counter-protest was met with a demonstration, in which 120 pro-Kingian persons were arrested and the local SCLC office was barricaded.

Letter from Tenant to MLK

A tenant from a "slum" building writes to Dr. King requesting help for the building in which she lives. Throughout the letter she lists several problems with the building and hopes that Dr. King can offer assistance.

Men of Past and Present Pamphlet

This pamphlet features quotes 'Men of Past and Present,' including religious and political leaders, on democracy and cooperatives.

God

Dr. King quotes a passage from Psalms 77:13, which discusses the greatness of God through comparison to other gods.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Letter from Miss D. McDonald to The Rev. Julian J. Keiser

Monday, June 22, 1964

Miss McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, assures Reverend Keiser that Dr. King's recent trip to Los Angeles was a pleasnt experience. Miss McDonald conveys Dr. King's hope that his "appearance, in some way, proved helpful."

MLK's Column on Jackie Robinson's Induction in Hall of Fame

Saturday, August 4, 1962

In this column from the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King echoes his speech at the induction of Jackie Robinson into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Robinson not only broke the color barrier in major league baseball, MLK points out, he succeeded in business. MLK lauds Robinson's truth-telling as he spoke out against discrimination in the north and south, by whites and blacks, and on racial and religious grounds.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Sin

Dr. King interprets Leviticus 4:3, a verse which implies that a community can incur guilt for the sins of its high priest.

Righteousness

Dr. King records a quote on righteousness from Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

Adverse Letter from R. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

R. Johnson writes to Dr. King wishing physical violence against him. The author refers to Dr. King as "Big Mouth."

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Letter from MLK to Charles E. Merrill, Jr.

Friday, November 4, 1966

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Merrill's contribution to the SCLC. He also states that he looks forward to seeing Mr. Merrill at the Morehouse College of Trustees meeting taking place the following week.

Dr. King's Children Viewing his Body for First Time at the Funeral, April, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Order of Contingents In April Parade in New York

This document lists the parade order for an anti-Vietnam war demonstration in New York. It also lists official slogans and regulations concerning the use of signs and placards.

People In Action: Nothing Changing Unless

Sunday, January 28, 1962

In his regular column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes in support of a 435 million dollar job training bill that would "salvage a segment of the unemployed and potentially employable."

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. V. Willis

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Coatesville, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP. He explains that his recent commitment to the SCLC Board to tour the South for a voter registration campaign prevents him from accepting any additional speaking engagements.

Draft of Speech On Passage of 1965 Voting Rights Act

Dr. King discusses the prevalence of racial issues in society. Discrimination and segregation still occur but through means in which the government has not declared unconstitutional. One of the main problems discussed was housing discrimination. Many African Americans were forced to live in slum housing in bad areas because they were not able to buy a house in the "white neighborhoods." Dr. King states that this type of social injustice cannot continue if the nation wants to progress.