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Aristotle's Answer to Parmenides

Dr. King outlines Aristotle's response to Parmenides regarding being and nothingness.

The Brotherhood of Mount Calvary Baptist Church

Sunday, October 12, 1958

Mount Calvary Baptist Church held their annual men's day program on October 12, 1958 in honor of Dr. King's "courageous fight for integration."

Letter from Sydney J. Chase to MLK

Wednesday, March 16, 1960

Mr. Chase, a political science major at Hofstra College, has reached out to Dr.King inquiring about assistance with his term paper on "non-violence as a political force."

Anxiety

Dr. King distinguishes anxiety from fear, noting that fear is directed toward things, while anxiety is directed toward nothingness.

Some Information About Black Africa Culture

This document discusses various discoveries that have been made about African civilizations and their cultures.

A Decade of SCLC

In this 10th Anniversary Journal for the SCLC, there are several topics covered to highlight the ten years of activity of the organization. Beginning with a story of the Civil Rights Movement's beginning, featuring Rosa Parks, to an article entitled "Where Do We Go From Here?"; this booklet summarizes many of the efforts made during the ten year existence of the SCLC.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

MLK's Remarks to Swedish Audience

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Dr. King delivers a speech in Stockholm, Sweden applauding the nation's commitment and support of racial justice in America. King further articulates his belief that despite several social ills people will "be able to sing together in the not too distant future."

Letter from Robert Kyser to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Robert Keyser, Coordinator of Choice '68 at Graceland College, writes Dr. King requesting campaign materials, just three weeks before his assassination. Choice '68 was the Time Magazine sponsored collegiate primary for the Presidential election in which Dr. King and Dr. Spock were encouraged to run as a ticket.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

This pamphlet provides information regarding the history, purpose and plans for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Seating List for Pacem In Terris II

This document is an alphabetical seating list of participants for the Pacem In Terris II (Peace on Earth) Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland.

Letter from Wayne Woods to MLK

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Pastor Wayne Woods, President of the Washington Ministers Association, inquires if Dr. King would speak to the organization on the subject "August 28 in Retrospect."

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Thursday, November 17, 1966

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Monday, November 14, 1966

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

Letter from Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966

Ms. Dubois writes to Dr. King regarding the strategy of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches. She believes that a change in attitude of whites, so that they desire to work with "Americans of darker complexion" should be a part of this strategy.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Letter from Lyman Cady to MLK

Wednesday, July 5, 1967

Lyman Cady, of Westminister Presbyterian Church, expresses his support for Dr. King's recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" He also commends Dr. King's overall leadership throughout the Civil Rights Movement.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

In this letter, is enclosed a check from Alfred A. Knopf Inc. for the use of "What Next? Five Negro Leaders Reply" in the book "Minorities In A Changing World by Milton L. Baron.

Letter of Inquiry from Carol Hess to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968

In this letter Carol Hess of New York requests an audience with Dr. King. She is writing a paper pertaining to the Birmingham March.

Evil (Natural)

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson on the topic of evil.

Letter of Appreciation from Governor Richard J. Hughes to MLK

Thursday, August 29, 1963

In this letter, Governor of New Jersey, Richard Hughes expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his inspiring words to America on Freedom Day during Washington March.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Letter from Francis Stern to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965

Francis H. Stern, Chairman of the Humanitarian Award Committee, writes Dr. King informing him that he has been selected unanimously to receive the 1964 Brith Sholom Humanitarian Award. Stern points out that past recipients include Eleanor Roosevelt, Thurgood Marshall, Rabbi Stephen Wise, UN secretary general Trygvie Lie, and former Prime Minister of Australia Herbert Evatt.

Tillich's Definition of God

Dr. King documents philosopher Paul Tillich's definition of God from his book "Systematic Theology."

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter from John Isaacson to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

John Isaacson, on behalf of the Student Steering Committee for the Senior Symposia at Dartmouth College, invites Dr. King to come speak on the topic "The Critic and Government Policy."