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Letter from Friends of the SNCC to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Richard Meier and Lowell Bergman request Dr. King's support for a letter-writing campaign directed at members of the Wisconsin State Senate and Assembly.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, December 3, 1946

Dr. King writes six short essays for an examination in his Bible course.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

The State of Alabama - Equal Administration of Justice

This document addresses issues of discrimination in the South, particularly in Alabama, by state and federal institutions since the Republican Compromise of 1877. The document outlines a response to the many forms of discrimination occurring.

MLK Speaker's Contract

Monday, April 3, 1967

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin.

Telegram from Patricia E. Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Patricia E. Smith writes Dr. King to congratulate him "on dignity maintained and balanced general gently Christian position."

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row, informs Dr. King about the enclosure of the first copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter to Clark, Dodge and Company from MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Here is a letter from Dr. King to anonymous donor through Clark, Dodge and Company acknowledging the receipt of stock shares to the SCLC. Dr. King goes on to elaborate on how this contribution will directly impact the efforts of SCLC.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Thursday, March 29, 1962

Dr. King recommends that President John F. Kennedy consider William H. Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Letter from the Martin Luther King Fund to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

A representative from the Martin Luther King Fund corresponds with Miss McDonald to schedule a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from James Godfrey to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Mr. Godfrey invites Dr. King to speak at the Radio Music Hall in Washington D.C. for a fundraising event on behalf of the NAACP.

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Friday, June 28, 1963

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

Letter from Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Time Magazine's Otto Fuerbringer informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King's picture is apart of a traveling Time cover exhibit. He pledges to forward copies of Dr. King's family portrait.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Wednesday, July 8, 1964

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Letter from "The Nation" to MLK

"The Nation" sends Dr. King payment for his article, "Let Justice Roll Down." The article was published in the March 15, 1965 edition of the publication.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to Hans Massaquoi

In this telegram, Dora McDonald writes to Mr. Massaquoi from Ebony Magazine, informing him that Dr. King is not left handed.

Theology

Dr. King comments on theology and theological science.

Prevenient Grace

Dr. King defines prevenient grace, identifying it as Augustine’s view.

September 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s secretary writes Joan Daves to inform her of his absence.

Friday, September 11, 1964

Dora McDonald, secretary to Dr. King, wrote Joan Daves to inform her that Dr. King will look into the request from Philip Unwin upon his return from Berlin.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to MLK Regarding His NewBook

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

In this letter, Kaplan requests an autographed copy of Dr. King's new book enclosed with a personal message. Mr. Kaplan also requests that Dr. King autograph the books ordered from Harper & Row, since he gets a discount buying in bulk.

SCLC's Interest in the Chicago Education System

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference initiates improvement for Chicago's education system by making recommendations. It is believed that the inadequacies of education are not only a southern issue, but a national occurrence.

Letter from Clifford Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Clifford Alexander, Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, sends Dr. King a report involving discrimination against Jews in the workplace. According to the report, numerous members of the Jewish community face prejudice from receiving management level jobs in the white collar sector.

Letter from Mike Epstein to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Mr. Epstein thanks Dr. King for his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement and his stance on the war in Vietnam. Epstein considers Dr. King's status as "a man of judgment" an asset.

Letter from Bernard Roche to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Roche asks Dr. King whether he has considered that whites not only intimidate and murder African Americans, but also each other. He argues that whites don't treat anyone any worse than they treat themselves.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."