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"Indiana (IN)"

King to Visit Southside Virginia

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

This article describes Dr. King's visit to Virginia on the "people-to-people" tour as a part of the Poor People's Campaign.

SCLC News Release: The State of Negro Education in the South

This SCLC news release discusses the terrible educational conditions endured by African American students in the South. It also highlights effective solutions to exposing "negro youngsters" to better teachers and a better quality of learning.

Letter from Rabbi Martin E. Katzenstein to MLK

Thursday, September 26, 1963

Rabbi Martin Katzenstein writes Dr. King to express appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the worship service at Temple Israel in St. Louis, Missouri. He expresses the impact that Dr. King's address had on the congregation and the African American community in St. Louis. He encloses contributions from church service and a check to cover Dr. King's travel expenses.

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

Sunday, January 3, 1965

Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

Letter from MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Thursday, February 22, 1968

This is a copy of the response letter dated February 9, 1968. It is addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Letter from MLK to The Boston Globe

Friday, February 24, 1967

Dr. King expresses gratitude to The Boston Globe for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1956

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from Tom to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 27, 1967

Tom suggests to Dora McDonald that Dr. King accept ABC's invitation to appear on the show "Issues and Answers."

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

Sin

Dr. King quotes two verses from the book of Leviticus.

Ebenezer Project Bill

Citizens Trust Company reminds the SCLC of an upcoming payment related to the "Ebenezer Project."

Death of Dr. King

This photo was taken after Dr. King's assassination and contains slogans in support for the fallen leader.

Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Temple Sholom Bulletin

Saturday, September 19, 1964

This issue of the Temple Shalom Bulletin highlights Dr. King and his accomplishments during the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter of Gratitude and Concern from Eulah M. Eubank to Charles R. Baker of IAD

Sunday, February 18, 1968

In this letter Eulah Eubank points to an urgent situation. Hence, Eubank writes with the intention of receiving resources to continue the fight against injustice. Finally, she communicates her sustained commitment to volunteering with the Anti Defamation League and Open for Opinion via radio monitoring.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Monday, November 14, 1966

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

This document is a memo updating Dr. King of requests, invitations and current SCLC finances.

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter from J. Percy to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

J. Percy sends Dr. King an unpleasant note asserting that he is always complaining. Percy also wishes that Dr. King would stop talking about slums.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Letter from Robert Starbuck to the SCLC

Wednesday, May 19, 1965

Robert Starbuck encloses a contribution to the SCLC on behalf of supporters from Berlin, Germany. Starbuck has affiliations with many individuals tied to the American Civil Rights Movement and believes that it is imperative to contribute to the cause.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Letter from MLK to C.W. Greene

Thursday, August 10, 1967

In this letter to C.W. Greene of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, Dr. King requests supplies for an upcoming convention.

Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Letter from Laura Lofferty to SCLC

Friday, April 5, 1968

Laura Lofferty writes to the leadership of SCLC expressing sympathy for the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1962

Governor Rockefeller writes Dr. King expressing his support for the work King is doing and asserts his desire to assist him in any way.