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"Indiana (IN)"

Letter from Jim Morton to Members of the UTC Board of Directors

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Jim Morton communicates the results of the executive committee conference call in preparation for a board member conference call at a later date. The Urban Training Center for Christian Mission is dedicated to community action and supports additional organizations. The training center is attempting to input a new training program and have appointed three staff positions.

Telegram from Berry Gordy, Jr. to MLK

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

President of Motown Record Corporation, Berry Gordy, Jr., awaits Dr. King's decision on the album, "The Great March on Washington."

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

Thursday, April 1, 1965
Baltimore, MD

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Judith D. Greenberg to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Judith Greenberg of the Stern College for Women asks Dr. King about material for a report concerning Choice '68.

God

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth regarding the nature of God. In addition, Dr. King provides bibliographical information for the quote.

Letter from MLK to James L. Hicklin

Monday, February 25, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses gratitude for being considered for a position on the National Board of Governors for the Freedom For All Foundation, but he declines due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and other pastoral duties.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an issue of Cuadernos, which printed a Spanish version of his Berlin address about President Kennedy. A copy of "Why We Can't Wait" is sold to Figaro Litteraire.

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Barth

Dr. King notes Swiss theologian Karl Barth's favorite expression on revelation.

Letter from SNCC's Judy Richardson to Coretta Scott King

Sunday, September 5, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Judy Richardson of SNCC writes to Mrs. King to give her a copy of the new Negro history primer, "Negroes in American History." The book serves as a method of teaching children about African American history while tying in elements of the Civil Rights Movement.

News from the SCEF

Monday, February 19, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Telegram from Abraham Heschel to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Alabama (AL)

Abraham Heschel tells Dr. King that he has a deep identification with the goals that Dr. King is dedicated to and offers him encouragement.

Letter of invitation from Rabbi Albert A. Goldman to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Goldman invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker for the Community Thanksgiving Service at The Isaac M. Wise temple in Ohio.

Housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia

Wednesday, June 24, 1959
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA

This document discusses the critical need of housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia. The role of Atlanta Urban League and the federal Housing Administration in seeking housing for Negroes are discussed and unpublished Commission on Race and Housing reports are exposed that illustrate housing discrimination in Atlanta between 1945 and 1958.

Letter From A. S. Raman to MLK

Thursday, December 8, 1966
INDIA, Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Raman invites Dr. King to be a part of a discussion in the anniversary issue of the Indian Republic by contributing about 800 to the article.

Letter from Mrs. Sammie Adams to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Sammie Adams, a 67-year-old widow, writes an emotional appeal to Dr. and Mrs. King in an effort to collect money for Easter clothes for her children. She acknowledges that she previously donated to Dr. King and the cause for civil rights and would benefit from some assistance.

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

Letter from Charles Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Virginia (VA)

Charles Johnson offers suggestions to Dr. King about job creation following the violent riots that took place in the summer of 1967. He proposes that the federal government intervene and allow younger potential workers to enter into the job force and retire those who have been employed a long time. According to Johnson, employing these young workers will eliminate the uprisings seen in various urban cities around the United States.

Letter from Louise A. Andrews to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

On behalf of the American Friends Service Committee, Louise Andrews invites Dr. King to attend and speak at one of their Regional offices in Pennsylvania or Wisconsin.

Letter from Richard Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

Richard Bennett requests a letter of greeting from Dr. King to be read at the Minnesota Federation of Teachers Educational Conference.

Letter from John G. Hodgson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966
Washington, D.C.

John G. Hudson requests that Dr. King use Hodgson Travel Service for an upcoming trip to the Holy Land.

Check Distribution for the Crusade for Citizenship Program

Friday, December 31, 1965
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mildred Smith is given a check on behalf of the Crusade for Citizenship program.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Introduction to Philosophy." Brightman was a Christian theologan in the Methodist tradition.

Letter from MLK to Minnie N. Thompson

Monday, April 9, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Minnie N. Thompson for her encouragement. He states he will make an effort to meet her son when he visits the Morehouse College Campus.

Nationalism

Dr. King refers to Jeremiah 1:5, explaining that this passage represents a departure from nationalism toward a more universal emphasis.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein

Monday, January 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King sends thanks to Mr. and Mrs. S.G. Greenstein for a contribution made to the SCLC.

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

God's Existence

Dr. King cites Paul Tillich's perception of God's existence. This ideology is a Christological paradox for God "is being-itself" and beyond the essence of existence.

Transformed Nonconformists Sermon Outline

In this brief outline for a sermon based on Romans 12:2, Dr. King asserts that Christians are citizens of two worlds, those of time and eternity. They are in the world, but not of it. In a generation of the mass mind, they are called to live differently – to make history not be made by history. But nonconformity in itself is not good; there must be a mental transformation. The world is on the brink of moral and physical destruction and the need of the hour is for nonconformists to materialism, nationalism and militarism.