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Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Letter from Marian Machesney to MLK

Wednesday, November 22, 1961

Marian Machesney writes Dr. King to praise the book "Stride toward Freedom." Machesny also explains the issues of a family where the children are in need of food and education while describing the help he has offered them. Mr. Macheaney expresses his wish to be ordained as a minister by the Western Christian Leadership ministers and states that he is ready to quite entirely if he does not receive the help or advice he has been seeking.

The Urban Coalition

Friday, March 1, 1968

The Urban Coalition's weekly report from the National Coordinator details the newly introduced bill which provides $150 million for summer jobs and anti-poverty programs. The report further discusses the monetary inadequacies for programs involving employment, education, and recreation. A proposal is established by the Office of Economic Opportunity to adhere to the summer programs.

Letter from Matthew Schoenwald to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964

Matthew Schoenwald , manager of the Undergarment and Negligee Workers Union, encloses a check in the amount of $100 as a contribution to the SCLC.

Transformed Nonconformist

In this draft of the "Transformed Nonconformist", Dr. King urges the abandonment of societal practices of injustice.

Letter from Reverend A. S. Markham to MLK

Friday, November 27, 1964

Rev. Markham requests a response from Dr. King to an earlier letter. In the previous letter, Markham informed Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom Synagogue would like to present an award to Dr. King.

Brunner & Niebuhr

Dr. King relates Swiss theologian Emil Brunner to American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, in that they both argue that reason is for adjusting to the material world, and faith is for dealing with God.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

A Call to Vietnam Week

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

Monday, April 17, 1967

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Max Stanford's Account

This document written by an anonymous writer illustrates how officers attacked Max Stanford, a convicted felon, in a jail when he refused to obey a guard.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Get Well Letter from Mr. David George Ball to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Mr. David George Ball, Chairman of the University Lecture Committee for the Yale University Christian Association, forwarded to Dr. King this get well letter.

Statement of Royalty Account

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

This financial statement reflects SCLC's affiliation with Motown Record Corporation.

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

Letter from Walter Simcich to MLK

Monday, August 9, 1965

The International Woodworkers of America invites Dr. King to speak at its biennial convention in Toronto. Additionally, Mr. Simcich extends an invitation to speak at the British Columbia Federation of Labour's convention in Vancouver.

Letter Starlet Roberts to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Starlet Roberts, a fifth grade student, asks Dr. King for a picture for her class book of Famous Negroes.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in a Bon Voyage to Europe

Thursday, January 29, 1959

The Fair Share Organization presents Dr. King in a "Bon Voyage to Europe." Dr. King will be delivering an address for Indiana Reverend Julius James, a former Morehouse College classmate of Dr. King's. Also included are advertisements of people and businesses who donated to the Fair Share Organization.

The Advances of Operation Breadbasket

Monday, December 5, 1966

This document displays two articles that report on the progress made by "Operation Breadbasket" in Chicago. The first article discusses SCLC's negotiations with High-Low Foods, a Chicago chain that agreed to implement business practices that would serve "Negro-owned" businesses in the community and increase black employment in the company. The second article highlights similar negotiations carried out with National Tea Co., another Chicago based business. Civil Rights leaders Jesse Jackson and Rev.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

MLK Handwritten Note Card - "Peace of Mind or Soul"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Peace of Mind or Soul," Dr. King quotes Dr. C.G. Jung on the subject of neurosis.

MLK's Statement on Church Bombing in Leesburg, GA

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

MLK expresses his clear disgust with the actions of the civil rights resisters, denouncing their bombing of a local church.

Letter from Reverend Michael Scott to MLK

Monday, December 3, 1962

Reverend Michael Scott, of the International Committee for the Study of Group Rights in London, writes Dr. King expressing that the organization would like him to become an Honorary President. Scott explains, "this need not involve more than our being able to use your name."

Memo from Stroy Freeman to Englewood Clergy

In this memo, Stroy Freeman informs the Englewood Clergy of Dr. King's attendance for the "withdrawal of accounts campaign" from Chicago City Bank.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."