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Letter from MLK to Carmen Baptista

Dr. King writes Carmen Baptista expressing deep appreciation for his letter of encouragement and for sending a recording of his song, "Coming Down the Road."

Handwritten Letter from MLK to "Dorothy"

This document is a draft of an addendum to a letter Dr. King had previously worked on and is addressed to "Dorothy." While most of this document centers on "support" and is based on form templates, Dr. King specifically mentions a "suggestion concerning 'Lil Abuer" [phonetic].

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Report of A Participant

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

Man

Dr. King quotes T. E. Hulme's publication Speculation regarding the nature of man.

Letter from Laurence Pollinger to Joan Daves

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Laurence Pollinger Limited writes to Joan Daves, Literary Agent for Dr. King, to make an offer for the advances and royalties to be received from the publication of "Where Do We Go From Here?" A request is also made for permission to change the title to Chaos or Community.

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.

MLK Statement to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement to Time Magazine, Dr. King responds to President John F. Kennedy's call for new civil rights legislation.

Anticipated Public School Desegregation in Southern and Border States

Thursday, August 22, 1957

This memorandum provides a list of schools and school systems expected to desegregate in September of 1957. The Southern Regional Council, Inc. also includes vital information concerning pending Negro applications for school admittance and schools actively involved in litigation.

Letter from James C. Goodwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

Mr. Goodwin, Executive Director of the Bay Area Neighborhood Development Non-profit Foundation, informs Dr. King of an artist who would like to present him the painting "Give Me a Future."

Memorandum from William M. Gray

Friday, April 5, 1968

This memorandum from William M. Gray lists the address to which mourners should send acknowledgements following Dr. King's death.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land

This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Public Meeting

Monday, August 10, 1964

Dr. King is listed as the keynote speaker for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Forty-First Boule on August 10, 1964.

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

Monday, April 10, 1967

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

I Have Decided to Start With Myself

Monday, August 14, 1967

This dictation of the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet includes speeches given by Dr. King, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, and Andrew Young. The keynote address given by Mr. Sidney Poitier concluded the evening, along with a presentation of an award.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Members List

This document lists members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, Commission on National Programs and Policies as of December 1965.

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora McDonald

Friday, March 26, 1965

Dr. King's literary agent Joan Daves requests that Dora McDonald send her the full text of Dr. King's speech in Montgomery. She also reports on Dr. King's recent book royalties.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Letter from Ludovic Luke Barrie to MLK Regarding World Bible Society

In this letter, Ludovic Luke Barrie grants Dr. King the title “Honary President of The World Bible Society, Inc.” for all of his accomplishments.

Telegram from Robert L. Green, Floyd McKissack and Roy Wilkins to MLK

Mr. Wilkins, Mr. Kissack and Mr. Green express their viewpoint regarding restrictive racial policies towards the Negro, more specifically towards Negro women by members of the Women's City Club of Detroit. The author encourages a dismembership from the club based on their findings.

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor