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Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Letter from Robert H. Hamill to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Hamill offers his understanding for Dr. King's declination, regarding an unknown situation.

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Letter from Herbert Coulton to Friends

Herbert Coulton, SCLC Director of Affiliates, encourages more supporters to become church affiliates. Mr. Coulton informs readers that the "SCLC is commonly considered as the Social Action Arm of the Christian Churches in America."

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.

Letter from John G. Hodgson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966

John G. Hudson requests that Dr. King use Hodgson Travel Service for an upcoming trip to the Holy Land.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

William Rutherford recounts his difficulties trying to contact Dr. King while he was in the United States. He goes on to express interest in doing fundraising programs for SCLC in Europe, as well as, mobilizing public opinion in support of the cause.

Letter from Thomas Elliott Huntley to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964

Thomas Elliott Huntley, member of the Minnesota House of Representatives, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Baruch Spinoza's "Epistle 21" to Henry Oldenburg.

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

53rd Annual NAACP Convention

Tuesday, June 5, 1962

Serving as an itinerary for the 53rd Annual NAACP Convention, this document outlines the schedule, location, and speakers of the seven-day event.

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

Thursday, January 2, 1969

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

Letter from Robert G. Hardy of KMOX to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 12, 1963

KMOX radio in St. Louis, Missouri would like to have Dr. King on their program called "Sounding Board" for a question and answer session with listeners.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King addresses the United Neighborhood Houses of New York at the Biltmore Hotel. He focuses on the need to alter the ineffective, piecemeal manner in which the government tries to fight poverty by fighting its symptoms, and instead suggest that the government channel those funds into a new "guaranteed annual income" that will help turn non-producers into consumers. This rough draft of the speech contains Dr. King's handwritten revisions and additions.

"Where Do We Go From Here"-Invoice

Monday, May 22, 1967

This document contains a Harper & Row, Publishers invoice for the sale of four copies of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter to the SCLC from The United Church Board for World Ministries

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this document, is a note to request acknowledgement of a $50 dollar contribution, from Andrew C. Mills of New Delhi, India.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Thursday, December 8, 1966

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Lucile Giles

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Lucile Giles that Dr. King will be notified of her books upon his return to the office.

Refinement By Fire

This brochure provides an overview of the SCLC Citizenship Education Program held at the Dorchester Community Center in Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Roosevelt Zanders

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Dr. King thanks Roosevelt Zanders for his hospitality and generosity during his stay in New York. Dr. King expresses his hopes for their paths to cross in the near future and states that he will be sending Mr. Zanders an autographed copy of his book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Handwritten Notecard regarding "Rule of Faith"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the "Rule of Faith." This is an example of the many notecards Dr.King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Letter from Al Hearin to MLK about Public Appearance

Monday, October 30, 1967

In this letter Al Hearin expresses his admiration for Dr. King and his character, but also expresses his concerns that he, Dr. King, is possibly being used by communist elements in society. Hearin also requests that Dr. King write him a handwritten letter about a life changing experience. Furthermore, Hearin requests an autographed picture.

Letter from Maude L. Ballou to Mrs. King about MLK Schedule

Monday, September 22, 1958

The secretary of Dr. King's first pastorate, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, sent this correspondence to Mrs. Coretta Scott King. The letter addresses Dr. King's itinerary, upon his return to Montgomery, and hopes for his full recovery, following his 1958 stabbing in Harlem.