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Letter from James Haughton to a Friend regarding Fundraising

Thursday, February 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA

In this letter James Houghton, of the Committee for a Winter Confrontation with Congress, appeals to friends for financial support of the "poor peoples lobby."

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Outline for "Levels of Love"

In this handwritten outline, Dr. King highlights the subject of love. The document titled, “Levels of Love," focused on four categories: utilitarian love, romantic love, humanitarian love and Christian love.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Friday, December 10, 1965
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
California (CA)

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

Atlanta, GA

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brightman's views on Science and Religion.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from the Morrissetts to MLK and Mrs. King

Sunday, November 30, 1958
Indiana (IN)

Elizabeth Morrissett wishes the King family a Merry Christmas. Mrs. Morrisset also invites Dr. King to come speak at a Purdue University Convocation.

Letter from The Very Rev. Raymond J. Swords to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA)

Fr. Raymond J. Swords, S.J., President of the College of the Holy Cross, writes to Dr. King, expressing how joyous he was to hear that King was selected as the 1964 Nobel Prize Winner.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C., Denver, CO

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Spencer, Herbert

Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer's "First Principles" on the subject of evolution.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA, Des Moines, IA, Georgia (GA)

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Letter from Sylvester Webb to MLK

Thursday, December 23, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Sylvester Webb, Sponsor of the Sixth Grade Graduating Class Gift for Edward Gideon Public School in Philidelphia, informs Dr. King that an oil portrait of him was commissioned by sixth grade class. Webb request King's appearance or one of his advisers for the ceremony to place the portrait in the school lobby. Dr. King would later send Reverend Walter Fauntroy of the SCLC's Washington bureau to represent him.

Letter from Kenneth M. Stewart to MLK

Thursday, December 2, 1965
New York (NY), Tennessee (TN)

Mr. Stewart informs Dr. King that the local paper on Long Island recently ran an ad by the John Birch Society which featured a photograph of Dr. King at the Highlander Folk School. The photograph was used to associate Dr. King with communists. Stewart requests information about the photograph from Dr. King so that he can write a letter to the editor of the paper to protest the insinuation of "guilt by association."

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from Loretta Dun to the SCLC

Monday, December 16, 1963

Loretta Dunn, secretary for the Providence for Civil Rights, Inc., contributes to the SCLC for their efforts in the field of civil rights.

Existentialism Defined

Dr. King provides a descriptive definition of the word Existentialism, based in part on the works of Russian religious and philosophical leader Nikolai Berdyaev.

Negro Population

Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA)

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

Habakkuk

This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

The Negro In America: What Must Be Done

Monday, December 4, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

In a full page of letters to the editor, civil rights advocates praise the Newsweek cover issue on the Negro in America for its analysis of the racial crisis and editorial recommendations for an emergency national program of action.

Sin

Dr. King highlights a definition of sin according to Reinhold Niebuhr.

Letter From PFC Harold Mac Kenzie To MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
San Francisco, CA, THAILAND, South Carolina (SC)

In this letter to Dr. King, serviceman Harold Mac Kenzie explains how he is interested in the welfare of Black people and would like to know how he can contribute to the movement.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Eisenhower Campbell to MLK

Thursday, September 3, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

The Methodist Youth Fellowship of Philadelphia extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Rally in early 1965. The officers of the fellowship also request the address of Reverends Walter Fauntroy and Wyatt Walker of SCLC.

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.