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Who They are and Why They Struck

South Carolina (SC)

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Letter from Dr. King to Mr. David George Ball

Thursday, October 23, 1958
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. George Ball, of the Yale University Christian Association, for the kind outpouring of support during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet, a writer for the Chicago Sun-Times, encloses a copy of his special column including Dr. King's power quote on NBC's Meet the Press. The interview was in direct correlation to the riots that occured in many urban cities.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967
VIETNAM, FRANCE, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

American Negro Concert Pianist Undertakes 100 Cites Tour in Support of Haiti's Pan American Festival of the New World

HAITI, Washington, D.C., SENEGAL

Ambassador Bonhomme announces the Pan American Festival of the New World, proposed and implemented by Negro-American Concert Pianist Robert Pritchard. The festival's inauguration was held in Haiti in the summer of 1969. The event attracted students in the "Pan American hemisphere." The festival's main features focused on the establishment of three summer schools.

Introduction of MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Sacrifice

Dr. King cites passages from Leviticus that suggest that the smell of sacrifice is pleasing to God.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Friday, August 12, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Letter from MLK to Corine Jenkins About Prayer

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Dr. King replies to Corine Jenkins regarding her missing daughter. He informs her that she and her daughter are in his prayers.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Selma, AL

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Letter from Alan J. Rankin to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, January 23, 1967
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs Alan J. Rankin to communicate to Dora McDonald about his availability to speak at the University Christian Council of McMaster University. The theme of the discussion for the "Teach-In" is going to be "The Religious Dilemma of Twentieth Century Man." Mr. Rankin expects over 2,000 students in attendance and church people from Canada. Furthermore, Mr. Rankin asserts that there will be news coverage on this event.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), GERMANY, VIETNAM, BRAZIL, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Helen Meun Addresses the Arlington Demonstration

Thursday, February 8, 1968
Missouri (MO), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Helen Meun writes to members of the SCLC and explains that those involved in the Arlington demonstration were unaware to its purpose. Furthermore, she suggests that the children who were harmed during this demonstration be given an explanation.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Missouri (MO)

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

Letter from Mrs. Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL)

Zabelle Tourian expresses her support for Dr. King, relaying several short statements regarding famous African American persons of recent history.

Letter from George Carlson to MLK

Friday, September 28, 1962
Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

George Carlson informs Dr. King that he handled the public relations and publicity for his appearance in Seattle. In addition, Mr. Carlson notifies Dr. King that the Jewish Temple in Portland requests the status his availability for a speaking engagement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Marcel L. Goldschmid about a Book

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
CANADA

In this letter Dora McDonald informs Dr. M.L. Goldschmid that Dr. King will be unable to write the foreword for his book due to an already filled schedule.

Letter from MLK to Lester Kendel Jackson

Wednesday, July 17, 1963
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King sends a check to Dr. Jackson at St. Paul Baptist Church in Gary, Indiana, to aid with reconstruction of the church.

People In Action : "Birmingham Part 2"

Saturday, August 17, 1963
Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL, Albany, GA, New York (NY), Chattanooga, TN, Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King, along with the SCLC, devises a plan to stop government officials from shutting down public facilities. Dr. King goes on to discuss the racism in Albany and plans to generate peace with the white communities.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Iowa (IA)

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. G. Baker

Friday, July 30, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Baker, President of the Bethune Art and Study Club, for her monetary contribution to the SCLC. King explains that each contribution is necessary for the SCLC to fulfill all its tasks.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick

Monday, May 17, 1965
New York, NY, PUERTO RICO

Andrew Young instructs Dora McDonald to respond to Laurence V. Kirkpatrick's invitation to Dr. King. Ms. McDonald affirms Dr. King's arrival date and informs Mr. Kirkpatrick that they must accommodate the cost expense for two. She asserts that it is necessary for Dr. King to travel with at least one of his aides.

Statement by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

This document contains Dr. King's remarks on injustices in the state of Mississippi. He suggests a complete boycott if the federal or state government is unable to perform the proper means of justice.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding an Outstanding Balance

Wednesday, January 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King of the new student dormitory and inquires about a donation to pay for the cost to furnish one room.