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Draft Letter from MLK to Ms. Giunier

Dr. King responds to an offer of assistance from a supporter. He directs her to the New York office to jumpstart her work and commends her for her interest in the Freedom Movement.

Telegram from MLK to the Letters Department at Newsweek Magazine

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

Dr. King praises Newsweek magazine for making a persuasive appeal to the conscience and sanity of the nation on the racial crisis which engulfs America.

Letter from Norman Taylor to MLK

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Norman Taylor, an agent at Investment Bonds, Inc., commends Dr. King on his work and for being a man of integrity. He offers assistance to help improve the living conditions of the poor in the slums of Chicago.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Schleiermacher (The Immanence of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Wallis E. Wood to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Wood requests an interview with Dr. King to discuss Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Winfred P. Buckwalter III to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Buckwater enclose a check for $500.00 that is intended to assist Dr. King in his efforts to stop the Vietnam conflict and help establish world peace.

Letter from Michell Blue to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

A sixth grader from Berkeley, California writes Dr. King to share his supportive view. In closing the young man remarks, "I don't have much to say but thank you."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Joan Daves urges Dora McDonald to provide notice of Dr. King's public appearances to Harper so that books can be sold at those events.

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Telegram from George Meares to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

On behalf of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, George Meares expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts and achievements.

Letter from AJ Muste to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A.J. Muste encloses a letter from Cherian Thomas to Dr. King and references a previous telegram he sent congratulating Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Freedom

Dr. King summarizes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr and his conceptualization of "Freedom."

Letter from C. Summer Stone Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Chuck Stone, assistant to New York Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, follows up with Dr. King about a telephone conversation between Powell and Dr. King. The discussion centered on Dr. King preaching at Abyssinian for the anniversary service. Stone reiterates Powell's hopes that Dr. King will be able to participate.

Letter from Clark Foreman to MLK

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Clark Foreman, Director of the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Foreman also asks Dr. King to send a message of congratulations to Dr. James A. Dombrowski, who will receive the Tom Paine Award at the 1964 Bill of Rights Dinner. Dombrowski, a Methodist minister, was co-founder of the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 20, 1956

As the President of Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King elaborates on the past twelve months and the city's efforts to fight against racial injustice through the bus boycott. Their journey concluded victoriously with the acknowledgment of the Supreme Court that invalidated segregated transportation. Dr. King informs the Montgomery community that they are to "return to the buses" on a "non-segregated basis."

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.

MLK Address to the United Neighborhood Houses of New York

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

Dr. King addresses the United Neighborhood Houses of New York at the Biltmore Hotel. He focuses on the need to alter the ineffective, piecemeal manner in which the government tries to fight poverty by fighting its symptoms, and instead suggest that the government channel those funds into a new "guaranteed annual income" that will help turn non-producers into consumers. This rough draft of the speech contains Dr. King's handwritten revisions and additions.

Telegram from the New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The New York Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action wishes Dr. King well in his recovery.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Monday, November 14, 1966

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Memorandum

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

This memorandum, sent to Dr. King, expresses the need for a convocation between Negro and white Southern leaders. Recent developments, such as peaceful integration of lunch counters and schools, show that whites are respecting equal rights of Negro citizens more.

Letter from Ozro T. Jones to the SCLC's C. T. Vivian

Friday, May 28, 1965

Ozro Jones, President of the International Youth Congress, writes C. T. Vivian stating that he sincerely appreciates Dr. King for accepting the invitation to speak at the International Youth Congress in Chicago.

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Dr. King's Response to Mrs. W. Bascom

Friday, October 17, 1958

In this letter, Dr. King responded to the get well correspondence sent by Mrs. Willie Bascom. Dr. King took the opportunity to thank her for the kind donation sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He also acknowledged his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.