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Work Summary of Rachel Davis DuBoise

This document is a brief work summary for Rachel Davis DuBoise as a member of the Dialogue Department of SCLC covering the periods from November 1965 to October 1966.

Letter from Harold Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 14, 1964

Tacoma, Washington native Harold Bass sends a contribution to aid in the work of the Civil Rights Movement. Bass, pastor of his own independent church, also forwards Dr. King a copy of their newsletter that promotes peace efforts all over the country.

Letter from Shelley Winters Franciosa to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1959

Actress Shelley Winters sends Dr. King her personal copy of "The Diary of Anne Frank" after he and Mrs. King attend a screening for the film adaptation in New York. Winters would go on to receive an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the film.

Letter from Herbert Wright to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Herbert Wright writes Dr. King to discuss economic development proposals for the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Letter from Lia Bosonetto to MLK Regarding Langston Hughes

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Lia Bosonetto, a college student in Italy, writes Dr. King requesting information on Langston Hughes for her thesis.

News Release from the Presbyterian Office of Information Regarding the CDGM

The United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. releases a statement regarding funding for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM). After hearing statements from Marian Wright, the National Missions staff voted in support of funding for the CDGM. Mary Holmes Junior College has acted as the "enabling agency in channeling" money from the OEO to the CDGM.

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Rev. Hewitt, pastor of the Grace United Church in Gananoque, Ontario, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also extends an invitation to Dr. King to vacation with his family at Half Moon Bay.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Saturday, May 23, 1964

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller thanks Dr. King for sending an advance copy, with inscription, of his new book.


Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Judith Van Swaringen

Tuesday, December 15, 1964

Dorothy Gaines, assistant to Dr. King, responds to a letter from Judith Van Swaringen suggesting that she read the enclosed biographical sketch.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Telegram from Charles McDew to MLK

Thursday, September 13, 1962

Charles McDew petitions the assistance of Dr. King in pursuing a federal investigation of the shootings of several civil rights activists in Mississippi and Southwest Georgia. Charles McDew issued this telegram as a representative of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter of Gratitude and Concern from Eulah M. Eubank to Charles R. Baker of IAD

Sunday, February 18, 1968

In this letter Eulah Eubank points to an urgent situation. Hence, Eubank writes with the intention of receiving resources to continue the fight against injustice. Finally, she communicates her sustained commitment to volunteering with the Anti Defamation League and Open for Opinion via radio monitoring.

Letter from Odell to Dora McDonald

Odell writes to Ms. McDonald, requesting a signature of an enclosed letter from Dr. King.

Letter from David Diamond to MLK

Tuesday, May 31, 1966

David Diamond, author of the book "A Bucket of Whitewash" inquires about Dr. King providing commentary for his upcoming release. As a result, Diamond is set to share royalties from his book sales with the SCLC.

Letter from Irmgard Svenson

Monday, August 14, 1967

Irmgard Svenson requests that Dr. King send copies of his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

MLK's Weekend Itinerary

This itinerary reflects Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements at various churches and schools throughout Alabama.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Royalties Earned from "Stride Toward Freedom"

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

This document references royalties earned in the amount $39.00 from the Van Logham Slaterus' publication of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Wednesday, February 3, 1064

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from June Parker to MLK

June Parker writes to Dr. King with much hesitation, stating that what she is going to say has been on her heart for a long time. Parker writes that she believes Negroes, such as herself, must be free in all aspects of life and not just a few areas. She writes she is not a fan of Dr. King's urging to vote Democrat, and alleges that the Democratic Party gave Dr. King $50,000 for his support. She further states Democrats are just getting their friends to be millionaires while slaughtering young men in their prime.