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Proposed Agenda of Board Meeting

This document is a draft of an outline for the proposed agenda of an SCLC board meeting.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Religion

Dr. King records William Ernest Hocking's definition of religion. Hocking's first name is omitted on the note card.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Christine Schulty to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Christine Schulty offers condolences to Mrs. King after the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Montgomery Improvement Association Press Release About Emergency Conference

Monday, January 7, 1957

This press release from the Montgomery Improvement Association discusses an emergency conference called to address strategies for the integrated transportation campaign.

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

Letter from W. Harding Kneedler to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

Dr. W. Harding Kneedler states that "marches are outdated" and believes that a solution is to have quiet organized action.

Darien Integration

Friday, April 17, 1964

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Laughable Comics Postcard from Johnny B.

The author Johnny B. provides his best wishes to the recipient of this post card, stating "God created everybody equal."

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

Marx

Dr. King expounds on German philosopher Karl Marx and his belief that "material conditions furnished the cause of all historic movements."

War

Dr. King quotes the Executive Committee of the World Council of Churches on war in an atomic age being a sin against God, as reported in The Christian Century.

People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

Existentialism

Dr. King outlines concepts of existentialism as viewed through the doctrine of French existentialist writer Jean Paul Sartre.

Conscience

Dr. King ponders the meaning of the word 'conscience.' He questions the nature of conscience and ultimately sees it as a necessary sense of obligation that makes a difference in the life of a civilization.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa calls for all news media and wireless services to broadcast the release of "Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia." This call to action was prompted by racial rebellions led by Ian Smith. It was the hope of civil rights leaders to strengthen "Negro" and African relations by increasing support of peace in Africa.

Objects and the Nature of Thought

Dr. King notates the various explanations of "objects" and "the nature of thought."

Prayer

Dr. King records a prayer.

Letter from Leonard L. Smalls to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

Leonard Smalls invites Dr. King to speak at the Men's Day Conference at the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Barry Gray to Jackie Robinson

Monday, August 22, 1966

Barry Gray, an influential American radio personality, writes Jackie Robinson expressing his disappointment with how he dealt with countering issues. According to Gray, Robinson sent a letter to "distinguished Americans, including his friends" and presumably blackmailed him. Gray discusses his input in the Civil Rights Movement through exposing unequal systems through television and radio.