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Letter from Edmund W. Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, September 27, 1967
New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA), Chicago, IL

Edmund W. Gordon, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance at Yeshiva University, invites Dr. King to serve on the Dr. W.E.B. DuBois memorial committee. The committee proposes a memorial park to honor Dr. DuBois in his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Boston, MA, Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Philadelphia, PA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963
Detroit, MI

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Missouri (MO)

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

Letter from Janet Somerville to MLK

Atlanta, GA

Janet Somerville writes to Dr. King, expressing how he has been a renewal of hope for her. She also thanks Dr. King, his family and the SCLC for their hospitality during her visit to Atlanta.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, POLAND, HUNGARY

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Invitation from the United Federation of Teachers to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

The United Federation of Teachers invite Dr. King to their annual Spring Conference Luncheon. At this particular event, civil rights activist Bayard Rustin will be honored with the John Dewey Award.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NORWAY, CHINA

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Letter from Wilton Hall Jr to MLK

Friday, January 13, 1967
South Carolina (SC), New York, NY

President of Droke House Publishers, Wilton Hall, Jr., requests copies of Dr. King's speeches, sermons, press conferences, articles, and interviews for the completion of a book volume entitled "The Quotable Martin Luther King."

SCLC Form Letters

The first letter states that Dr. King is out of the city for a few days. The second letter expresses gratitude for the recipient's moral support and Christian generosity.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), DENMARK

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Telegram from MLK to Judy Silver & Gordon Geller

Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King salutes the Cincinnati Committee of Concern for Soviet Jewry for their efforts to end discrimination against the Jewish people of the U.S.S.R.

Letter from J. S. Beckington to MLK

Friday, June 10, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

J. S. Beckington, Secretary Treasurer at the Groton School in Massachusetts, encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC.

Religion

Dr. King paraphrases H. G. Wells.

King Calls for Anti-War Referendum

Friday, August 4, 1967
VIETNAM, Michigan (MI), San Francisco, CA, Berkeley, CA, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Cambridge, MA, Wisconsin (WI), Detroit, MI, Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL)

Dr. King announces a nationwide campaign to give Americans an opportunity to vote on the Vietnam War. He explains that the local initiative is a unique and dramatic way for the people to deliver their mandate against the war.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

The Dexter Echo: February 20, 1957

Wednesday, February 20, 1957
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), GHANA, Washington, D.C., PUERTO RICO, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Ohio (OH), New York (NY), New York, NY

The Dexter Echo is the official publication of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. The newsletter mentions Dr. King, who was minister of the church at the time, and Coretta Scott King in articles pertaining to their farewell party and Mrs. King receiving an award.

Royalty Statement for Where Do We Go From Here

Friday, August 4, 1967
New York, NY

Dr. King is receiving a check in the amount of $1048.50 in advance for the German Language edition of Where Do We Go From Here.

Letter from Leonard E. Smith to MLK

Friday, October 6, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC)

Leonard Smith writes to Dr. King concerning a new venture of the National Sharecroppers Fund, which seeks to invest Negro business captial in Southeastern farming areas to benefit the rural poor.

Campaign for a World Constitution Leaflet

New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Illinois (IL), New York (NY), SWITZERLAND, ITALY, NETHERLANDS, INDIA

This pamphlet announces a World Constitutional Convention to be held in Switzerland. Dr. King, who was among the signers of a "Call for a Constitutional Convention," is quoted in the leaflet stating that a world government would lessen tensions.

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Telegram from Charles Webber to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Charles Webber, the AFL-CIO's representative for religious relations, sends this telegram of support to Dr. King during his incarceration.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962
Albany, GA

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS)

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

Friday, February 19, 1965
Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY)

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.