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Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Winfred P. Buckwalter III to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI), VIETNAM

Mr. and Mrs. Buckwater enclose a check for $500.00 that is intended to assist Dr. King in his efforts to stop the Vietnam conflict and help establish world peace.

Letter from Debbie Rubiano to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

People In Action Column: "Can We Ever Repay Them"

Saturday, June 9, 1962
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, New Orleans, LA

This column by Dr. King in the New York Amsterdam News highlights Dr. C.O. Simpkins, leader of the United Christian Movement. Following cross burnings on his front lawn, death threats, and other harassment, both his home and summer house were bombed. The arsonists returned again the next day to ensure the complete destruction of both buildings.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Telegram from Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. to the SCLC Board of Strategy

Sunday, March 31, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Just three days before the assassination, Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. asserts that removing Dr. King from the SCLC would be disastrous.

Letter from MLK to Reverend M.C. Williams

Monday, February 26, 1962
Denver, CO

Dr. King writes to Reverend Williams of New Hope Baptist Church confirming receipt of a recent donation. He expresses gratitude for his continued support in the struggle for freedom.

Letter from Alice B. Bye to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Alice B. Bye requests that Dr. King send information and a picture for her school report.

"Insight and Outlook..Negro Road to Power"

New York, NY, VIETNAM, Cleveland, OH, Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Joseph Kraft discusses the influences of Blacks voting.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

Christianity

Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.

Letter from Richard Dobbins to SCLC

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The Fabulous Two Restaurant invites Coordinating Council of Community Organizations and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to a dinner on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from David Mocine to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CHINA, CUBA, Detroit, MI, Cambridge, MA, New York (NY)

David Mocine writes on the economic disparity in the United States regarding African Americans in relation to their percentage of the population.

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965
New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Santayana

Dr. King records George Santayana’s poem, “Oh World, Thou Choosest Not the Better Part!”

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Montana (MT)

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Letter from Myron A. Hoyt to MLK about Financial and Moral Support

Thursday, August 11, 1966
South Dakota (SD)

In this letter Myron A. Hoyt, of the Synod of South Dakota, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC and comments on Dr. King's reaction to the Black Power Movement.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

Wednesday, October 18, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA)

Tom Offenburger and Stan Levison plan to do a story on the Cleveland project and justify the expenses involved as necessary in the process of field research.

Telegram from Mrs. Adams and Son to MLK

Sunday, September 21, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mrs. Adams and her son wish Dr. King a "speedy recovery."

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Thursday, February 2, 1967
Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Letter from Robert N. Balkind to Andrew Young

New York, NY

This document is a letter of condolence written by the chief executive of a manufacturing company and addressed to Andrew Young, mistakenly listed as head of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). The writer laments Dr. King's assassination and offers a contribution in his "name, honor, and memory."

Letter to Mrs. King from Katherine Hardy

Wednesday, December 1, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Katherine Hardy, a mother of five, faces eviction and desperately writes to Mrs. King for any aid she can provide.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), West Virginia (WV)

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from Glenn Leggett to MLK

President Leggett expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to speak at an upcoming Convocation, for Grinnell College. Leggett informs Dr. King that he is welcomed to rest in his home during his visit at the college.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964
New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), New York, NY

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 19, 1967
New York, NY, INDIA

Ms. Daves informs Ms. McDonald that permission has been given to the High Commission of India's Education Department to publish a Marathi version of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Herman Strase

GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King writes to Mr. Herman Strase expressing his appreciation for an earlier letter that including sentiments to extend justice to all people regardless of race. The Reverend states that he agrees with Strase regarding the demand of Christianity in the expression of compassion and love for all people, no matter their race.

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Chicago, IL, Louisville, KY

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Tore Staav

Monday, April 25, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his sincerest gratitude to Mr. Tore Staav, the editor of Vi Magazine, for his unwavering support and sponsorship during the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Stewart Udall

Thursday, February 22, 1962
Washington, D.C.

On behalf of the SCLC and affiliated organizations, Dr. King requests permission from Stewart Udall, United States Secretary of the Interior, to use the Lincoln Memorial for a Service of Dedication to celebrate the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.