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People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

The Negro is the Most Glaring Evidence of White American's Hypocrisy

Dr. King shares the desire and need of American Negroes to have a social revolution for equality.

Letter From A.H. Emmott to MLK

Thursday, February 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), CANADA, San Francisco, CA, Texas (TX)

A. H. Emmott congratulates Dr. King on winning Time Magazine's "Man of the Year" award and invites him to speak at the Annual Convention of the Union of British Columbia Municipalities in Canada. The UMBC is an organization, which represents the interests of local governments within the Province of British Columbia.

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joani Kalmers to MLK

Saturday, July 15, 1967

Joani Kalmers, a senior at Thiel College, requests information from Dr. King and the SCLC regarding her thesis topic "Christianity and the Negro."

Letter from Morris Kight to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, November 16, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

This document is a letter from Morris Kight to Dr. King in which Kight expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's efforts and offers his assistance in mobilizing individuals for the planned March on Washington February 1968.

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

NORWAY

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

Telegram from Philip A. Randolph to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
New York (NY)

Philip A. Randolph writes Dr. King concerning Negro leaders being invited to discuss problems of the movement on NBC television.

Economic and Social Bill of Rights

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
VIETNAM

The SCLC calls for an economic and social bill of rights to demand the inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for African Americans. It would include the right of every employable citizen to a decent job, the right of every citizen to a minimum income, the right to a decent house in a neighborhood of choice, the right to an adequate education, the right to health care, and the right to full participation in decision-making.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Memorandum from MLK

Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Boston, MA

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

SCLC Voter Registration Program

Sunday, February 1, 1959
Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

The SCLC issues a plan of action to inspire communities in the South to sponsor a year-round voter registration program. The document also includes facts regarding the organization's history and purpose, as well as detailed instructions for conducting an effective voter-registration campaign.

Telegram from NY Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

The NY Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action sends Dr. King well wishes and hopes for a speedy recovery.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Sodd

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Sodd regarding her concerns for fair and just treatment.

Letter from Lyndon B. Johnson to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964
Washington, D.C.

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes Dr. King, thanking him for sending him an advance copy of "Why We Can't Wait."

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Postcard from Dekker Family

NETHERLANDS

The Dekker family of Holland sends its support to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Gwen B. Geiges about Moral Support

Maryland (MD), VIETNAM

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Mrs. Geiges to thank her for her letter expressing support of his work in the movement.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Telegram from Mrs. Adams and Son to MLK

Sunday, September 21, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mrs. Adams and her son wish Dr. King a "speedy recovery."

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, January 9, 1962
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King expresses gratitude for the financial and moral support provided by Sarah Harvey. Dr. King states he is sending a copy of "Stride Toward Freedom" as a token of his appreciation.

Royalty Statement for Casterman Published Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

This royalty statement references royalties earned for a French-language edition of "Strength to Love".

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Monday, August 13, 1962
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

Letter from Iva Sturm to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

The author requests Dr. King to answer questions to solidify the political practices in America before he is to vote democratically.The questions involve concerns surround military, political, and economic issues within the United States. The authors' primary contention is the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Saturday, November 12, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

In this letter, Ms. McDonald encloses biographical sketches to accompany Dr. King's lecture, "The Future of Integration."

War by Executive Decree

NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Minnesota (MN)

Citizens for Governmental Restraint favors the impeachment of President Lyndon Johnson for declaring the war in Vietnam by Executive Order.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. August Schou

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves addresses Mr. Schou's request to have copyright assignment to the speech which Dr King delivered at the University of Oslo, after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She stipulates to Mr. Schou's "first call" but stresses the importance of copyright protocol "after Oslo."

Letter from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Monday, June 28, 1965
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

This letter to Sargent Shriver provides details about the SCLC's 1965 Annual Convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King also extends an invitation for Mr. Shriver to open the conference with an address about poverty, unemployment, and urban migration.