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Letter from Beverly A. Asbury and David W. Stoh to the SCLC

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN

In this letter, dated February 22, 1968, the chaplains at Benton Chapel of Vanderbilt University enclose a check of support to the S.C.L.C.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. King to Mrs. A. B. Cooper & Family

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. and Mrs. King express their regret for being unable to attend the funeral; however, they offer condolences to Mrs. A. B. Cooper and family for the loss of their loved one.

Telegram Plea to Dr. King

Friday, March 29, 1968
California (CA)

An American citizen writes Dr. King pleading for him not to blame whites for all of the misunderstandings in the US.

Prayer Support from Canada

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Atlanta, GA, CANADA

Carl H. Woodbeck, publisher of Africa Speaks, writes a letter of support and prayer to Dr. King.

Susan Julien Offers Service to MLK

New York (NY)

Susan Julien responds to a SCLC circulation letter sent by Dr. King. As a student with no income, Susan offers her service to help further the cause for "democratic change." She has dedicated Saturdays to contribute to the movement and asks if there is a SCLC branch near her home in New York.

God

Dr. King quantifies the capabilities of God's will through Job 42:2 and the affirmation that God is able do everything.

Athanasius, St.

Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian St. Athanasius, identifying him as the defender of the Nicene faith.

Letter from Curtis Harris to Wayne Duncan

Friday, January 1, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Mr. Harris writes to Mr. Duncan informing him that the SCLC has received a petition from the employees at their firm. The SCLC accepted
the petition in order to remove segregation and racial discrimination from society.

Cause, Error and Law

Dr. King quotes from Alfred North Whitehead's The Concept of Nature.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Wednesday, May 11, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald writes Ernest Shaefer on behalf of Dr. King to inform him that Dr. King will write him regarding his invitation in the future. She also asks Mr. Shaefer to inform them of the exact date of the meeting and travel expenses for Dr. King and his associate.

Letter from MLK to Elodia Trevino

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Texas (TX)

Dr. King thanks Elodia Trevino for her support of the Freedom Movement and calls her letter a "contribution to the morale and spirit" of the movement.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Richard Henry Tawney's "Religion and the Rise of Capitalism."

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Monday, March 11, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to members of the Action Committee informing them of the date, time, and duties required for the meeting.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Reverend J. F. McMillan to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
CANADA, North Carolina (NC)

Reverend J. F. McMillan communicates with Reverend Artic Harris to discuss the sponsoring of Mrs. King in a recital for the three Negro Churches in Toronto. They have requested Dr. King to be the principal speaker for their 140th anniversary services. Reverend McMillan informs Dr. King that he is "interested" in the non-violent movement.

Letter from MLK to Esther Thompson

Monday, November 29, 1965
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King informs Mrs. Thompson that the SCLC does not have the resources to help aid her husband's sight. Dr. King recommends that she contact churches in her area for help.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Letter from Marcellus Biot to Coretta Scott King offering Condolences

Monday, April 8, 1968
Los Angeles, CA

Mr. Biot of Los Angeles, CA offers sympathies to Mrs. King behalf of himself and Mother Green.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth

Sunday, October 27, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Reason

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Bible regarding reason.

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Telegram from Dr. Richard Moore to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965
Florida (FL), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. Richard Moore, on behalf of Bethune Cookman College, expresses support for Dr. King during the SCLC Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Telegram from Berry Gordy, Jr. to MLK

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

President of Motown Record Corporation, Berry Gordy, Jr., awaits Dr. King's decision on the album, "The Great March on Washington."

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Helen E. Saum writes Dr. King concerning the issue of drop-outs and its affect on riots and demonstrations.

Message of Thanksgiving to SCLC Staff

Xernona Clayton wishes the SCLC staff a Happy Thanksgiving.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Friday, May 17, 1957
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Detroit, MI, EGYPT

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.