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Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967
Florida (FL)

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

Letter from Ossie Davis to MLK Regarding Malcolm X Assassination

Friday, October 1, 1965
New York (NY)

In this letter, Ossie Davis asserts to Dr. King that it is true that there is one law for whites and another for blacks. Ossie continues by expressing his feelings on Malcolm X's assassination. He closes his letter by asking for Dr. King's signature and monetary donation for an ad.

Letter from H. Ladd Plumley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

H. Ladd Plumley, the Chairman of the National Emergency Committee of the National Council on Crime and Delinquency, writes to Dr. King to inform him that President Jonson asked them to spearhead a citizen-action program to fight crime. In response to these requests, they are planning on holding a conference and hoped the Southern Christian Leadership Conference would appear and be listed as a co-sponsor of the event.

Letter from Roy M. Green to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Green wants Dr. King to read and give an opinion on the three views of the "Black Ghetto" in the October issue of the Atlantic Monthly. Mr. Green states to Dr. King, "Our editors would be most interested in your opinions and comments".

NAACP Presents to the City Commission

Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

This list was presented by the St. Augustine branch of the NAACP to the City Commission.

History

Dr. King references a quote from St. Paul regarding a theological perspective of history.

Preliminary Outline for a Conference on Democratic Planning For America

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE

This preliminary outline features a number of keynote dignitaries and leaders who will address a number of economic, labor, and social justice issues during the three-day Conference on Democratic Planning for America.

Letter from John Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Gettysburg College Chaplain, Mr. Vannorsdall, writes Ms. McDonald concerning the grounds of Dr. King's travel arrangements to speak at the college. He reassures Ms. McDonald of Dr. King's minimal travel time and further discloses his accommodations.

SCLC Resolution on 1966 Civil Rights Act

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

At its Tenth Annual Convention, the SCLC Board adopts a resolution calling upon President Johnson and Congress to reverse a vote on Title IV (Open Housing) of the Civil Rights Act of 1966 that effectively permits discrimination in the sale or rental of private housing. It also faults the Administration for failure to enforce Title VI (Ban on Federal Funds for Segregated Programs and Schools) of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and for inadequate appointment of voter examiners under the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Myles Campbell

Monday, December 23, 1963
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his thanks to Mrs. Myles Campbell for the kind response to his "I Have A Dream" speech during the March on Washington. He explains that prayer is needed for those who are unable to see past their own prejudices and acknowledge everyone as God's children. Dr. King asserts that the federal government is needed to change behaviors in the south and send Mrs. Campbell season's greetings.

Thompson Memorial Chapel Program Featuring MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1961
Massachusetts (MA)

This program highlights Dr. King as guest preacher for Thompson Memorial Chapel's Sunday service.

Dignitaries Attending the Spring Moblization

Presented here is a list of political and social leaders attending a mobilization held in the spring.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Worship

Dr. King compares and contrasts God's place in the Catholic and Protestant church.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from Daniel L. Eckert to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King to express disapproval for Dr.King's support of Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Eckert states that Mr.Powell should be treated as white leaders are treated.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

Boston, MA, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Massachusetts (MA)

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Mr. & Mrs. John Wesley Dobbs Sends Best Wishes for 1960

Atlanta, GA

This card reflects the various dates in which progress has been made in the struggle for equal rights for all. In this card Mr. & Mrs. John Wesley Dobbs also gives their best wishes for 1960.

Mastering Our Fears

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA, Des Moines, IA, Georgia (GA)

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Dr. King Announces Appointments in SCLC Operation Breadbasket

Monday, January 29, 1968
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), Brooklyn, NY, Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH

Dr. King announces two major appointments to the SCLC Operation Breadbasket staff. Reverend Jesse Jackson is named National Director and Reverend Calvin Morris is named Associate Director in Chicago. Operation Breadbasket was formed in 1962 to improve economic conditions in black communities throughout the US.

MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

Wednesday, February 12, 1958
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Saturday, February 19, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Letter from MLK to Members of First Congregational Church Expressing Thanks For Their Contribution

Friday, January 5, 1968
California (CA)

In this letter, Dr. King offer his gratitude to the Fist Congregational Church for its contribution to the S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Rev. Pavel Titera to MLK

Saturday, December 11, 1965
CZECH REPUBLIC, Atlanta, GA

Pavel Titera responds to a letter from Dr. King, in which he expressed his hope for a coming to visit. Titera sends well wishes for Dr. King and his family, and encloses a photograph of his family "as a token of the brotherly love."

Dr. King in his Office at SCLC

Atlanta, GA

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1967
Oregon (OR), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), California (CA)

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.