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Conference on Strengthening the New Politiics

Sunday, November 28, 1965
Washington, D.C.

The Conference on Strengthening the New Politics was formed from a desire to have real constituencies who have control over their elected officials and a concern for local grassroots political development. It is the hope of this conference that the styles of liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement could come together to form a new elective politic.

Permission form sent via Joan Daves to Mr.Gilford to Reprint Material Pertaining to Dr.King

Thursday, October 1, 1964
New York (NY)

This form serves as a way to grant Mr.Gilford permission to reprint the "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in the "Free Government in the Making, 3rd ed."

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
New Hampshire (NH), San Francisco, CA, Michigan (MI), Brooklyn, NY

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Letter from Miss Susan Frehse to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1960
Alabama (AL), New York, NY, Illinois (IL)

Miss Frehse expresses her feelings about Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom,"and how it was hard to convince her classmates of the degree to which the white people in Alabama went to rob Negroes of their rights. She also asks Dr. King to send any available information that will help her classmates understand the reality of racism in the South.

Grand Hotel Reservation for MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Oslo, Norway

This reservation request was sent to Grand Hotel to establish accommodations for Dr. King and his associates during the Nobel Peace Prize ceremonies. One of the drafts of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech was scripted on Grand Hotel stationary.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Monday, May 29, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Hartford, CT, Connecticut (CT)

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

"How To Make History"

Georgia (GA)

Mr. Eisenman acknowledges the irony of how America, which was created after a war of liberation, has now gone against everything it was founded upon.

Slum Building Seized

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This article includes multiple viewpoints regarding Dr. King and the seizure of a slum building in Chicago.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

Saturday, August 13, 1966
CHINA, Indiana (IN)

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

The Voice: A Bulletin of Crozer Theological Seminary

Chester, PA

Dr. King received a copy of this publication from Crozer, which provided alumni updates, religious articles, financial supporters, and current and upcoming seminary events.
Dr. King graduated with honors from Crozer in 1951 as class valedictorian.

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Monday, September 25, 1961
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, October 19, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Benjamin E. Mays that Dr. King will attend the Morehouse Board of Trustees luncheon.

SCLC Commemorative Booklet Support Letter from MLK

Dr. King requests financial support for the development of SCLC's 10th Anniversary Commemorative Booklet.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, Colorado (CO)

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, CANADA, BELGIUM, FRANCE, GERMANY, ITALY, SWITZERLAND, NIGERIA, New York, NY, EGYPT, ISRAEL, Pennsylvania (PA), Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), Connecticut (CT), Denver, CO, Texas (TX)

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962
Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

The Road to Freedom

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

God - II Kings

Dr. King cites II Kings 5:15 as as affirmation of monotheism.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), California (CA)

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.

Letter from Allan B. Schmier to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967
Detroit, MI

Allan Schmier writes to request a meeting with Dr. King during the Central Conference of Teamsters Convention in Detroit, Michigan. Schmier expresses that he was instructed by the acting chairman to make the request and informs him of the purpose of the meeting.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Man (Divided Against Himself)

Referencing the liberal German historian Friedrich Meinecke, Dr. King describes a philosophy on politics as it relates to humanity and one's morals.

Telegram to Dr. King Regarding "Camp In At the United States Senate"

Friday, October 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Lucious President share his opinion about Dr. King's actions at the Senate. "A massive camp in at the United States Senate is contrary to God's teaching. You will not have God on your side."

Letter from J. Ross Flanagan to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King is invited by the Interreligious Committee on Vietnam to speak at a mass meeting in Washington, DC. A handwritten notation indicates that Dr. King cannot accept the invitation.

Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Forgiveness

Dr. King writes on the topic of "forgiveness," as mentioned in Nehemiah 9:17.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King references theological literature regarding the development of Christianity.

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

Friday, February 18, 1966
Ohio (OH)

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.