Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"JORDAN"

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

Thursday, February 8, 1968

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.

Letter from Francis Drake to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Francis Drake sends Dr. King a donation to the SCLC collected on behalf of the Drake Family as a Thanksgiving gift. Drake and his wife are ministers with the United Church of Christ in Massachusetts and support Dr. King's fight for freedom and justice.

Memorandum from MLK

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Rev. King Supports Jackie

This is a press release regarding Jackie Robinson's stand on racial inequality.

Letter from LeRoy Collins of the U.S. Department of Commerce

The Director of Communtiy Relations Service for the U.S. Department of Commerce, LeRoy Collins, offers their partnership and support to the National Assembly on Progress in Eaquality of Opportunity in Housing and the National College Student Conference on Freedom of Residence. Each conference addresses the issue of discrimination; inequalitiesof residence and citizenship at the community level.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publicity Directors of Harper and NAL

Monday, May 18, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dr. King about his availability for the Publicity Directors for Harper and NAL. Joan Daves also reminds him about Stuart Harris and Jay Tower's desire to meet him.

Dialogue: A Search for Reconciliation

Through the power of dialogue, the SCLC seeks to bring diverse cultures together for the purpose of removing barriers and achieving meaningful communication. This brochure outlines six programs of action designed to achieve this goal including group conversation, community dialogue, dialogue of faith, campus dialogue, dialogue round tables, and dialogue with self.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to MLK

Sunday, April 18, 1976

Ernest Shaefer writes Dr. King relaying detailed information regarding Dr. King's travel to Philadelphia International Airport and his speech at Unionville High School in Pennsylvania.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Alan S. Traugott to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mr. Traugott contributes a check to SCLC indicating his grateful endorsement of Dr. King's position on civil rights and peace.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Maurice DeCuir to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this letter, Maurice De Cuir expresses his concern, in regard to race relations, as it pertains to government jobs in helping the economic status of the negro. He then informs Dr. King of the intent, of the Equal Opportunity Commission, to investigate the matter.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

Letter from MLK to Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa

Monday, April 12, 1965

Dr. King thanks James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, for his organization's $25,000 contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current works and beliefs of the SCLC and also stresses the importance of supporters like the Teamsters.

Letter of Support to MLK

Tuesday, January 18, 1966

Alphia Ganaway and Katherine Oakley send a check as a token of appreciation following Dr. King's appearance in South Bend, Indiana three years earlier. A member of the NAACP and other civic organizations, Ganaway led the effort that brought Dr. King to South Bend on October 18th, 1963.

The 13th World Conference against A and H Bombs

Monday, July 31, 1967

The Japan Council against A(tom) and H(ydrogen) Bombs marks the subjects of discussion for their 13th World Conference. The purpose of the conference is to eliminate the usage of nuclear weaponry in U.S. aggression against Vietnam. The Council is also advocating for an end of the Vietnam War and reparations for those harmed by the use of nuclear weapons.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

Telegram from Alfred Duckett to Mrs. King

Friday, October 30, 1964

Alfred Duckett asks Mrs. King to airmail her "program breakdown" to meet a printing deadline.

Excerpt: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" 1967

Sunday, July 2, 1967

The "Quote" publication, from Indianapolis, issued a review of Dr. King's last book. Under the heading, "Book Review in Quotes", a preview of 10 quotations from "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" are listed, in this document. Black power, nonviolence and other subject matters are highlighted in the quotations. Dr. King's book was published and released in 1967.

Letter from Whitey the Honkey to MLK

The author stresses that Dr. King is a part of the race problem. They offer numerous political suggestions and concludes that Dr. King should simply mind his own personal matters.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King quotes Bernard of Clairvaux on the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from Maurice B. Fagan to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mr. Fagan, Executive Director of the Fellowship Commission, requests Dr. King?s suggestion for nominees for the 1967 National Fellowship Award. As a former award recipient, Dr. King's opinion and advice is highly valued.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Why We Can't Wait Book Cover

This draft of Why We Can't Wait contains sketches of a cover, table of contents and edits of the brief description.

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.