Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"JORDAN"

Letter from MLK to Franklin D. Roosevelt III about Contribution

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Roosevelt regarding a contribution he made to the SCLC.

MLK Address to the Congress of Federated Organizations

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS

Dr. King addresses the participants in the COFO Mississippi Summer Freedom Project in 1964. He pledges the full support of the SCLC to aid in their mission to register Negro voters and educate them in the process of political participation. In spite of bombings, arrests, and other forms of intimidation, Dr. King urges the members of COFO to persistently work to eliminate the roadblocks to full citizenship.

Financial Report of SCLC

Friday, May 19, 1967

This document is the SCLC's summary of income and disbursements for the fiscal period of May 15-19, 1967.

Letter from Oakleigh Ross Bush to MLK

Saturday, June 25, 1966
Texas (TX)

Oakleigh Ross Bush discusses the significance of author Joel Candler Harris with Dr. King. Bush also tells Dr. King about a book of Harris' work, which Bush edited. Bush currently is trying to get the book published, but needs a forward written by "an eminent American Negro" in order for publishers to accept the manuscript.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Letter to MLK from Cydrisse Crafton

In this document, Mr. Crafton writes to Dr. King advising not to participate in another "March". He asserts that "Negro's" are marching because they desire to live in a white neighborhood.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Irving J. Block

Monday, May 16, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald requests Rabbi Irving J. Block contact Stanley Levison, Dr. King's attorney in New York City.

News from SCEF Regarding Police Raids

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA, Louisiana (LA)

As a result of a police raid on the offices of the SCEF and its officers, two of their top officers were arrested and their records and papers were seized. The White Citizens Council praised the Louisiana Joint Legislative Committee on Un-American Activities for instigating the raids, while numerous other committees strongly denounced the raids.

Letter from MLK to Thomas R. Jones

Monday, July 29, 1963
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King thanks the Honorable Thomas R. Jones for his financial and moral support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from West Virginia NAACP to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1962
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

William M. Grayson informs Dr. King that he is seeking information regarding his availability to attend a speaking engagement.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, North Carolina (NC), CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CUBA, Birmingham, AL, LIBERIA, Detroit, MI

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

Letter from Judith D. Greenberg to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Judith Greenberg of the Stern College for Women asks Dr. King about material for a report concerning Choice '68.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Tuesday, December 11, 1962
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Urban Strategy Conference and Demonstration Participants

Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

This document lists attendees of the Urban Strategy Conference who also went to a demonstration in Washington, D. C.

Annual Report (Urban America Inc.)

This card references the Poor People's March on Washington of 1968.

To Earn a Living: The Right of Every American

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Kansas (KS), Oregon (OR)

Frederick B. Abramson, the assistant to Clifford Alexander, Jr. sends this copy of President Johnson's "To Earn a Living: the Right of Every American." Alexander, the chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in cooperation with the White House, had this message circulated to the Congress of the United States. President Johnson's message urges Congress to assist with creating jobs and providing access to job training to all Americans regardless of race or socioeconomic status.

Telegram from Patricia E. Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Patricia E. Smith writes Dr. King to congratulate him "on dignity maintained and balanced general gently Christian position."

Letter from Alversia Dunkley to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Dunkley writes Dr. King hoping to receive permission to publish her song, "Man of God," about Dr. King. She also requests contact information for the family of "Miss Viola" to receive permission to publish a poem entitled "Viola."

Letter from Winthrop Steele to MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Winthrop Steele writes Dr. King asserting that he was a supporter and fan of Dr. King and his civil rights doctrine until his recent remarks about the Vietnam War. Steele advises Dr. King to take a sabbatical, reexamine his views, and focus on civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965
Wyoming (WY)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY, Rhode Island (RI), FRANCE, CAMBODIA, LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC, THAILAND, New Jersey (NJ), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, PHILIPPINES, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, NICARAGUA

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

Letter from Frances S. Smith to MLK

Friday, June 5, 1964
New York, NY

Frances Smith, Promotion Director for the Christian journal "Christianity and Crisis," asks Dr. King to write a few sentences regarding the "need for continuing analysis of the civil rights movement from the Christian perspective."

People In Action Column: "Can We Ever Repay Them"

Saturday, June 9, 1962
Louisiana (LA), Shreveport, LA, New Orleans, LA

This column by Dr. King in the New York Amsterdam News highlights Dr. C.O. Simpkins, leader of the United Christian Movement. Following cross burnings on his front lawn, death threats, and other harassment, both his home and summer house were bombed. The arsonists returned again the next day to ensure the complete destruction of both buildings.

Jesus: Humanity and Ethical Character

Dr. King lists verses from the New Testament on Jesus as an ethical character and man as sinner.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Tennessee (TN)

Postcard has a photo entitled "Training Schools for Communists". American Opinion claims the photo was taken at the Highlander Folk School over Labor Day weekend 1957. Dr. King is depicted as one the attendees. Postcard was stamped with an Abraham Lincoln postage stamp (One of the guiding forces to Dr. King and his efforts)

Telegram from Mrs. King to Mr. & Mrs. Silverboard

Thursday, January 9, 1969
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King forwarded this telegram to the Silverboard family of Atlanta, Georgia, in 1969. She wanted to convey sympathy for the death of their father and hoped that the family would find comfort. The spiritual bond of love, according to Mrs. King, is a mechanism that unites families during times of sorrow.

My Dream

Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King writes an article entitled "My Dream," which discusses his campaign to "wage war on the big city ghetto." King visits several slums across the North, and expresses his sentiments regarding the infamous slum conditions.

Board of National Missions Writes the Editors of the Washington Post

Monday, October 24, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

George E. Todd, G. H. Jack Woodard, and Joseph W. Merchant send a letter to the Editors of the Washington Post regarding the Mississippi Action for Progress. They claim the organization is a tool for the destruction of the Child Development Group of Mississippi. Additional allegations are made that MAP was an instrument of the governor and legislature of Mississippi to stall school integration.

Sermon Introductions by MLK

Dr. King frames a series of introductions to sermons that includes such selections as Civilization's Great Need, Life Is What You Make It, and Why Religion?