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Awake America

A poem by Jerry Peace calls for Americans to wake up and address current world issues.

Letter from James Hershey to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Joe T. Denman writes Dr. King on behalf of the Citizens For Progress Organization hoping to sponsor a speaking date in Yakima, Washington. Denman requests that the Reverend forward the date that he will arrive.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Telegram from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

The registrar at Newcastle University thanks Dora McDonald for communicating Dr. King's additional engagement commitments to help in their planning.

Holiday Letter from the Best Family

In this Christmas Card, the Best Family wishes all of their friends and supporters a Merry Christmas.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967

Kenneth Lee extends his gratitude for Dr. King's sponsorship status for the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. Mr. Lee asks Dora McDonald if a meeting can be arranged between himself and Dr. King during his visit to Atlanta, Georgia in August 1967.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

MLK Requests Contributions

Monday, April 1, 1968

Dr. King writes this fundraising letter on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains the campaigns taking place in Washington for the poor and urges immediate financial support for the struggle.

Letter from Evert Svensson to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

Evert Svensson invites Dr. King to speak before the Christian Social Democrats Movement in Gotesborg, Sweden.

Letter from Mr. Stephen Benedict to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

In this letter Mr. Benedict is writing on behalf of Mrs. Ann R. Pierson to notify Dr. King of her contribution to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 17, 1957

Dr. King interprets Jesus' command to "love your enemies" and outlines how to accomplish this goal. He closes this sermon by relating the philosophy of love to the use of nonviolence as a means to overcome oppression.

Brutality in Mississippi

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Friday, May 28, 1965

Laurence Kirkpatrick writes Dr. King on behalf of the World Convention of Churches and Christ expressing their appreciation for Dr. King's acceptance of their invitation and discusses the travel logistics.

Letter from Hiram College Chaplain Harold L. Sawyer to MLK

Tuesday, June 2, 1964

Harold Sawyer, Chaplain of Hiram College, writes Dr. King asking to meet with him while he is in Birmingham or Atlanta. Sawyer also invites Dr. King to speak at the college on February 10, 1965 and asks that Dr. King an hour with him in the Hiram community.

Letter from M.W. Espy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

This letter is requesting that Dr. King sign the First Day Cover of the twenty cent postage stamp honoring Gen. George C. Marshall. It is also noted that two other Nobel Peace Prize winners have signed the Cover as well.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to MLK

During the year of 1967, Sargent Shriver served as Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity and created several community oriented programs. Shriver sends this telegram to Dr. King informing his support. Shriver appreciates King's ability to be forthright on the condemnation of lawless behavior and causes of social unrest. He agrees that "America must quickly develop and support adequate programs to remove these causes."

Angels

Dr. King mentions the concept of patron angels that appears in Daniel 10:13, 20, and 21.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 8, 1967

In this letter, Gitta Badeker, from the office of Joan Daves, informs Dr. King that enclosed are copies of the contract for a Norwegian-language edition of "Where Do We Go from Here. The contract requested for Dr. King to sign and initial.

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

Saturday, September 9, 1967

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.

War

Dr. King quotes the Executive Committee of the World Council of Churches on war in an atomic age being a sin against God, as reported in The Christian Century.

Letter from Edinbugh University to MLK

Sunday, July 31, 1966

Malcom L. Rigkind, the President of Debates at Edinburgh University, renews an invitation for Dr. King to speak in Scotland.

Letter from Harriet C. Kelley to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1962

Ms. Kelley explains to Dr. King why she cannot send a contribution to him. She is on a limited income and already donates both to the NAACP and the United Negro College Fund.

Letter to Melvin Arnold from MLK

Wednesday, December 26, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Dr. King informed him that he has enclosed the final draft of the sixteen sermons to be included, in his second book. He also added that he was in the process of working on the final two sermons to be published in the book.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, August 26, 1964

Dr. King is invited by A. Philip Randolph to attend a birthday party for well known Presbyterian minister, socialist and pacifist Norman Thomas. Randolph requests that Dr. King participate as a sponsor for Thomas' birthday celebration.

Women's International League Conference

This pamphlet provides information regarding the upcoming Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Conference.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Note from Joan Daves to Dr. King

Sunday, September 22, 1963

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with British publishers, Hodder & Stroughton in London for his book "Strength To Love."

The Voice: A Bulletin of Crozer Theological Seminary

Dr. King received a copy of this publication from Crozer, which provided alumni updates, religious articles, financial supporters, and current and upcoming seminary events.
Dr. King graduated with honors from Crozer in 1951 as class valedictorian.

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.