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The Martin Luther King Column (2)

Dr. King discusses the hardwork and efforts of Daisy Bates and her husband, Lucius, on behalf of the civil rights movement.

Telegram from Thomas K. Gilmool and David N. Wice to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967

Mr. Gilmool and Mr. Wice write to confirm the date that Dr. King will be speaking at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding British Edition of Book

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves relays details regarding the British edition of "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" to Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to James Pike

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Dr. James A. Pike that Dr. King will be able to preach for Grace Cathedral's Consecration celebration. She suggests that Dr. Pike lists five possible dates for Dr. King to fulfill this commitment in San Francisco.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Photograph of Hammond Sound Truck Advertising Freedom Concert

This photograph shows the Hammond Sound Truck advertising a Freedom Concert , which will feature Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, Joan Baez and Dr. King.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

SCLC Fundraising Letter

Thursday, February 15, 1968

This 1968 SCLC fundraising letter is a personal appeal from Dr. King. He addresses subjects that would further polarize his supporters, detractors and the country as a whole.

Letter from the Seattle Benefit Guild to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963

The Benefit Guild of Seattle, Washington responds to a previous letter sent by Dr. King, in which Dr. King declined an invitation to make an appearance. The Guild's President and Secretary ask Dr. King to reconsider, so that they can help the SCLC in its work.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Letter of Appreciation from Ben M. Herbster to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

In this letter Ben M. Herbster offers gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of the General Synod of the United Cuhrch of Christ for a message that Dr. King delivered at their meeting.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

Letter from Alfred T. Davies to Coretta Scott King

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

Alfred T. Davies writes Mrs. King thanking her for her performance before the General Assembly. Davies also sends well wishes and support to Dr. and Mrs. King in their endeavors.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

Estimated Budget

This document drafts out SCLC's estimated budget for the 1964-1965 fiscal year.

Letter from Ed Clayton to Martin Gal

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Ed Clayton, Public Relations Director for SCLC, writes Martin Gal, Producer of WMSB TV, to inform him that Dr. King will not be able to make an appearance on his television production because of his focus on the Civil Rights Movement.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Letter from MLK to Herschel McGee about a Corporation

Monday, October 4, 1965

In this letter Dr. King thanks Mr. McGee for his $50.00 check for the starting of a corporation for Negroes, but he lets McGee know that he is unable to concentrate on the devlopment and is returning his check.

Letter from MLK to Robert L. Shirley

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King writes to Robert Shirley to inform him that, if necessary, he will send a member of the SCLC to serve in the interm for Golden Frinks who has been reassigned to another location.

Letter from Benjamin Conklin to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Mr. Conklin writes this letter urging Rev. Abernathy to rethink the decision to proceed with the Peoples March on Washington. He is concerned that with the recent assassination of Dr. King this action will only alienate Congress and the American public. Hence the march could cause more bloodshed.

Invitation from Manitoba New Democratic Party

Thursday, August 19, 1965

B. Swailes, Provincial Secretary of the Manitoba New Democratic Party, extends a speaking invitation to Dr. King to discuss human rights.

Letter from William Perkins to MLK

This letter comes from a military inmate who makes claim to Dr. King of mistreatment and unjust imprisonment. Private William Perkins requests the assistance of Dr. King prior to writing to his congressman to complain of abuse and a lack of proper medical care.

Letter from MLK to James Duckrey

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Dr. King responds to a request to serve as the speaker at Cheyney State College's 1964 Commencement ceremonies. He informs the college's president that he has another commitment on the same day that renders him ineligible to accept the invitation.

Thank-U-Gram from Rev. Phil Stovin to MLK and Harold E. Stassen

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Rev. Phil Stovin extends his support to Harold E. Stassen and Dr. King for organizing Write-In votes in the 1968 Presidential Election.

Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.