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"Jackson, MS"

Invitation from Gene Joseph to MLK

In this note to Dr. King, Gene Joseph says that he is planning a trip to visit the troops in Vietnam. Mr. Joseph then asks Dr. King to take a special collection that will sponsor one of their members for the trip.

Telegram from MLK regarding OEO

Monday, October 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sent this telegram to several members of the House of Representatives urging them to approve a vote on the Office of Economic Opportunity and the War on Poverty.

1964 Election

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

Augustine (Concept of Evil)

Dr. King quotes theologian St. Augustine's "Confessions."

Letter from John Lewis to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, August 31, 1965
Atlanta, GA

John Lewis thanks the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Board of Directors for their five thousand dollar contribution to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

Texas (TX)

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

Tidewater Youth Association Invites MLK to Speak

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA)

Edwin Crocker, president of the Tidewater Youth Association, Inc. in Portsmouth, Virginia informs Dr. King of an interest to present him as their forum speaker. A student initiative, the organization strives to improve social, economic, and spiritual conditions of the Negro. The group hopes Dr. King will consider helping the youth fight for racial justice and equality.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

MEXICO, KENYA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

Letter from Client's Law Firm to MLK

Tuesday, September 20, 1966

Green, Ayers, Swigert, and Cluster write a letter to Dr. King requesting that he speak to Randolph T. Blackwell and encourage him to acknowledge receipt of a poem.

Letter from Ernestie Newby to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Chicago, IL

Ms. Newby asks for assistance in improving her living situation.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965
CANADA

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Draft Letter from MLK to Ms. Giunier

New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to an offer of assistance from a supporter. He directs her to the New York office to jumpstart her work and commends her for her interest in the Freedom Movement.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1967
New York (NY)

In this document, Dr. King receives a royalty check from J. Campe for the use of A Stone of Hope in a work entitled "This Nation." The amount of the check is 13.50.

Letter from Mr. Joseph Mermel to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 18, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter to Mrs. King, Mr. Mermel informs her that a sculptress, Sally Stengel, would like to make a sculpture of Dr. King, given he is one of "two outstanding leaders of the Negro race."

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Memorandum from Dr. King

Tuesday, April 21, 1964
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses this memorandum to the organizers of a "Stall In" at the World's Fair. He advises against the demonstration and only advises it when "persistent attempts at good faith negotiations have completely failed."

Letter from Myron A. Hoyt to MLK about Financial and Moral Support

Thursday, August 11, 1966
South Dakota (SD)

In this letter Myron A. Hoyt, of the Synod of South Dakota, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC and comments on Dr. King's reaction to the Black Power Movement.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD)

Flozella Clark and Agnes Edwards congratulate Dr. King for being awarded the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. They also share what Dr. King's achievement means to them.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA, New Jersey (NJ), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK)

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Letter from New York City Mayor to MLK

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
New York, NY, PUERTO RICO

The Mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay, invites Dr. King to a conference entitled "Puerto Ricans Confront the Problems of the Complex Urban Society: A Design for Change." Panel meetings will expound on twelve subjects ranging from "Education" to the "Administration of Justice."

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines John Dewey's views on Metaphysics. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches, sermons, and writings.

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

Friday, November 3, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, California (CA), Montgomery, AL, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, New York (NY), New York, NY, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

Florida (FL), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), New York (NY)

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA)

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Letter from Ruth Wood to MLK

Virginia (VA)

Ruth Wood of Virginia offers her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their efforts in search of a better society. Mrs. Wood also expresses her pleasure at attending Ebenezer Baptist Church and intends to attend the upcoming SCLC meeting.