Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Jackson, MS"

Telegram from John Moore to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

John Moore questions Dr. King's Vietnam stance by suggesting that it harms the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to Y. Katahira

Friday, June 26, 1964

Joan Daves writes Mr. Katahira asking for an update on an offer by Shinkyo Shuppan Sha for Dr. King's book "Strength To Love." She also asks Katahira to inform Tetsuo Kohmoto that Dr. King's current responsibilities and engagements are restricting him from writing the preface.

Invitation Program to the 1966 Upper Room Citation

The following document is an invitation program from the Rev. Dr. Manning and the Upper Room inviting guests to attend the 1966 Upper Room Citation at the Grand Ballroom, London Hilton Hotel in London, England.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

Monday, March 11, 1968

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Telegram from Carl and Anne Braden to MLK

Monday, October 24, 1960

Carl and Anne Braden offer their support to Dr. King while he remains in the Fulton County Jail.

New York Times: The Case Against Tokenism

Sunday, August 5, 1962

In this article for the New York Times, Dr. King writes of his experiences in an Albany, GA jail. Furthermore, he submits the idea that a delayed response to integration and equality for all is no longer acceptable due to the Negro having a "new sense of somebodiness."

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Letter from Ethel Love to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, May 9, 1961

Ms. Love, program chairman of Warren Business and Professional Women's Club, responds to Ms. McDonald's previous letter regarding Dr. King's availability to speak in Warren, Ohio. Ms. Love ask Ms. McDonald to respond with "an approximate estimate of the likely fee."

Letter from James Shipman to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

James Shipman writes Dr. King to request his presence at the 1st annual meeting for the Education Association for Community-Junior Colleges, as their main speaker. Shipman gives the Reverend option to choose a date convenient for him, a week in either direction from April 20, 1968.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Richard C. Gilman

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Gilman that Dr. King will be able to speak at Occidental College on November 17, 1966.

Housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia

Wednesday, June 24, 1959

This document discusses the critical need of housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia. The role of Atlanta Urban League and the federal Housing Administration in seeking housing for Negroes are discussed and unpublished Commission on Race and Housing reports are exposed that illustrate housing discrimination in Atlanta between 1945 and 1958.

Letter from James D. Wyker to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

James D. Wyker writes this letter to Dr. King and encloses his proposal for direct action against the Vietnam War. Wyker questions if 60% of the population really supports President Johnson's actions in Vietnam, implying that many citizens are just neutral and not wanting to fight the status quo.

Why We Chose Jail Rather Than Bail

Dr. King outlines eight principal reasons why he and others chose "jail rather than bail." One of the reasons was the idea to appeal to the conscience of their opponents.

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Betty D. Richardson to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Betty Richardson reminds Dr. King of his speaking engagement for the American Friends Service Committee 50th Anniversary Dinner.

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

We Salute You!

Thirteen members of Ebenezer Baptist Church are praised for their years of service and role in making the church monumental.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach writes to Dr. King acknowledging his suggestion of using the Greenville Air Force Base to help alleviate the economic problems of Negro families in the Mississippi Delta. Katzenbach states that most of the land is no longer leased by the U.S. government but that Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 would apply to any educational programs.

Ontology

Dr. King poses the ontological question "What is being itself?" and quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Letter from Frederick K. Arrington to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Frederick Arrington of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church writes Dr. King on behalf of the male Ushers asking his permission to use a photo of Dr. King on key tags for a fundraiser.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Monday, November 9, 1964

Robert Hilborn, President of the Empire Club of Canada, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at one of their weekly Thursday luncheons. Hilborn lists previous speakers that have presented before the Club and he hopes Dr. King will be added to that list.

SCLC News Release on Voter Registration

Monday, February 19, 1962

This press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference describes Dr. King's prediction that many African-Americans would register to vote in the upcoming election. Dr. King also remarks that President Kennedy "has not lived up to his civil rights campaign promises."

The Gary Crusader: The World of Books

Saturday, June 24, 1967

This review of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" highlights his examination of the Black Power movement as well as his emphasis on non-violence.

Letter from Friends of the SNCC to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Richard Meier and Lowell Bergman request Dr. King's support for a letter-writing campaign directed at members of the Wisconsin State Senate and Assembly.

Letter from Frederick G. Dutton to MLK Regarding the Oral History Project

Thursday, February 27, 1964

Frederick G. Dutton, by request of Robert Kennedy, contacts Dr. King to discuss the Oral History Project for the John F. Kennedy Library. Mr. Dutton informs Dr. King that Berl Bernhard will be communicating with him to arrange a proper interview time.