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To Fulfill These Rights

Friday, June 1, 2012
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The White House Conference on Civil Rights printed this program in preparation for their June 1966 conference. The theme of this agenda is entitled To Fulfill These Rights.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Ernest J. Chave's "A Functional Approach to Religious Education."

Letter from Fred Becker to MLK in Regard to Speaking Engagements

Monday, January 14, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Fred C. Becker writes to Dr. King about his speaking engagement, lectures, and attendance at special meetings. He requested that Dr. King would send a list of speaking engagements in as advance as possible. The publishers wanted the opportunity to allow the public to be aware of his speaking schedule, so they may be able to purchase his books.

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King defines worship as contemplation on the whole of existence.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), GERMANY, JAPAN, Louisiana (LA)

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Request for MLK To Submit an Article for TV Guide

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA

TV Guide seeks Dr. King's critique of television's positive contributions to life in the U.S., race relations, and negro life.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C.

Rodney Culman requests that Dr. King consent to serve as the Co-Chairman of a potential meeting between Lord Boyd Orr, the Chairman of the New World Food Crisis Committee, and the U.S. President.

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

MLK at his 36th Birthday Celebration

This series of photographs depicts Dr. King celebrating his birthday with family and friends.

Telegram from Francis Lucas to Lucille Banta

Friday, January 17, 1969

Francis Lucas, assistant to Coretta Scott King, informs Lucille Banta of a scheduling conflict. She also requests information about which people "have agreed to sign the cable gram to His Holiness Pope Paul."

Letter from Matthew Killian to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Alabama (AL), FRANCE

Matthew Killian shares his outrage with the unjustified suffering that violence creates. Mr. Killian continues by providing support to Dr. King in an interpretation of a scripture concerning Peter and the woman at the foot of the cross. In closing, Killian wishes blessings upon the Reverend for his efforts to complete his work.

Letter from Richard Carlin to Ralph David Abernathy

Thursday, April 18, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

Carlin offers the use of an original song that he composed after the death of President Kennedy. He finds the lyrics timely for the unfortunate death of Dr. King. He expresses his desire to make a notable contribution to the Fund in memory of Dr. King once he finds a publisher.

Annual Report by MLK

Friday, October 2, 1964
Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, New York (NY), New York, NY, Maryland (MD), California (CA), San Francisco, CA, EGYPT, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Success and Failure Sermon Outline

"Success and Failure" is the title of a sermon given by Dr. King. The handwritten outline, shown here, referenced Philippians 3:13 as the passage of scripture. The date and location, of which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

Message of Thanksgiving to SCLC Staff

Xernona Clayton wishes the SCLC staff a Happy Thanksgiving.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Samuel Proctor

Friday, December 29, 1967
Norfolk, VA

In this telegram to Dr. Samuel Proctor and Family, Dr. King expresses his grief upon hearing of the death of Dr. Proctor's mother.

Chicago Housing Discrimination Complaint

Friday, April 29, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This official complaint to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education references a particular instance of housing discrimination that took place at the Houser Real Estate office.

MLK's Speaker Bureau Contract

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
Rhode Island (RI)

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on October 5, 1966 at the University of Rhode Island.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Birmingham, AL

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Man

Dr. King quotes T. E. Hulme's publication Speculation regarding the nature of man.

Letter from Robert S. Swann to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968
Washington, D.C., GUATEMALA, BRAZIL, PHILIPPINES, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), INDIA, Connecticut (CT)

This letter to Dr. King accompanies the enclosure of a proposal regarding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Co-operative Association. Robert Swann hopes that this proposal can be discussed at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Washington, D.C.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

Atlanta, GA

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.

Letter from Arthur Welch and J.A. Middleton to MLK

Thursday, December 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), GEORGIA

The congregation of Allen Temple A.M.E. Church in Atlanta writes Dr. King to congratulate him for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

Saturday, January 30, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Washington, D.C.

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Letter from John Whyte to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966
New York (NY)

John Whyte, an eighth grader, describes his class's fundraising efforts for the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965
Illinois (IL)

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
MALAYSIA, Atlanta, GA, SINGAPORE

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.