Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Jackson, MS"

Barth

Dr. King notes Swiss theologian Karl Barth's favorite expression on revelation.

Letter to MLK from N.P. Feinsinger

Friday, April 28, 1967
Wisconsin (WI)

In this letter, Feinsinger is consulting Dr. King about the Russell Bull Scholarship and hoping that he can proceed with the selection process.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Sunday, March 11, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King congratulate Reverend Ralph Abernathy on his birthday.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Cleveland, OH

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Letter from Eugene Jackson to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Eugene Jackson expresses his amazement with Dr. King's superb performance during his interview on "Meet the Press."

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins writes Dr. King requesting that Southern Christian Leadership affiliates overflow senators with messages promoting support.

Telegram from Ambassador Ade Martins to MLK

NIGERIA

This telegram was sent to Dr. King and Theodore Brown by N. Ade Martins, the Ambassador of Nigeria. He explains the reaction of Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, the commander in chief of the armed forces, to Dr. King's letter concerning the violence in Nigeria.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rosa A. King

Thursday, July 12, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA

Miss McDonald informs Rosa King that Dr. King will be unable to speak at Central Baptist Church.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Letter from MLK to Herman Strase

GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King writes to Mr. Herman Strase expressing his appreciation for an earlier letter that including sentiments to extend justice to all people regardless of race. The Reverend states that he agrees with Strase regarding the demand of Christianity in the expression of compassion and love for all people, no matter their race.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Rustin requests that Dr. King assents to being a member of the "Institute's Board of Advisory Directors".

Letter From Supporter on Jobs for the Poor

Baltimore, MD, Washington, D.C.

The author and the addressee of this correspondence is unknown. However, the subject matter is related to the SCLC 1968 Poor Peoples Campaign. The author of this letter requested assistance in helping the poor people of Baltimore, Maryland apply for employment.

Religion and Intelligence

Dr. King posits a theory on a battle between "semi-intelligent religion" and "irreligious intelligence."

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Three Stages of Life

This documents contains notes on the three stages of life.

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Dr. King Outlines "If"

Dr. King expounds on the subject "if." He proclaims the word to be primary in the English language.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963
New York (NY)

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Letter from Dr. Eliot Stadler to MLK

Friday, August 14, 1964
Maine (ME)

Dr. Stadler writes Dr. King regarding his inability to join him in his campaign for the "rights of man." He expresses his regret with an enclosure of a financial contribution.

Letter from Rev. A. S. Markham to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964
CANADA

Reverend Markham, Executive Head of the British Methodist Episcopal Church and Executive of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto, informs Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Sholom Synagogue would like to present an award to him. The award honors a person who has contributed to "the needs of humanity in a most outstanding manner."

Memorial Service Flyer - Robert F. Kennedy

Robert F. Kennedy, Attorney General of the United States offered extemporaneous remarks on the death of Dr. King. He wrote, "What we need in the United States...is love and wisdom and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our own country, whether they be white or they be black."

Receipt from the University of Bridgeport to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This is a receipt from James Halsey to Dr. King for a donation to the University of Bridgeport's development fund.

Letter from MLK to William Sibley

Monday, July 13, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Sibley for his contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He also reports the results of a recent fundraising reception, which will be used to establish Dr. Robert Hayling's practice and provide legal defense to participants in the Albany and St. Augustine Movements.

Message of Thanksgiving to SCLC Staff

Xernona Clayton wishes the SCLC staff a Happy Thanksgiving.

Memorandum to Files

Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Wyoming (WY), Atlanta, GA

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965
Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD)

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to MLK and Others Regarding Article

Monday, January 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL

Tom Offenburger sends Dr. King a copy of a newspaper clipping from the Atlanta Constitution in which the writer Bruce Galphin expresses his sentiments regarding the often violent occurrences at nonviolent protests.