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"Johannesburg, South Africa"

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New Hampshire (NH), GERMANY

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

MLK Responds to Questions Pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King responds to a series of questions concerning such topics as his opposition to the Vietnam War, the direction of the Civil Rights Movement, urban riots in Detroit and Newark, and SCLC initiatives catered to the ghettos of the American South.

Letter from some White Citizens of Mississippi to MLK about a Wedding

Wednesday, July 27, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

In this letter Mrs. A.N. Brown and several others express their interest in having Dr. King demonstrate in front of a church at which Lucy Johnson will be getting married.

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Kansas (KS), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Gossett responds to Dr. King's "Showdown for Non-Violence," an article in Look magazine. She compares welfare and social security to subsidies received by the agricultural, railroad and mining industries. She also encloses an editorial from her local paper that mentions Dr. King.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Monday, September 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Telegram from Duncan Wood on behalf of the Oslo Committee, hoping to arrange interviews in Moscow with Dr. King and Father Pire.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Letter from Louise Andrews Sims to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Louise Andrews Sims asks Dr. King to consider providing assistance to the American Friend's Service Committee by setting aside one week for aspeaking engagement in October or November of 1963. Alternate dates could be in January through April of 1964.

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

SCLC Booklet

Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., St. Augustine, FL, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Cleveland, OH, Memphis, TN, VIETNAM, CAMBODIA, South Carolina (SC), Tallahassee, FL

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

Letter from Senator Birch Bayh to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964
Washington, D.C., Indiana (IN)

Indiana Senator Birch Bayh thanks Dr. King for his note supporting Bayh's vote in favor of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Bayh also thanks Dr. King for his concern regarding Bayh and his wife's recent accident. He includes a handwritten postscript in which he mentions the hope of meeting Dr. King in person.

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Letter from Peter White to Dora McDonald Regarding MLK Invitation

Monday, August 23, 1965
CANADA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Peter White, President of the University of Western Ontario Student Council, sends Dora McDonald an invitation for Dr. King to come speak at their institution. He explains that another institution is planning to invite Dr. King to their facility and it would be financially "attractive" and convenient for Dr. King to accept both invitations.

Immortality

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the subject of immortality.

Otline: The Philosophy of Nonviolence

This document outlines Dr. King's speech, "The Philosophy of Nonviolence." He notes both the means and ends of nonviolence and explains that the "highest expression" of non-injury is love. He describes nonviolence as an activism technique and outlines the goals of the philosophy.

Letter from Louis C. Blount to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966
Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

Louis Blount of the Great Lakes Mutual Life Insurance Company in Michigan encloses a check to the SCLC.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967
VIETNAM

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

In this article, written by Robert L. Powers, the author gives his assessment of the book "Why We Can't Wait." Powers provided poignant excerpts from the literature.

Power

Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.

Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

Letter from Wilton Hall Jr to MLK

Friday, January 13, 1967
South Carolina (SC), New York, NY

President of Droke House Publishers, Wilton Hall, Jr., requests copies of Dr. King's speeches, sermons, press conferences, articles, and interviews for the completion of a book volume entitled "The Quotable Martin Luther King."

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

Letter from George W. Baker to MLK

George W. Baker encloses a check in support of Dr. King and his ongoing work towards peace in Vietnam.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from MLK

Sunday, October 19, 1958
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King sends checks and a telephone bill to the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Emma L. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

Emma L. Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church requesting permission to use his name and picture on their key ring project.

"Mrs. Julia Brown To Speak Here On Martin Luther King"

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Virginia (VA)

This article discusses former FBI undercover agent, Julia Brown's plan to expose Dr. King of his affiliation with the Communist party.