The Archive

Search results for:
"Johannesburg, South Africa"

Science and Religion

Dr. King wrote this essay while enrolled at Crozer Theological Seminary, circa 1948-1951. The thrust of Dr. King's stance is that "there never was a conflict between religion and science as such."

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from MLK to Robert Lewis Jr.

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King expounds on Mr. Lewis' experiences and how they directly correlate with the effects of the racial divide. Dr. King further explicates the emotional stress that one faces as a child of both Africa and America.

Letter from Mrs. J. T. Brent to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1963

Mrs. Brent states her support for Dr. King's cause, and asks him to encourage his people not to hate whites. She writes that "hate will destroy you."

SCLC Commemorative Booklet Support Letter from MLK

Dr. King requests financial support for the development of SCLC's 10th Anniversary Commemorative Booklet.

Letter of Support from Dr. May Chinn to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963

On a recent vacation, Dr. Chinn attended a "friends meeting" in a small town outside of Williamsburg, Pennsylvania. Chinn noticed that Dr. King's teachings and spiritual dedication had profoundly influenced that community. He states that Dr. King has inspired people both in that town and around the world, and that he is "everyone's leader."

The SCLC Hall of Fame Dinner of July 1962

Friday, July 20, 1962

This pamphlet is from the Hall of Fame Dinner for Jackie Robinson. It features several ads from organizations supporting the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Arnold Aronson to MLK

Arnold Aronson requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights endorsing the anti-poverty bill.

Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood

Monday, April 8, 1968

This is the itinerary for the Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood to Dr. King's funeral site. A group of bereaved citizens from Northeast Atlanta organized this walk to express human solidarity.

Letter from MLK to Douglas A.C. Davis

Friday, December 13, 1963

Dr. King informs Douglas A. C. Davis that due to his current commitments, he will be unable to accept Davis' invitation to speak at the University of Western Ontario during the current academic year.


Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Principles of Christian Ethics."

Statement on Warnings Issued by U Thant

Sunday, May 21, 1967

On behalf of Secretary General of the United Nations U Thant, this letter serves as a call to action for every government, organization, and organ of world opinion to take a firm stance against American military escalation in the Vietnam conflict.

Telegram from Thomas Kilgore to MLK

Thomas Kilgore, on behalf of Friendship Baptist Church, offers support to Dr. King concerning the downfall of discrimination and segregation.

Ritschl (God)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl’s “The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation.”

Letter to MLK from Guy Dauncey

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Guy Dauncey, Chairman of the Human Rights Committee at Nottingham University, offered this request for Dr. King to visit England, in March of 1968. The content, within the letter, placed emphasis on special events surrounding "Human Rights Year 1968", to begin a progressive Civil and Human Rights movement in England.

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Unity West Program

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Unity West issues this worship program for June 1967.

The Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

This photograph encourages individuals to join the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom to Washington, D.C in an attempt to arouse the conscience of the nation.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Postcard from Ann Flynn to SCLC

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Ann Flynn writes the SCLC requesting the full text of a speech made by Dr. King at an event sponsored by Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Frieda E. Isenberg to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962

Frieda Isenberg collected money from various friends and co-workers to support the cause of freedom in the South. The total contribution given was $22.00.

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

Thursday, April 6, 1967

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Letter from Mrs. Emma L. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965

Emma L. Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church requesting permission to use his name and picture on their key ring project.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Letter from the TATTLER Staff to MLK

Tuesday, November 10, 1964

The TATTLER staff at Atlanta's Drexel Catholic High School congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

High School Seniors in Chicago Request Conversation with MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

Edward Foreman, on behalf of the senior class at J.H. Bowen High School in Chicago, Illinois, invites Dr. King to lead a discussion regarding the issues that brought about Dr. King's adventure to Chicago.

Letters from Irwin G. Perkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Irwin Perkins, Minister of Donlands United Church, invites Dr. King to visit Toronto for their church's anniversary in the month of October. Perkins expresses their enjoyment of Mrs. King's inspirational visit the previous month and states that his expenses will be covered if he is able to attend.

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Mr. Charles Merrill, Headmaster of the Commonwealth School in Boston, MA, requests that Dr. King support Mr. Danilo Dolci's candidacy for the Nobel Peace Prize that year