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Crusade for Citizenship Memorandum

Tuesday, February 4, 1958

Dr. King creates an outline that entails the purpose and goals for the Crusade for Citizenship. Dr. King will deliver this information in a mass meeting to clarify the aims of the SCLC's "crusade." The dual purpose for this sector of the SCLC is to increase the number of Negro voters and to liberate all Southerners. Dr. King further elaborates on the intricacies of the movement.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Hiram College Chaplain Harold L. Sawyer to MLK

Tuesday, June 2, 1964

Harold Sawyer, Chaplain of Hiram College, writes Dr. King asking to meet with him while he is in Birmingham or Atlanta. Sawyer also invites Dr. King to speak at the college on February 10, 1965 and asks that Dr. King an hour with him in the Hiram community.

The Purpose of Religion

Dr. King argues that the purpose of religion is not to "perpetuate a dogma," but to create witnesses to the power of God. He also considers whether salvation comes from upholding a particular creed or whether it comes from an individual reconciling with God.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

People in Action: Unknown Heroes

Thursday, May 10, 1962

This New York Amsterdam News article by Dr. King introduces two unknown heroes of the Civil Rights Movement in the South, Esau Jenkins and Billy Fleming. Jenkins taught the riders on his buses how to read and write so they could qualify to vote. This idea was the basis for SCLC's Citizenship School program. Fleming, an undertaker in Clarendon County, South Carolina, was a leader in the Briggs v. Elliott school desegregation lawsuit, the earliest of five suits to be combined in the US Supreme Court?s landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision.

The Christian Church and Communist Atheism

Helmut Gollwitzer, a Protestant theologian, completes this body of work entitled "The Christian Church and Communist Atheism." The author states that, "socialists may be Christians, but Christians must be socialists."

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King

This royalty statement for the period of January 1, 1964 to December 31, 1964 is for the Dutch-language edition of "Strength to Love," published by Van Loghum Slaterus.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Gaulan

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

This is a letter from Dr. King to Joseph Gaulan to thank him for the letter of support while he was in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from Mrs. Edward G. Rolfe to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

The wife of a wrongfully accused man, Edward G. Rolfe, pleads for Dr. King to hear her story of discrimination.

Letter from Harper and Row, Inc to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

In this letter, Laura Paull, from the Religious Books Department of Harper and Row, Publishers Inc., requests Dr. King's opinion on the publication "In the End God" by John A. T. Robinson.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

SCLC Annual Meeting Program

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

This program outlines an annual meeting for the SCLC. The guest list includes Hall of Fame player Jackie Robinson, Septima Clark and Joseph E. Lowery.

Letter from Marshall Breland to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Marshall Breland, a student from P.S. 200, requests information from Dr. King for the purposes of a school related assignment. Breland deems Dr. King "The Non-Violent Crusader".


Dr. King quotes British historian Arnold J. Toynbee from his work "A Study of History."

War by Executive Decree

Citizens for Governmental Restraint favors the impeachment of President Lyndon Johnson for declaring the war in Vietnam by Executive Order.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.


Dr. King quotes and comments on Proverbs 2:6, saying that wisdom is a supreme virtue for the author of Proverbs and involves moral character and knowledge.

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Friday, May 19, 1967

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

Letter from MLK to Paul Madsen

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. King informs Reverend Paul O. Madsen that he does not have availability to work for the Home Missions Societies of the American Baptist Convention because he is very busy with the civil rights struggle.

Letter from MLK to U Thant

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks U Thant, the Secretary General of the United Nations, for a luncheon in Oslo, and wishes him well as he recovers from an illness.

Letter from MLK to Victoria Gist

Dr. King apologizes for a belated reply and says he hopes the State Youth Congress meeting was successful. King was invited to be banquet speaker.

Letter from James A. Eanes to MLK

Monday, November 29, 1965

James Eanes, Chairman of the Fundraising Committee at the West Virginia Institute of Technology, invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker at the kick-off dinner for their "March of Dollars to Help Tech Scholars" program. The program raises money for the government to match for the National Defense Student Loan program.

Letter from Mrs. Eva Claytor to MLK

Wednesday, December 14, 1966

In this letter Mrs. Claytor of New York, NY, identifies herself as an "admirer" and is writing to inform Dr. King that his proposed book title "Where Do We Go From Here [sic]" conflicts with a previously published and copyrighted work of the same title in England.

Memorial Service Flyer - Robert F. Kennedy

Robert F. Kennedy, Attorney General of the United States offered extemporaneous remarks on the death of Dr. King. He wrote, "What we need in the United love and wisdom and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our own country, whether they be white or they be black."