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Sin

Dr. King notes Niebuhr's definition of sin as the unwillingness to acknowledge the effect God has on one's existence.

A Manual for Direct Action

Chicago, IL

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967
New York (NY)

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.

Telegram from MLK to Amsterdam News

New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King delivers an informative telegram to James Hicks, editor of Amsterdam News, regarding the current SCLC initiative to launch a civil rights campaign in Chicago, Illinois. The movement will direct its efforts towards school integration and eradicating the social ills that plague the Northern ghettos. Dr. King asserts "if the problems of Chicago, the Nation's second largest city, can be solved, they can be solved everywhere."

Letter from James K. Mbuguah from MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1962
KENYA

James Mbuguah is a young boy from Kenya who has been accepted into John Hopkins University. James is contacting Dr. King because he does not have the finances to attend the school and would like to receive assistance.

Telgram From Denmark to Dr.King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
DENMARK, Atlanta, GA

A representative of the Danish Jewish Community offers Dr. King the "Ben Adam Honorary Award". He invites Dr. King to the event held December 5th, 1964.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967
VIETNAM, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., EGYPT, GERMANY, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, CUBA

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from C. B. Kelley to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
Ohio (OH), Massachusetts (MA), Cincinnati, OH, VIETNAM

C. B. Kelley shares his disagreement with Dr. King's statements regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Marian Hargrave to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Ms. Hargrave offers her support for Dr. King and his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. She also discusses the religious aspects of the struggle, which she feels give it a deeper meaning.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and future Congressmen, writes to Dr. King to share his concerns regarding the need for an improved relationship between SNCC and SCLC.

Schedule of Buses for Pacem in Terris Participants and their Guests

Geneva, Switzerland

This schedule of bus routes is intended for Pacem in Terris participants and their guests. Trips include travel to Convocation sessions and a concert held at Victoria Hall.

Memo from Weston Hare to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Richmond, VA

Weston Hare offers support to Dr. King in regards to SCLC's training program for Negro ministers in urban leadership. The Ford Foundation issued a grant to SCLC to fund the program.

William James

Dr. King briefly discusses philosopher William James and his lectures entitled "The Variety of Religious Experience."

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), LIBERIA

Dr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes each of the members of the board to seek an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters for Dr. J. Curtis Nixon. Nixon was a lawyer and famous labor mediator.

Letter to Representatives of Harper & Row and N.A.L from Joan Daves Regarding "Why We Cant Wait"

Tuesday, April 14, 1964
Chicago, IL

This memo serves to inform all parties involved with the publishing of "Why We Can't Wait" of the arranged prepublication agreements made by Mrs. Joan Daves.

List of Negro Inventors

This list of Negro American inventors includes various individuals such as Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, who performed the first successful open heart surgery, and W.A. Lavalette, who invented the printing press.

Invitation to Dinner for General Dwight D. Eisenhower

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King received this formal invitation to attend and be seated on the dais at The Family of Man Award Dinner in honor of General Dwight D. Eisenhower, at the Hotel Astor on 10/28/64.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966
Chicago, IL

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Letter from Dean Florio to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Dean Florio sends condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Richard Russell

Monday, December 4, 1967
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King conveys his well wishes to Mr. Russell for a speedy recovery.

Numbers

Dr. King records class notes from the biblical Book of Numbers regarding ethics, knowledge, and sin.

Crozer Theological Seminary Comprehensive Examinations

Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The following is a detailed overview of comprehensive examinations at the Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Exams are both written and oral. "The purpose of the oral examination is to discover the student's ability to think in an integrative manner over all the areas of the theological education."

MLK - Notes on Ranke

Dr. King discusses history and the power of man having " made voyages, extended commerce, founded cities, and established great universities."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964
GERMANY

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from Dore Schary

Wednesday, January 6, 1965
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

In this letter, Dore Schary invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 52nd annual dinner of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith at which President Lyndon B. Johnson will receive the America's Democratic Legacy Award.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964
Atlanta, GA, NETHERLANDS

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

American Influence in Vietnam

New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. John C. Bennett, President of the Union Theological Seminary, expresses his political beliefs concerning the presence of American military in Vietnam.