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Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

An Evaluation of the Racial Problems of Chicago

Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

The writer of this document examines the intended efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC in addressing the issues of poor urban conditions, unemployment, unequal education and lack of Negro political involvement in the City of Chicago.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from Mrs. Bonnie Cohen to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Bonnie Cohen, a senior at Eastern Michigan University, writes to Rev. Abernathy requesting his thoughts on the problem of "crime in the streets."

Calvin Kytle to Head Information Center for Urban America

Washington, D.C., New York, NY, GEORGIA

This press release revelas that Calvin Kytle will head a new national information center for Urban American, Inc.

Hruska Says Capital...

Washington, D.C.

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise

Friday, October 4, 1963
Illinois (IL), Birmingham, AL

Dora McDonald writes to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise to inform them of a transfer of funds to the intended recipient.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York, NY

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Letter from Hubert Reaves to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Michigan (MI)

As an inmate in Jackson, Michigan, Hubert Reaves writes Dr. King to express his interest in the SCLC, and inform him of his future education in ministry at the Detroit Bible College. Mr. Reaves also includes a letter to Mr. Goodall inquiring about his inmate account and the sending of his letters.

Letter from Anthony Thompson to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968
Kansas (KS)

Anthony Thompson, of Bethany College in Kansas, requests that Dr. King send information concerning his political and world views. Thompson intends to include the information in a program called Choice '68 on campus.

Cardinal Virtues

Dr. King defines "cardinal virtues" and then lists those held by the Greeks and Christians.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
New York, NY

Mr. Hillyer and his children Nitra, Linda, and Jonathan send a donation of thirty-five dollars to Dr. King, in memory of the late Mrs. Hillyer.

Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, July 2, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Letter from Nathan Green to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Here, Nathan Green requests to meet with Rev. Abernathy to discuss a plan that Green believes will be of "tremendous value" to their cause.

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Letter from Elisabeth T. Babcock to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 25, 1965
New York (NY)

Elisabeth T. Babcock writes Dora McDonald regarding Dr. King's schedule around May 8, 1965. Babcock desires Dr. King to address high school students "in support of Long Island." Babcock states that maybe Dr. King can help the children display their courage.


Dr. King outlines principles of Hegel's philosophy regarding rationality and reality.

Letter from James T. Hale to MLK

Tuesday, September 22, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA

Morehouse alumnus James T. Hale invites Dr. King to speak to the community in Clarksville, Tennessee. He expresses how the majority of the community has not had the opportunity to hear Dr. King speak and asks that Dr. King provide a possible date.

Letter from Charles Harris to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

Pastor Charles Harris of the Calvary Baptist Church encloses a check to Dr. King in support of the Selma to Montgomery March. He regrets his inability to participate in the march due to his wife's illness.

Invoice-"Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 16, 1967
New York (NY)

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King, for the shipment of six copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

Tuesday, July 23, 1963
Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, New York (NY), Ohio (OH), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), CUBA, HUNGARY

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960
Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.


Dr. King cites theologian Emil Brunner regarding man's knowledge of God.

A Minority of One

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.