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"Kentucky (KY)"

Tillch's Significance

Dr. King records Rhode Island Senator Theodore Greene's opinion that German-American theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich is "the most enlightening and therapeutic theologian of our time."

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

Friday, December 2, 1966
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C.

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

March on Washington Record

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

Entitled "We Shall Overcome!" this document advertises the selling of the "authorized record" of the 1963 March on Washington. The record includes "inspiring songs of freedom" and speeches from the historical march.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Letter from Marilyn Thomburgh to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Marilyn Thomburgh writes Dr. King addressing the issue of polluted water in the US and asks why there is nothing done about this matter.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Inquiring about Dr.King's Professional Tour

Tuesday, February 25, 1964
New York, NY

Mrs.Daves has requested that Mrs.McDonald send information pertaining to Dr.King's lectures and personal appearances to her office as soon as possible.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

Letter from Pastor F. Peter Sabey to MLK

Monday, April 26, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Pastor F. Peter Sabey of the Lafayette College Church invites Dr. King to give a sermon at the church. Sabey states that he will cover the expenses for Dr. King and give an honorarium if he accepts.

Christ

Dr. King quotes a passage from Adolf Harnack's "What Is Christianity?" in which Harnack contrasts Plato's focus on the wise with that of Jesus Christ, who finds value in every human.

10th Annual SCLC Convention Program

This document is a flyer for the 10th annual convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), GERMANY

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
New York, NY, NIGERIA, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

Washington, D.C.

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Man

Dr. King notes the subject of man, quoting Algernon Charles Swinburne's "The Hymn of Man."

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Sidney Anger

Monday, March 25, 1968
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Sidney Anger for his contribution of $100 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King continues to share the current work of the organization and the importance of financial support in order to ensure sustainability.

The Third Level of Ontological Concepts

Dr. King writes notes regarding the third level of ontological concepts, which "expresses the characteristics of being which are conditions of existence."

Social Gospel

New York (NY)

Dr. King defines social gospel with a quotation from Shailer Mathews and G. B. Smith's "A Dictionary of Religion and Ethics."

King Seizure

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article reports on the seizure of a Chicago property by Dr. King.

Letter from Shirley Katzander to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
New York, NY

Shirley Katzander, Director of Promotion for "The Reporter," requests Dr. King's commentary on an article written by Meg Greenfield titled "What is Racial Balance in the Schools?"

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Letter from Edward Gulick to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962
Massachusetts (MA)

Edward Gulick of Wellesley College writes Dr. King, expressing his appreciation and admiration for the work Dr. King has done in Massachusetts and elsewhere.

God's Relation to the World

Dr. King outlines the sermon "God's Relation to the World." Dr. King breaks down the sermon into three themes: God's creation of the world, His conservation of the world, and His transformation of the world.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Arvella Gray

Monday, June 3, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dora McDonald acknowledges receipt of items sent by Arvella Gray. She ensures Mr. Gray that Dr. King will be made aware of the gifts upon his return from Birmingham.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

Telegram from SCLC to Ella Mae Moton

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Selma, AL

Staff of the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program inform Ella Mae Moton that her expenses for the trip to Georgia will be taken care of.

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The Morehouse Board of Trustees sends Dr. King a letter to accept the Committee's recommendation to elect Dr. Hugh Gloster as the next president of Morehouse College.

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963
Iowa (IA)

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Letter Regarding the Distribution of Pilgrimage Folders

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Sandy F. Ray thanks Andrew Young for speaking to his parishioners. Reverend Ray also requests information regarding the distribution of the Pilgrimage Folders, in preparation for the mass pilgrimage Dr. King was planning to lead to Israel and Jordan.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), HUNGARY

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.