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Society

Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

Letter from Edward P. Blair to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Mrs. Edward P. Blair, Executive Secretary for the Evanston Council of Churches, informs Dr. King that two enclosed checks totaling $298.78 is a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Joe Cheru to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Joe Cheru advises Dr. King to adopt a technique called "organized massive write-in." Using this method, he suggested that Dr. King could channel greater support from people who could not participate directly by being physically present for demonstrations.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Smock

Dr. King apologizes for responding to Mrs. Smock's letter over a year late, but extends gratitude for the invitation to her art exhibition. Dr. King affirms that if he is in Atlanta during the time of her exhibition he and Coretta will attend.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Religious Experience

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and G. K. Chesterton on the need for trying the Christian experiment to have the Christian experience.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Telegram from the Church of Sweden to MLK

Tuesday, March 3, 1964

The Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to take part in a great church event in the fall of 1964. The church assures Dr. King that all expenses will be paid for his travel and the archbishop of Sweden will provide him with the official invitation letter.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

The American Dream Outline

Dr. King outlines his "American Dream" speech on the back of letterhead from the Bellevue Stafford hotel. Dr. King writes about a "massive action program" to address injustice in America.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee Democratic National Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a plea to the Democratic National Committee to provide a delegate from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party so that there may be equal representation within the state. Dr. King's feels that by providing a delegate it may discontinue the prevention of political participation of African Americans in Mississippi.

Letter from Leon Hall to William Rutherford

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Leon Hall writes William Rutherford requesting additional per diem fees for SCLC's Mississippi field staff.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Letter from Flournoy Coles to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Flournoy Coles invites Dr. King to come to Fisk University and lead a session of the Honors Program.

God

Here, Dr. King writes a theoretical view of the existence of God.

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edith Segal

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dora McDonald communicates to Edith Segal that she has be referred to the letter addressed originally to Bernard Lee. Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Segal that Dr. King is unable to comment on her book due to his consistent traveling endeavors in the South for the Civil Rights Movement.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

Letter from Helen G. Frumin to Coretta Scott King

Monday, December 5, 1966

Mrs. Frumin writes Mrs. King to request sponsorship for the Committee of Responsibility. She includes a list of others who have agreed to sponsor the organization among which is Dr. Benjamin Spock, affluent pediatrician and anti-war activist, and other prestigious figures.

Letter from Barnes and Smith to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962

Account Executive M. J. Orman proposes that Dr. King use a reflective decal manufactured by his company as a fundraising item.

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Mr. J.G. Anoma

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Anoma for his monetary contribution to the SCLC. In addition, he praises Mr. Anoma for his poem entitled "Black Chicago". The poem addresses the current struggle faced by many "dark-skinned Americans" and reaffirms the aim of the SCLC-Chicago campaign.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller writes Dr. King to tell him how much of a "privilege" it was to see him and meet Mrs. King at the Spelman College luncheon. He alludes to "tragic circumstances" surrounding his visit, but nonetheless conveys appreciation for the opportunity to be in attendance and meet with those working "for the cause of better understanding."

Letter from MLK to T. C. Johnson

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. T. C. Johnson for her contribution to the SCLC and encloses an official receipt for her gift. King states, "Without your moral support we would be caught in a dungeon of despair."

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.