Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"LIBERIA"

Letter from Victor Lebow to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

Victor Lebow, owner of a marketing firm, writes Dr. King to propose a business venture that could benefit the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the African American community. The venture could provide income for the organization and aid in employing African Americans.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Adlai Stevenson of the United Nations informs Dr. King that their meeting will have to be rescheduled due to his duties as UN Security Council President. Stevenson wishes to converse with Dr. King about issues relating to the continent of Africa.

Invitation from Douglas Davis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Douglas A. C. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at the University of Western Ontario's School of Business Administration. He explains that Dr. King's visit will be one of great pleasure and honor.

Letter from William Harris Jr and Others to MLK

Wednesday, October 2, 1963

The DeMolay Cosistory, No.1 convey their sympathies for the four girls killed in a church bombing. The organization pledges to take action to demand rights and equality for all.

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Letter from Pamela Buckler to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966

Ms. Buckler writes Dr. King requesting SCLC literature on Negro politics for her sociology paper.

Letter from Pastor H. Edward Whitaker to MLK

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Whitaker, a former classmate at Crozer Theological Seminary, request's Dr. King's advice concerning a new ministry position at a Southern State College.

Letter from MLK to Broadway United about a Contribution

Monday, January 15, 1968

In this letter Dr. Offers his gratitude to the Broadway United for a contribution. Dr. King also comments on how such funds are used and why such funds are needed.

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from Edna Smith to Ralph Helstein

Thursday, January 26, 1967

In this letter, Edna Smith writes to Mr. Helstein regarding Dorothy Ashford's participation in the Civil Rights Movement. Ashford is a student at Clemson University, who previously worked with the South Carolina Council on Human Relations.

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

Letter from MLK to Griffin R. Simmons

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Dr. King informs Mr. Simmons, President of the Consolidate Association, that he will not be able to travel to New York to accept an award from the association due to the struggle in the South.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

Letter from MLK to Fredrik Schjander

Wednesday, October 6, 1965

Dr. King responds to a survey of five questions from Fredrik Schjander regarding the world's chances for peace. Dr. King believes the prospects for world peace have actually declined since he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, due to conflicts in areas such as Kashmir and Vietnam. Dr. King does write that the growing role of the United Nations as a global mediator is an encouraging sign.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Letter from MLK to the McKeesport, Pennsylvania NAACP

Tuesday, March 27, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Cardinal Virtues

Dr. King defines "cardinal virtues" and then lists those held by the Greeks and Christians.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "A Stride to Freedom"

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In this letter, J. Campe encloses the German royalties, received from J.G. Onken, for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" German language edition.

Letter from M. Carl Holman to MLK Regarding Event Invitation

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

Mr. Holman informs Dr. King he will soon receive a formal invitation to attend the Commission's National Conference on Race and Education in Washington, D.C. Mr. Holman is sending this advance notice with the hope Dr. King can fit the conference into his schedule.

Memorandum to Files

A memorandum to file was written to explain how the SCLC will proceed in a pending legal case. In the case, the plaintiff has sought compensation for a car accident in which an alleged employee of the SCLC, Major Johns, was the driver at fault. A joint decision was issued against both parties. However, the decision was rendered in Louisiana and the SCLC claims that the court lacks jurisdiction. The memorandum concludes with why the SCLC will wait to assert its claim until the plaintiff brings suit to a court in Georgia.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.