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"LIBERIA"

Letter from MLK to Frank Church

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Frank Church, a United States Senator from Idaho, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

War on Poverty

Dr. King calls for the end of poverty in the African American community through the mobilization of interracial coalitions. He states that the negative effects of discriminatory laws will not cease to end by the enforcement of the Civil Rights Bill, nor will it cease if the laws were immediately repealed, but only by the building of alliances among the black and white communities will these issues be eliminated.

Letter from a Concerned Christian to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1958

This letter penned by "Concerned Christian" informs Dr. King of a change in the course of the Civil Rights Movement. The "Concerned Christian" makes note of the increased amount of violence in the city of Baltimore and reprimands Dr. King's "reduced faith in God."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles H. Smith

Tuesday, January 30, 1962

Dr. King regrettably informs Rev. Charles Smith that he will not be unable to make an appearance at the First Baptist Church in West Virginia. Due to Dr. King's schedule and commitments to his home church, he finds it difficult to accept any invitations for the next several months.

Letter from Neil Sullivan to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

In this letter, Superintendent of Schools Neil Sullivan writes about the complete integration of the Berkeley County Public Schools.

Ethics

Dr. King records some notes on ethics and the book of Micah.

God: Attributes, Relation to World et.

Dr. King references numerous biblical scriptures on the attributes of God.

March 1968 Dr. Marin Luther King Jr. drafts a letter of gratitude for Richard Gardner.

Sunday, March 24, 1968

Dr. King drafted a letter of gratitudefor Richard Gardner. Mr. Gardner contibuted a donation of one hundred dollars to the SCLC. Dr. King also, outlines some of the programs in which the SCLC engages in as well as it's principles of non-violence.

End the War in Vietnam

The bumper sticker reflects the sentiments of many Americans during the Vietnam War. It states "End the War in Vietnam: BRING THE TROOPS HOME NOW!"

Philosophy of History

Dr. King writes about the philosophy of history according to Isaiah 41: 1-7.

Program for Mass Meeting with MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Dr. King spoke at the Scott High School Field House in Toledo. Mayor John W. Potter opened the program with an official welcome to the city and Rev. Robert Culp welcomed the prticipants on behalf of the Toledo Chapter of the NAACP. Rev. B. F. Wright, the President of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Toledo and Vicinity, gave the benediction.

Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

Monday, February 5, 1968

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

Financial Document-Receipt from Ramparts Magazine

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

This note references a check sent to Dr. King by Ramparts Magazine for monies received for the use of his Riverside Church Speech.

Letter from Rhoda Dorsey to MLK

Thursday, May 21, 1964

Rhoda Dorsey, Dean and Associate Professor of History at Goucher College, informs Dr. King that they have included "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" on the freshman class reading list.

Telegram from MLK to Sheraton Lincoln Hotel

Monday, October 9, 1967

Dr. King makes a reservation with the Sheraton Lincoln Hotel in Texas.

Itinerary for MLK with Handwritten Notes

This itinerary from 1964 details Dr. King's traveling schedule and contains his handwritten notes with regard to discovering one's purpose in life.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Book Autographs

Friday, August 28, 1964

With this letter Joan Daves sends three copies of "Why We Cant Wait" to Ms. McDonald requesting them to be autographed by Dr. King and returned to the specified recipients.

Telegram from Charles Evers to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This telegram, from board members of MAP, expresses their dissatisfaction with Dr. King's comments regarding refunding efforts of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Letter of Condolence to Mrs. King and Children from Nagarajan and Family

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Dr. G. Nagarajan, a professor at Allen University in South Carolina, sent Mrs. King this letter to express sympathy following the death of Dr. King. The content of the letter compared Dr. King's philosophy and cause to Gandhi.

America

Dr. King quotes a statement from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the country's "historic situation in which the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Iwanabe

In this draft letter to Mr. Iwanabe, Dr. King explains his methods, understanding and goals pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 16, 1967

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to an upcoming meeting of the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

Letter from Susan Drubin to SCLC

Ms. Drubin desires to make a monetary contribution to the SCLC to continue the work of Dr. King. As such, she writes to obtain more information about the procedures for contributing a percentage of her annual salary. She finalizes her letter by noting that she is taking a speech course in which she hopes to use the information sent to her to draft a speech.

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965

The secretary of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees writes to Dr. King, enclosing the minutes of their meeting of April 10, 1965.

Exam for Bible 252 at Morehouse

This is an exam for Dr. King's Bible course, which lasted from September 1946 to May 1947, at Morehouse College. Dr. George D. Kelsey was the professor. Dr. King's notes are in the margins.

Letter from Bryan Fulks to MLK

Tuesday, March 20, 1962

Bryan Fulks writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his diligent work during the fight for social justice and human dignity. Fulks also mentions how elated he was when the editor of the "London Humanist" chose to enrich his article including a pictorial illustration of Dr. King riding through the southern region of the United States.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Leon H. Sullivan

Wednesday, October 31, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Leon Sullivan for visiting Atlanta and delivering a powerful message. Dr. King had asked Rev. Sullivan to come to Atlanta and meet with local ministers to discuss the selective patronage program Sullivan developed in Philadelphia. This program became the model for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

People in Action: The Solid Wall Cracks

Friday, March 22, 1963

In this draft of an article for the April 13, 1963 New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the cracks in the wall of segregation in Albany, GA: first the city’s closure of segregated public facilities to avoid protests by the Albany Movement, then the repeal of segregation from the city’s code.