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"LIBERIA"

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Letter from Klaus Schwarze to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
GERMANY, Missouri (MO)

Mr. Schwarze requests that an autograph be sent to him in Germany for his collection from Dr. King.

Letter from Dick Hall to MLK

Chicago, IL

Dick Hall, Group Leader with the Chicago area Salvation Army, writes Dr. King to inform him of a program the daycare center conducts that caters to children in the surrounding area. Mr. Hill also requests Dr. King's autograph for a project display the children in the program are constructing.

The Alberton Family Sends Condolence Offerings

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

The Albertson family sends to Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Young their condolences for Dr. King's death in the form of contribution and encouraging words.

Tritheism

Dr. King notes the definition of tritheism.

MLK Address to a North Carolina Branch of the NAACP

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses a public meeting of Charlotte, North Carolina's NAACP branch. He lists five actions the Negro can do to assist America with realizing the dream. The Negro must challenge the system of segregation, make efforts to gain ballots, and sacrifice to achieve freedom.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Maryland (MD)

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Blandena Lee Kossodo

Tuesday, November 29, 1966
SWITZERLAND, Geneva, Switzerland

Dora McDonald writes Blandena Lee Kossodo expressing that Dr. King is honored to have been offered to write the introduction to her book. However, Dr. King has to decline because he is writing his own book and for other publications.

Letter from Faye Drake to MLK

Friday, January 29, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

Fay Drake of the Youth Department of the St. John Evangelist Baptist Church invites Dr. King to the church's Negro History Week celebration.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.

Bold Design for a New South

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

A Call to Vietnam Week

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

Capitalism

Dr. King references Karl Marx's thoughts on capitalism.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA

John Lewis relays his appreciation for the advanced copy of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Religious Education

Dr. King discusses the topic of religious education. King asserts that religious education should not become a substitute for personal evangelism and that "religious instruction without conversion is comparatively ineffective."

Letter from MLK to Gene Exman

Tuesday, March 19, 1963
New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King responds to Eugene Exman's invitation to participate in the weekend seminar. Dr. King regrettably informs Exman that he will be unable to attend because he and his wife will be in Europe during that time.

Letter from Reginald Holmes to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Chicago, IL

Reginald Holmes, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King for information about his church and his role as spiritual leader.

Draft Letter from MLK to Ms. Giunier

New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to an offer of assistance from a supporter. He directs her to the New York office to jumpstart her work and commends her for her interest in the Freedom Movement.

Letter from MLK to Minnie N. Thompson

Monday, April 9, 1962
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Minnie N. Thompson for her encouragement. He states he will make an effort to meet her son when he visits the Morehouse College Campus.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

Monday, December 4, 1967
VIETNAM, New York, NY

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962
Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

Albany, GA

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963
Wisconsin (WI)

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Letter From MLK to Mr. Berkowitz

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding demonstrations in Montgomery.