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"Little Rock, AR"

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In this draft telegram, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to President Kennedy for the Executive Order outlawing discrimination in all federally assisted housing.

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Man

Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

The Chicago Freedom Movement: MLK Address

Friday, December 2, 1966

In this statement, Dr. King speaks on behalf of the Chicago Freedom Movement. Dr. King provides details concerning the overall mission, leadership and the predicated involvement of community organizations and participants.

Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding

This document provides a detail description of Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding, a candidate for the Democratic primary in the 53rd assembly district.

Telegram from Charles William Butler to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965

Charles William Butler, Pastor of New Cavalry Baptist Church, informs Dr. King that he will not be present at a board meeting. The lateness of the invitation and his involvement in Detroit, Michigan prevent his attendance.

Letter Regarding the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition

A letter drafted by Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph, co-Chairmen of the Urban Coalition. includes article clippings from various newspapers discussing the dire need for public service employment, private employment, educational disparities, reconstruction and urban development, and equal housing opportunities.

Letter from T. W. Cole Sr. to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963

The General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity sends Dr. King a contribution to aid the SCLC in the quest for "human dignity." Dr. King was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha at Boston University in 1952.

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise

Friday, October 4, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wise to inform them of a transfer of funds to the intended recipient.

Pamphlet on Benjamin E. Mays

Benjamin E. Mays, the President of Morehouse College, is highlighted in this pamphlet.

Invitation from Frederick S. Wallin to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963

Frederick E. Wallin invites Dr. King to speak at the Alderson-Broaddus College's Civic Interest Week, a weeklong study and discussion on political and economic concerns. He explains that he is inviting the most controversy speakers would seriously appreciated Dr. King's attendance.

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Letter from Ivery Simmons to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Ivery Simmons, President of Simmons Construction Company, informs Dr. King that his organization will assist with renovating the slum areas through out the nation, if financially supported by the government.

Letter from MLK to Glenn Greenwood

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Glenn Greenwood's letter thanking him for his suggestion regarding the Pentagon directive "in relation to Armed Forces personnel participation in civil rights demonstrations."

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

Letter to MLK from Rev. L.C. Coleman

Thursday, June 15, 1967

Rev. Coleman, of Marks, Mississippi addresses Dr. King, as the recipient of this correspondence. This letter asks for Dr. King to visit the town of Marks and participate in a Citizenship Class. It, also, notes that Rev. Coleman is running for a town elected position, known as "Road Supervisor."

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Letter from Rev. John Bartos to MLK Regarding "Strength to Love"

Monday, March 1, 1965

Rev. John Bartos referenced Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in his sermon to the First Baptist Church congregation. Rev. Bartos focused on the chapter "Being a Good Neighbor," in which Dr. King discusses a story of a car accident and the discriminatory triage process that contributed to the occupants' deaths. The sermon produced questions and reactions the writer is hoping Dr. King can address.

Hosea

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Hosea and his views of God.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 24, 1964

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Marcellus Biot to Coretta Scott King offering Condolences

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mr. Biot of Los Angeles, CA offers sympathies to Mrs. King behalf of himself and Mother Green.

Actual Occasions

Dr. King quotes philosopher Alfred North Whitehead's "Religion in the Making." He interprets the phases in events and how such events are perceived.