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"Little Rock, AR"

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

Letter from Vivian S. Florence to MLK

Sunday, November 10, 1963

Ms. Florence informs Dr. King she has sent two other letters to the SCLC, both of which included contributions from the United Mine Workers of America. She expresses concern regarding mail tampering due to Dr. King's notoriety.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

Letter from Robert S. Browne to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

Robert S. Browne informs Dr. King that he disagrees with the editor the New York Times. Browne conveys his support to Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy.

Telegram from Lavinia Underwood to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

Lavinia Underwood writes Dr. King to discourage the possibility of a march that could strain relationships with white people.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

Friday, March 9, 1962

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Paix, Bonheur, Sante et Amour pour l'an 1960

Friday, January 1, 1960

Dr. King received this card from the editor of the French tabloid Paris-Jour (Paris Day). The headline reads, "Peace, Happiness, Health and Love for the Year 1960."

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

MLK Speaks to People of Watts

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Dr. King speaks on what it will take to make Los Angeles a better city.

Operation Breadbasket Advises Tastee Bread Company on Negro Economic Relations

The Cincinnati and Midwestern Division of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket provides Tastee Bread Company with several recommendations concerning employment practices and involvement in the Negro community.

Folder

The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.

Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Wednesday, April 27, 1966

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

Saturday, July 2, 1966

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

Plans for Progress: Atlanta Survey

The Southern Regional Council releases a special report regarding Atlanta's "Plans for Progress," a program that gives the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity power to require contractors to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. According to a study, only three of the twenty-four firms appeared to be interested in abiding by the "Plans for Progress." These were Lockheed, Western Electric Company, and Goodyear.

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Letter from Fred S. Bertsch Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965

Fred Bertsch Jr., Principal of the Holland School in Michigan, informs Dr. King that the school has made other arrangements for its commencement ceremony.

Letter from the N.H.W.P.A to Dr. King

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing his dislike of African Americans.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Auguste Sabatier's "Outlines of a Philosophy of Religion Based on Psychology and History."

Letter from Annie Grace to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Thirteen-year-old Annie G. Miller expresses her admiration for Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from Marie King

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

Marie King writes to express her support for Dr. King.

Letter from Rabbi William Herskowitz to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Rabbi William Herskowitz, editor of The Jewish Horizon, asks Dr. King to read and write a review on the book, "Negro and Jew."

Letter from Matilda Ressy to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Matilda Ressy sends her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Rauschenbusch on Sin

Dr. King references and outlines Rauschenbusch's view on sin. Rauschenbusch was a Baptist minister and a key figure in the Social Gospel movement.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett to MLK

Monday, September 9, 1963

The American Friends Service Committee is a peace and service organization that seeks to promote social justice in the United States and around the world. Mr. Pickett, a current representative, invites Dr. King to be a part of a lecture series that will be presented in all major U.S. cities. In addition, he offers Dr. King monetary compensation for travel and hospitality accommodations.