Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"London, England"

Telegram from Josephine Jones to MLK

Ms. Jones, President of the Metropolitan Community Leaders, writes to Dr. King about Albert Shanker's stance on African American education.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Conference on Social Statistics Resolutions

This document lists a number of solutions for improving the acknowledgement of minorities in America. These solutions were drafted during the Conference on Social Statistics held in Washington D.C.

Letter from MLK to Maj Palmberg

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Dr. King's informs Miss Palmberg that he is unable to accept her invitation to visit Finland.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Cornelius E. Gallagher writes Dr. King concerning the signing of the discharge petition concerning home rule for the District of Columbia.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Marcus Tullius Cicero’s “De Natura Deorum,” providing references from William Wallace’s “The Logic of Hegel.”

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Peter A. Mullin

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Dr. King writes Mr. Mullin to express his deep appreciation for being selected to receive the Gold Key Award at Boston College.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Program From MLK's Nobel Peace Prize Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

This is the program from a Recognition Dinner honoring Dr. King sponsored by the Citizens of Atlanta following his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. It took place at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel and included an address by Dr. King.

Letter from Bella McGregor to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1961

Bella T. McGregor asks Dr. King for a copy of his sermon titled "St. Paul's Letter to American Christians."

Man

Dr. King notes the subject of man, quoting Algernon Charles Swinburne's "The Hymn of Man."

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

Evil

Dr. King writes about evil, according to Jeremiah 44: 23.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

Letter from Frank Thompson, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Congressman Thompson of New Jersey writes Dr. King to acknowledge his recent letter urging his support of the vote against the Mississippi Delegation. Thompson informs Dr. King that he was one of Representatives who opposed the seating, and although dissenters did not prevail he is convinced "that this action has helped in the fight to enfranchise those who have been discriminated against for so long."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Lucile Giles

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Lucile Giles that Dr. King will be notified of her books upon his return to the office.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Wachman

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King informs Dr. Wachman, that due to his extremely busy schedule and his particular attention to the South, he will not be able to accept an invitation to speak at Lincoln University.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Rosen to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Mrs. Samuel Rosen writes Dr. King recollecting when she marched with him in Montgomery. Rosen states that she and her husband are proud of Dr. King and his works regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Edward McGaughy to MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963

Edward McGaughy writes to Dr. King suggesting a "Christmas for Human Rights." The writer highlights a strategy to help make it possible for families in need to receive aid.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

SCLC Newsletter: Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany

In this newsletter, SCLC announces integration in Albany, GA and believes that the city will soon face the legal death of segregation. They also inform readers of the arrest of SCLC Petersburg President, David Gunter.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Affidavit of Theo R. Wright

Friday, May 10, 1963

In an attempt to redirect the focus of Negro students in Birmingham, Superintendent Theo R. Wright presents a sworn affidavit detailing his responsibilities and plans to revitalize the educational direction of Birmingham Public Schools.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

Rev. Roland de Corneille informs Dr. King that he has been invited by the International Teach-In Committee at the University of Toronto to participate in a program featuring representatives from Vietnam.

God

Dr. King elaborates on Thomas Aquinas' views on the existence of God.

Postcard from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

The Mayor of Jerusalem sends Dr. King a panoramic postcard of the city.