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Letter from Dora McDonald to Dwight Campbell

Monday, September 28, 1964

Miss McDonald regretfully informs Mr. Campbell that Dr. King is unable to attend the October 7th Methodist Youth Fellowship engagement.

Suffering (Illustration)

Dr. King uses a Lily Dougall story from “God and the Struggle for Existence” as an example of suffering.

Letter from Herman Will, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Herman Will, Associate General Secretary for the Division of Peace and World Order, General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church expresses his appreciation to Dr. King.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

Letter from Alan Campbell to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963

Alan B. Campbell writes Dr. King to express his appreciation for the address "Paul's letter to American Christians," which he hopes to republish in national journals such as Readers' Digest.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter from Kerstin Lindblom to the SCLC

Thursday, September 8, 1966

A Student from Sweden offers to come to America to work for the SCLC. Her letter describes all the ways she wishes to help.

Letter from Captain Leonard Larsen to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966

Captain Leonard Larsen writes Dr. King and attaches a copy of President John F. Kennedy's "Final Plea" regarding his sentiments about the Vietnam War. Larsen hopes to enhance and promote progress towards Dr. King's anti-war campaign.

Letter from Frederick Koury and Albert Shanker to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

Various representatives of the United Federation of Teachers in New York City inquire if Dr. King would be able and willing to speak at their upcoming Spring Conference Luncheon. Bayard Rustin will be the guest of honor and will receive the John Dewy Award.

SCLC Fund Appeal from MLK

Dr. King discusses SCLC's continued priority work in the South. the Los Angeles riots and the need for ongoing voter registration. He makes the point that, "contributions are more than money - they are affirmations of confidence and dedication to democratic change."

Letter from Steve Addams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Steve Addams writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for Dr. King's work. Addams also offers his condolences for the death of Martin Luther King, Sr.

God

Dr. King records his thoughts on the book of Deuteronomy to illustrate the oneness of God.

Letter from The Very Rev. Raymond J. Swords to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Fr. Raymond J. Swords, S.J., President of the College of the Holy Cross, writes to Dr. King, expressing how joyous he was to hear that King was selected as the 1964 Nobel Prize Winner.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion" on temporal things so filling people's minds that they don't have room for the eternal. He contrasts this with pantheism. The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Friday, July 1, 1966

This program outlines the prevalent social and economic disadvantages of the Negro population of Chicago. The authors give detailed accounts on the presence of impoverished areas and ghettos that systematically oppress African American opportunities for education, housing, and employment. In the past, Negroes have begged, pleaded, and reasoned with white city officials to change community conditions.

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

Mind

Dr. King writes on Herbert Spencer's interpretation of the mind.

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sunday, May 24, 1964

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.

Congratulatory Letter from L.K. Jackson to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

In this letter, Dr. Johnson writes to Dr. King congratulating him on his tenth anniversary. Jackson states, "...you are the man of the Twentieth Century."

Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood

Monday, April 8, 1968

This is the itinerary for the Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood to Dr. King's funeral site. A group of bereaved citizens from Northeast Atlanta organized this walk to express human solidarity.

Handwritten Letter from MLK to Dr. Westin

Dr. King writes to decline the invitation of Dr. Alan F. Westin to serve on the Honorary Advisory Board of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties at Columbia University. He cites the urgent demands on his time by the civil rights movement as his reason.

Ethics

Dr. King writes on the topic "ethics," according to Proverbs 6: 17-19.

Memorandum from SCLC Personnel Committee to the Steering Committee

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

SCLC's Personnel Committee conducts a meeting to review the release of William Whitsett from Department of Information. The meeting resulted in the committee's unanimous decision to send a list of recommendations for the Steering Committee to review.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Letter from Claudine Shannon to MLK

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Claudine Shannon, a member of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, asks Dr. King to officiate her wedding ceremony. She mentions that he married her brother several years ago and explains that the bridegroom will cover all of Dr. King's expenses.

Press Conference on the Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King and SCLC members have accepted the invitation to join the fight for a quality integrated education for the children of Chicago.

Letter from Robert Balkind to Rev. Abernathy about NAACP

Monday, April 15, 1968

This letter, written by the CEO of Hampton Manufacturing Co., references an attached letter for the NAACP.