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Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
California (CA)

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966
New York (NY)

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Telegram from Icabod Flewellen to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Icabod Flewellen welcomes Dr. King to Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter from Edmond Melis to MLK

Saturday, January 23, 1965

Edmond Melis asks Dr. King to write a forward for an international police association magazine. He also expresses an interest in helping end discrimination in the United States.

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Letter from Jill Chisholm to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Johannesburg, South Africa

Ms. Chisholm, from South Africa, informs Dr. King of her temporary stay in the United States to research the non-violent movement and work of SCLC. She request to meet with Dr. King to discuss his work in Atlanta, GA and Chicago, IL.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962
South Africa, CANADA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), London, England, GHANA, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Atlantic City, NJ, Michigan (MI), Kentucky (KY)

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

Antiwar Slogans

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee issues a list of official slogans for Vietnam War protest placards. Groups and individuals who intend to protest are asked to use these slogans on their self-made placards with the phrase "STOP THE WAR NOW" printed at the bottom.

Black Power

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK, Clarence Jones and Stanley Levison

Saturday, March 14, 1964
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Joan Daves expresses the importance of gaining proper copyright reassignment for Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Letter from Nancy F. Oakes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Nancy Oakes writes a letter of support to Reverend Ralph Abernathy and wishes him success with the March for the Poor People's Crusade.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Negro Population

Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA)

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

Letter from George Field to Ms. McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Fields requests advance text of remarks Dr. King is to give at the Twenty-second Freedom House Anniversary Dinner. The Freedom House Dinner receives major attention from the media and boasts a guest list of influential opinion makers.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Moisa Bulboaca

Monday, May 16, 1966
Shreveport, LA, ROMANIA

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Louisiana native Moisa Bulboaca invites Dr. King to visit Romania. Ms. McDonald states Dr. King is involved in the freedom struggle and at the present time will be unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from MLK to Thomas Harten

Monday, July 15, 1963
New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes to Rev. Harten of the Holy Trinity Baptist Church to thank him and his organization for the donation of one thousand dollars. He explains how the money will be used throughout the SCLC and the importance of having support from organizations who help contribute to the Civil Rights Movement.

Invitation from Susan Rowland to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Susan Rowland invites Dr. King to the University of Western Ontario to give an address during the spring of 1968. During his visit he is expected to speak on the topics of civil rights and the Vietnam conflict. Although these are the areas of focus, Ms. Rowland explains that the exact nature of the talk is up to Dr. King's discretion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Creger

Tuesday, October 22, 1963
Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King's secretary responds to Mr. Creger's request to use "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" in his book. Ms. McDonald informs the author that the Letter is being expanded in an upcoming publication, therefore all requests for reprints are being denied. The Letter would eventually be published in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in 1964.

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Letter from Vince Hartke to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Democratic Indiana Senator Vance Hartke informs Dr. King that the Senate might not vote on the issue of the Voting Rights Bill due to a recent decision concerning the constitutionality of a poll tax.

Letter from Dora McDonald to James Pike

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
San Francisco, CA

Dora McDonald informs Dr. James A. Pike that Dr. King will be able to preach for Grace Cathedral's Consecration celebration. She suggests that Dr. Pike lists five possible dates for Dr. King to fulfill this commitment in San Francisco.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Atlanta, GA

E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Wednesday, June 15, 1966
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.