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Hints on Religious Music for Radio

New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA, New York (NY)

This pamphlet, written by Charles Schmitz, acknowledges the impact of music on religious radio. Schmitz maintains that music helps establish the purpose of religious radio programs and that certain musical selections have the power to create Christian mood and comfort. This pamphlet gives instructions on how best to implement music.

Letter from Colin W. Bell to MLK

Tuesday, May 17, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Colin W. Bell invites Dr. King to deliver a lecture during the anniversary activities of the American Friends Service Committee. This letter also includes Dora McDonald's shorthand in red ink.

MLK's Statement on Birmingham Jails

Monday, May 6, 1963
Birmingham, AL

During a broadcast, Dr. King states that the witness and determination of those incarcerated in Birmingham, will break down the barriers of segregation.

Letter From Joan Daves to Hermine Popper

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Hermine Popper of an issue regarding writing credit for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here."

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Thursday, July 20, 1967
Texas (TX), VIETNAM

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Moment (Its Meaning)

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature."

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter from Rabbi Dudley Weinberg to MLK

Monday, September 14, 1964
Wisconsin (WI), Milwaukee, WI, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, St. Augustine, FL

Rabbi Dudley Weinberg writes Dr. King requesting him to give a sermon in Wisconsin because he believes that his presence there would provide "enormous impetus for the work which many of [us] are attempting to get done on behalf of our Negro fellow citizens."

Letter from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 6, 1967
Chicago, IL

David Wallace writes Dora McDonald and attaches contributions from Negro businessmen involved with Chicago's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Beatrice Rossell to MLK

Saturday, July 4, 1964
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA

Beatrice Rossell wrote this letter to Dr. King on Independence Day in 1964, commending him on the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and enclosing a donation. She ends her note, saying "God bless you, your fine family, and the future of your great work."

Definitions

Dr. King defines a set of words such as, "Gospel" and "Justification."

Letter from Hubert Reaves to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968
Michigan (MI)

Rev. Ralph Abernathy was the recipient of this letter from a prison inmate. The author also makes a request for an SCLC membership form and a picture of Dr. King, as a keepsake.

Montanism

Dr. King records information about the second century Christian movement known as Montanism.

CORE List of 33 Lunch Counters With Unchanged Policies

Monday, February 20, 1961
Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), Arkansas (AR), South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Virginia (VA)

This document is a CORE list of cities where lunch counter demonstrations have been ineffective.

Faith

Dr. King quotes English author and priest William Ralph Inge's "Lay Thoughts of a Dean," as well as English soldier and essayist Donald Hankey.

Irresistible Grace

Dr. King notes the meaning of irresistible grace.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965
Lowndes County, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Missouri Prisoner Melvin Shepard to MLK

Missouri (MO)

Melvin Shepard, a prisoner in the Missouri State Penitentiary, requests that Dr. King respond to his earlier letters. Shepard explains that Dr. King can help by sending "some young lawyers."

American Committee On Africa Invitation to Protest Apartheid

Tuesday, March 7, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, South Africa, Johannesburg, South Africa

This form letter informs and invites the recipients to attend functions sponsored by the American Committee on Africa in protest against Chase Manhattan Bank's financial relationship with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967
VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

Religious Index - MLK Notes

Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

This document illustrates how to put together a sermon for religious services and contains notes from Dr. King.

Letter from Gus C. Zucco to MLK

Friday, October 12, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Gus Zucco writes Dr. King regarding the changes of his schedule in hopes that he will be able to speak in Pennsylvania.

MLK Appearance List

Pennsylvania (PA), North Carolina (NC), Maine (ME), Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), London, England, Berlin, Germany, New York, NY

This itinerary highlights Dr. King's appearances over a six month period.

Men of Past and Present Pamphlet

INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This pamphlet features quotes 'Men of Past and Present,' including religious and political leaders, on democracy and cooperatives.

Letter from Jacob Broertjes to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 7, 1964
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, GERMANY, DENMARK, SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA

Jacob Broertjes informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King will speak at two sessions for the European Baptist Federations. The services will be brought to various European countries via television. Mr. Broertjes details the intricacies of Dr. King's visit.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Report

New York (NY), Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA

This report details a statistical count of Jewish communities being discriminated against according to a market research that was conducted by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Telegram from Rev T R Albert to MLK

Louisiana (LA), New York, NY

Rev. T.R. Albert, Pastor of Weslay Methodist Church, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, sent Dr. King words of encouragment while he recovered in the Harlem hospital.

Messianic Age (Haggai)

Dr. King makes reference to the Biblical governor Zerubbabel. The specific passage to which Dr. King refers reads, "On that day, says the Lord of Hosts, I will take you Zerubbabel, son of Shealtiel, my servant, and wear you like a signet ring; for it is you whom I have chosen. This is the word of the Lord of Hosts" (Hag. 2:23).

Painting

Dr. King paraphrases Homer's "The Odyssey" and quotes some prose entitled "The Bible."

Letter from Marian Hargrave to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Ms. Hargrave offers her support for Dr. King and his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. She also discusses the religious aspects of the struggle, which she feels give it a deeper meaning.