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"Los Angeles, California"

Hegel

Dr. King references German philosopher, George Hegal, in this handwritten notecard.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

War on Poverty

Dr. King calls for the end of poverty in the African American community through the mobilization of interracial coalitions. He states that the negative effects of discriminatory laws will not cease to end by the enforcement of the Civil Rights Bill, nor will it cease if the laws were immediately repealed, but only by the building of alliances among the black and white communities will these issues be eliminated.

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Choose Life"

This handwritten document is an outline of a sermon entitled "Choose Life."

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

I Sat Where They Sat Sermon Outline

This sermon draft of Dr. King's was never delivered, but focuses on the Christian themes of empathy and understanding. Dr. King claims that "if the white man was closer to the Negro he would... ...understand them" better.

Telegram from Mr. Robert Lieberman to MLK about Denver Teachers Union

In this telegram, Mr. Lieberman writes to Dr. King requesting his support for an upcoming unionization vote by Denver public school teachers.

Letter to MLK from Philip L. Estrada about Operation Breadbasket Milwaukee

Phillip Estrada, the editor of the Milwaukee Star News, request Dr. King's presence in support of the Breadbasket Operation. Estrada describes this growing organization as one that has made an impression on Milwaukee. He hopes that Dr. King will deliver words of encouragement to keep the morale up and to show his support.

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

Telegram from Simon Anekwe to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1967

Simon Anekwe urges Dr. King to visit Nigeria and states that Dr. King's intervention would save thousands.

Letter from Mrs. Willie Mae White to SCLC

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mrs. Willie Mae White requests help from SCLC. She explains that she has fifteen children and would like to provide Christmas dinner and gifts, but does not have the financial means to do so. As a poor family in Scottsdale, Georgia, her family struggles, living without many basic necessities. Mrs. White also appeals to the members of SCLC, imploring them to send any available household ware, such as curtains, sheets, clothes, and kitchen utensils.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Power of Attorney

Wednesday, November 29, 1961

This document appoints Chauncey Eskridge as agent and attorney for Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr. in Philadelphia.

Letter of Support from New Jersey Resident

Monday, April 10, 1967

Writing a third party, the author of this letter voices his support for Dr. King and his views on the Vietnam war.

MLK Drafted as a Presidential Candidate Announcement

The Peoples Committee of America drafts Dr. King as their candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election.

Transcripts of Speeches And Statements Along The Meridith March

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King discusses the recent violent challenge faced by the Negro and the SCLC in which they have experienced a "threat of murder." This issue has motivated Dr. King to continuously press for social change and maintain the responsibilities in Mississippi.

Letter from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Thursday, November 29, 1962

Melvin Arnold addressed this letter to Dr. King, inquiring about the publishing of his second book, "Stregnth to Love."This letter contains a request for Dr. King to negotiate a contract and deal with issues of royalties. Also included is Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

Letter from Martin Kessler to MLK

Thursday, November 10, 1966

Martin Kessler sends Dr. King an article by Daniel P. Moynihan entitled "Is There Really an Urban Crisis?" Moynihan addresses issues of the economic and social conditions in America in the interview with Challenge Magazine.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967

Tobe Johnson asks Dr. King and other members of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees to fill out a questionnaire in preparation for re-accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to John H. Calhoun

Dr. and Mrs. King deliver their condolences for the recent passing of Mason, brother of John H. Calhoun. The Kings informs Mr. Calhoun that he is not alone in his hour of mourning and that the community is also suffering this great loss.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. N. W. Christian

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Mr. Christian on Dr. King's behalf. She acknowledges his disagreement with Dr. King's philosophy and refers him to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for answers to his questions.

Letter from Congressman John Conyers to MLK

Friday, October 8, 1965

Congressman Conyers thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the Mississippi Challenge and gives him details regarding the vote in Congress.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to lunch after the Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting.

1963 World Day of Prayer

Friday, March 5, 1965

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from R. A. Peterson

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This letter of condolence, originating from a Bank of America executive in San Francisco, CA and addressed to Mrs. King. The writer expresses hope that Dr. King's work and legacy will carry forward in his tradition of nonviolence.