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"Los Angeles, California"

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

Sunday, April 23, 1967

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Letter from Committee on Racial Justice

Sunday, February 11, 1968

In this letter, the Committee on Racial Justice provides update on their activities and encouragement.

Letter from Rosetta Ritz to MLK

Sunday, March 13, 1966

Rosetta Ritz expresses admiration and gratitude to Dr. King for his selfless efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Ms. Ritz hopes Dr. King will find time to visit with "economically deprived" children in the Chicago area.

Copyright Agreement for MLK’s Nobel Lecture

This is the Copyright Assignment Agreement established between Dr. King and the Nobel Foundation.

Letter to MLK from Ida Kinney

Ida Kinney sends Dr. King a letter expressing her support for his work. She informs him that she would like to begin making monthly financial donations toward the movement.

Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

Letter from Shelley Winters Franciosa to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1959

Actress Shelley Winters sends Dr. King her personal copy of "The Diary of Anne Frank" after he and Mrs. King attend a screening for the film adaptation in New York. Winters would go on to receive an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for the film.

Letter from Ralph H. Eaton to MLK

Friday, June 18, 1965

Ralph Eaton explains to Dr. King why he will no longer send contributions to the SCLC.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

Letter from Donald Keys to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Donald F. Keys writes to Dr. King about Dr. King's invitation to speak at a planned Washington Mobilization on Vietnam. Keys also tells Dr. King that he may have to go to Africa at the time of the meeting, and requests that Mrs. King deliver his address in his absence.

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

Letter from Ms. Dora Byron of Emory University to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

In this letter, Ms. Byron of Emory University's Community Educational Service requests for Dr. King to appear on a new campus public service television program entitled "Profile."

Letter of Invite from M. J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

In this letter, M. J. Jones invites Dr. King and Mrs. King to be his guest at a dinner with Dr. L. Harold DeWolf. DeWolf is delivering three lectures over the course of two days, to which Dr. and Mrs. King are also invited.

Letter from Sidney Eisenberger to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1961

Sidney Eisenberger sends a donation and words of encouragement to Dr. King. He praises Dr. King's work, particularly the focus on political involvement. He humorously writes that he hopes that he will one day be so unconscious of color that he will "feel free to regard a negro auto driver with the same venomous hatred I give to white drivers."

Civil Rights Movement Suggestions from MLK Supporter

This note to Dr. King outlines six suggestions to address inequality and aid with employment, education and civil rights reform.

Telegram for Dora McDonald to Sheraton Atlantic Hotel

Saturday, March 17, 1962

This hotel reservation is for Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker.

Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

Monday, February 5, 1968

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

William E. Channing

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

Getting Caught in the Negative

Dr. King references the Book of Acts regarding his sermon "Getting Caught in the Negative." King asserts, "Don't get bogged down in the negative. Christianity must forever offer to the world a dynamic positive."

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

Letter from James O'Malley to MLK

Father James O'Malley of St. Nicholas of Tolentine Church in Chicago asks Dr. King to withdraw from the Chicago Lawn area. He is concerned about the potential response to integration of the Lithuanians and Poles who live in the neighborhood.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Schedule for Oslo Trip

This itinerary outlines Dr. King's schedule leading up to the Nobel Peace Prize Award Ceremony. The itinerary includes flight arrangements, speaking engagements, interviews, sight seeing, press conferences and tourist activities.

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

Letter from MLK to J. E. L. Graham

Thursday, September 15, 1966

Dr. King informs Mr. Graham that he is unable to accept an invitation to speak in Ontario extended by the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations. He further explains that this decision is necessary in order to spend more time resolving racial injustice issues in our country.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Maude Ballou

Wednesday, January 23, 1957

Coretta Scott King offers her gratitude to Maude Ballou for her sending a form for a birth certificate.

Laughable Comics Postcard from Johnny B.

The author Johnny B. provides his best wishes to the recipient of this post card, stating "God created everybody equal."

Letter from Henry Moon to Rev. Abernathy concerning "In Memoriam" Reproductions

Thursday, April 18, 1968

This letter from Henry Lee Moon to Rev. Abernathy, accompanies enclosures of reproductions of documents associated with the "In Memoriam" sections of various newspapers in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.