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"Los Angeles, California"

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
NETHERLANDS, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM, Atlanta, GA

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

King Assails Westmoreland, Praises Clay

Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, VIETNAM

This article discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King asserts that the US is on the wrong side of the war and denounces it during a speech at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Harold E. Fey to MLK 12/31/59

Thursday, December 31, 1959
Chicago, IL

Dr. King was the recipient of this correspondence from Harold Fey, Editor of 'The Christian Century.' Mr. Fey acknowledged Dr. King's article "How My Mind Has Changed" and raised one concern of why Dr. King didn't mention his stabbing incident, in the article. He referenced Paul in the Bible by quoting Galatians 6:17, "I bear on my body the marks of Jesus." 'The Christian Century' published the article "How My Mind Has Changed."

Letter from Dora McDonald to James Pike

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
San Francisco, CA

Dora McDonald informs Dr. James A. Pike that Dr. King will be able to preach for Grace Cathedral's Consecration celebration. She suggests that Dr. Pike lists five possible dates for Dr. King to fulfill this commitment in San Francisco.

Telegram from Malcolm X to MLK

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY)

Malcolm X offers Dr. King assistance with the situation in St. Augustine, including the organization of self-defense units.

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Wisconsin (WI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This contract outlines the details of a speaking engagement for Dr. King on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County Center.

Letter from SNCC's Dorothy Miller to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Greenwood, MS

Dorothy Miller of SNCC writes Dr. King informing him of the arson attempt at the SNCC office and thanks him for a previous correspondence regarding the case of Bob Zellner.

Letter of Thanks from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Monday, February 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for financial support to the college.

God (Knowledge of)

Dr. King references St. Thomas Aquinas' "Summa Contra Gentiles" in a quotation focusing on man's "threefold knowledge of divine things."

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. L. Wynter

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
JAMAICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald sends H. L. Wynter, Registrar for the University of the West Indies, an estimate on travel expenses Dr. King and Reverend Lee will require for their trip to Jamaica.

Faith and Reason

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

War by Executive Decree

NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, VIETNAM, Minnesota (MN)

Citizens for Governmental Restraint favors the impeachment of President Lyndon Johnson for declaring the war in Vietnam by Executive Order.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966
Oklahoma (OK), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.

Class Notes: Joshua

This eleven card series features Biblical verses from the Book of Joshua which Dr. King references under specific subject titles. The section titles range from "Knowledge" to "Passages for Homiletical Use."

Telegram from Senator Percy to MLK

Saturday, June 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Senator Charles H. Percy invites Dr. King to a private dinner to discuss innovative approaches for private sector involvement in the "urban problem."

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Judith Van Swaringen

Tuesday, December 15, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dorothy Gaines, assistant to Dr. King, responds to a letter from Judith Van Swaringen suggesting that she read the enclosed biographical sketch.

New Books: January to July 1964

Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), London, England

The publication company Hodder & Stoughton reviews Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Telegram from Yamanaka TV to Pete Seeger

Monday, December 4, 1967
JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, New York (NY)

A Japanese television host writes American folk singer and activist Pete Seeger requesting that he encourage Dr. King to accept an invitation to appear on the show.

Hell (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nikolai Berdyaev on the concept of hell.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

Thursday, December 15, 1966
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY, CANADA, INDIA, SWEDEN, NORWAY, ISRAEL

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, asks Dr. King if he would consider becoming a sponsor for the organization.

Letter from National Press Club to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

A representative from the National Press Club (Washington, D.C.) writes to Dr. King, asking him to review and correct any inaccuracies in a transcription from a Q & A that took place at the Press Club.

Letter from the International Convention of Christian Churches to MLK

Friday, October 7, 1966
Indiana (IN), Dallas, TX

The International Convention of Christian Churches communicates their appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the evening panel on "The Churches and the Struggle for Human Freedom, Dignity and Brotherhood." The executive secretary informs Dr. King of the enclosed honorarium for his contribution to this panel discussion.

Letter from Rosamond C. Kay, Jr. to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Rosamond Kay, Jr. invites Dr. King to speak at Morning Star Baptist Church in Pennsylvania. He also informs Dr. King he is a 1939 graduate of Morehouse College, and their fathers are life-long friends.

Letter from Richard Tucker and Stanford Ovshinsky to Lyndon Johnson

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

The Oakland County (Michigan) Peace Committee, believing U.S. involvement in Vietnam is a mistake, asks President Johnson and government representatives to stop bombing North Vietnam, promote a bilateral ceasefire, and enter multilateral negotiations.

Letter from Mary E. Peabody to MLK

Thursday, June 29, 1967
St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Boston, MA, Cambridge, MA

Mary E. Peabody writes a letter requesting that Dr. King send her a copy of one of his books along with a signature. She also informs him of her opinion on education and the racial issues the city of Boston faces.

Service of Dedication

Sunday, May 29, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, New York, NY, New York (NY)

This program outlines the schedule for a service held at Cornerstone Baptist Church Center in Brooklyn, New York. Dr. King and Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller are featured as guest speakers.

Letter from Froydis Kvaerk to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966
Oslo, Norway, Washington, D.C.

Norwegian student Froydis Kvaerk requests a copy of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in fulfillment of a class assignment on Dr. King and the civil rights struggle.