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Give Decency A Chance in the South...

Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Kentucky (KY), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Arkansas (AR), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK), Tennessee (TN), Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), West Virginia (WV), Delaware (DE)

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

New York Welfare Organizers to Join Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Susan Oreskes, a welfare organizer in New York City, informs Dr. King that 2000 people demonstrated as part of Dr. Spock’s peace campaign. She and Beulah Sanders, Citywide Coordinator of Welfare Groups, took 4 busses from the Upper West Side to George Wiley’s Poverty Rights Convention in Washington in August where they met with Senator Jacob Javits about a guaranteed minimum income. Mrs. Oreskes also states she wants to work with Dr. King and includes addresses for Beulah Sanders and Arnaldo Barrow of the Puerto Rican Community Project.

Letter From John Payak to Mrs. King & Family

Tuesday, April 16, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

John Payak offers condolences from a religious perspective to Mrs. King and family.

Telegram from John Conyers Jr. to MLK about a Meeting

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

In this telegram John Conyers, Jr. extends an invitation to Dr. King to attend a meeting for the discussion of black politics and related considerations. The meeting was to include Lerone Bennett, Julian Bond, Harry Belfonte, Richard Hatcher, Floyd McKissick, and Carl Stokes. Conyers also informs Dr. King of his itinerary and provides a number for him to be contacted.

Letter from Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
ARMENIA, New Jersey (NJ)

Ms. Tourian commends Dr. King for his efforts against violence and describes the antagonism and discrimination against immigrants when she came as an Armenian to the U.S. in 1903.

Letter form Pedro A. Otero Fernandez & Dora E. Cartagen to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965
PUERTO RICO, Montgomery, AL

The Rio Piedras' Lawyers Association of Puerto Rico congratulates Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. They express how they share Dr. King's same beliefs regarding the three great evils of mankind and hope to spread the movement under his leadership throughout the world.

Statement by MLK & Dr. W. G. Anderson

Wednesday, July 25, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King and Dr. Anderson release a statement declaring a "Day of Penance" for those in the Negro community who have not yet adopted the nonviolent strategy.

I Marched on Washington

Washington (WA), Louisiana (LA), Philadelphia, PA

Kelly E. Miller composed this poem for Dr. King as a tribute to the March on Washington.

Initiative for Peace In Vietnam

Friday, March 10, 1967
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, VIETNAM, Geneva, Switzerland, SWITZERLAND

Philip Noel-Baker and Father George Dominique Pire detail the origins of the Initiative for Peace in Vietnam and its action plan. As they explain, a group of Norwegian citizens approached living Nobel Peace Prize winners to develop a project focusing on achieving peace in Vietnam. To reach that goal, the initiative plans to send representatives to each group involved with the conflict in Vietnam.

Greeks

GREECE

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Clarence Lundquist

Thursday, March 15, 1962

Dr. King writes to the administrator of wage hour and public contracts division for the U.S. Department of Labor, Clarence Lundquist. In this telegram, Dr. King requests that Lundquist investigate a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act at Seapak Shrimp Factories. It is here that African Americans were told to sign statements that said they were handicapped. If the forms were signed the African American workers received significantly lower wages than before.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

Letter of Invitation from Jay Goodlette-Bass to Mrs. Corretta Scott King to the Pageantry of the Peace Prize Award

Monday, October 19, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

The Fariyah Agency acknowledges Mrs. King commitment to the movement via her commitment to Dr. King. Additionally, the author requests Mrs. King presence to attend the pageantry of the Peace Prize award.

Letter from L. E. Stahl to SCLC

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Ruth Stahl encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC for their commitment to improving the issues of the world. Mrs. Stahl intended to join the NAACP but decided to contribute to progressive organizations instead.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963
California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

Free Southern Theater Requests MLK's Financial Assistance

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

John O'Neal, Executive Director of the Free Southern Theater in New Orleans, requests financial assistance from Dr. King and the SCLC. Mr. O'Neal oversees a professional touring ensemble that performs in six states in the Deep South and a pilot project for a community theater program.

Letter from Morton M. Brooks to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Morton Brooks writes Dr. King to check his availability for April, May, or June of 1965 to speak at Mt. Zion's Sunday morning church service. Brooks expresses that he is aware of Dr. King's busy schedule, but would appreciate his consideration.

Letter from Pauline Wren to MLK

VIETNAM

Pauline Wren criticizes Dr. King for his endorsement of Adam Clayton Powell and asks for the immediate return of some "work" that was entrusted to Dr. King as a "minister and gentleman."

Letter from Danny Cupit to MLK

Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Danny Cupit writes to Dr. King and expresses his joy in reading one of Dr. King's books. He also acknowledges the pleasure of meeting Dr. and Mrs. King after a speech, given by Senator Kennedy.

Letter from Jacob H. Gilbert to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Congressman Gilbert writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter and copy of his book "Why We Can't Wait." Prior to the vote to seat the Mississippi delegation, Dr. King contacted several government officials urging them to vote against the seating. Congressman Gilbert states that he objected to the seating albeit unsuccessfully.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
California (CA)

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives this letter from U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding his testimony outlining his position on civil rights before the House Judiciary Committee.

Letter from Ezra J. Evans to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY)

Mrs. Evans writes to Dr. King, suggesting to the expansion of educational conferences on the Vietnam War for the purpose of peace keeping and service.

Cause, Error and Law

Dr. King quotes from Alfred North Whitehead's The Concept of Nature.

Telegram from SCLC to NAACP Convention

Tuesday, July 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference welcomes Roy Wilkins to Atlanta. They also express their hope that the laborers of the NAACP convenetion will help bring about equality.

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA

Martha Kennedy thanks Dr. King for sending her a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Kennedy feels that Dr. King's leadership is well emphasized in the context of the book. Particularly, she finds the chapter on Black Power to be "valuable." Mrs. Kennedy hopes for much success to Dr. King and his great work.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Monroe Defense Committee

Thursday, December 14, 1961
Cleveland, OH

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays, the president of Morehouse College, inquires what Dr. King may know about the Monroe Defense Committee.