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Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

War on Poverty

Dr. King calls for the end of poverty in the African American community through the mobilization of interracial coalitions. He states that the negative effects of discriminatory laws will not cease to end by the enforcement of the Civil Rights Bill, nor will it cease if the laws were immediately repealed, but only by the building of alliances among the black and white communities will these issues be eliminated.

The Boycott Explained

Saturday, April 10, 1965

Dr. King writes this article in the form of questions and answers to explain the purpose and impact of an upcoming boycott in Alabama.

Letter from Rev. Pavel Titera to MLK

Saturday, December 11, 1965

Pavel Titera responds to a letter from Dr. King, in which he expressed his hope for a coming to visit. Titera sends well wishes for Dr. King and his family, and encloses a photograph of his family "as a token of the brotherly love."

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from William H. Gray to Eugene Rhoads

Friday, April 19, 1963

William H. Gray encloses an article regarding advice given to Dr. King by Billy Graham. Graham admits that he "is not a thoroughgoing integrationist. "

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

Thursday, June 27, 1963

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

Tests of Great Music

Dr. King lists five criteria to use to evaluate whether a piece of music is great. Great music should hold its appeal over time, connect different experiences, foster a deeper life experience, unify history and integrate the individual personality.

SCLC News Release: The State of Negro Education in the South

This SCLC news release discusses the terrible educational conditions endured by African American students in the South. It also highlights effective solutions to exposing "negro youngsters" to better teachers and a better quality of learning.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964

This letter from Ms. Daves to Dr. King features requests regarding his itinerary for his trip to England.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politiics

Sunday, November 28, 1965

The Conference on Strengthening the New Politics was formed from a desire to have real constituencies who have control over their elected officials and a concern for local grassroots political development. It is the hope of this conference that the styles of liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement could come together to form a new elective politic.

Call to Survival

Sunday, November 5, 1967

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

Letter from MLK to Peter S. Kliewer

Thursday, July 13, 1967

In response to a "letter to the editor" from the "Times-Advocate" sent in by a reader, Dr. King addresses America's role in Vietnam.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

Telegram to Alan Reitman from MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Dr. King informs Alan Reitman of the American Civil Liberties Union that he will sign a statement opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Securities Committee.

Telegram from MLK to William Miller

Friday, February 16, 1968

Dr. King writes Mr. William O. Miller, of the Concerned Teachers and Parents of Philadelphia, commending them for their efforts advocating for African-American education in their community.

MLK Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, March 26, 1946

Dr. King answers a number of questions for an exam in his Bible course. He covers diverse topics, including prophecy and the Book of Job.

Monophysitism

Dr. King distinguishes between monophysitism and the Chalcedonian Creed, which recognizes two natures in Christ.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Science (Its Limitations)

Dr. King notes that while man’s actions as an animal are biological (science), his actions as a person are spiritual and require a spiritual cause, suggesting there is a Creator God.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

Science

Dr. King writes about Lewis Mumford’s view in “The Condition of Man” that an increase in scientific knowledge requires an increase in moral discipline.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Dr. King praises President John F. Kennedy for his eloquent appeal for freedom and justice and says the President's message will become "a hallmark in the annals of American history" if his proposed legislation is passed.

Letter from Ned French to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

A high school student requests the political opinions of several famous individuals concerning the national issues and potential candidates of the 1968 presidential election.

Letter from MLK to Marcia Burke

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

Dr. King appreciates the invitation extended to him to speak for the Ohio Wesleyan University Student Committee on Race Relations, but must decline it.

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."