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Senator Edward Kennedy's Address to SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966

Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) addresses the 1966 SCLC Annual Convention, stating that the sit-ins, freedom rides and Montgomery bus boycott created a movement that brought about the most important change of the last 20 years. He says that while the caste system in politics is over, the life of the average Negro hasn’t changed much. Society is becoming divided rich and poor, black and white, and a massive commitment of national resources must be made to upgrade Negro life in America.

Fred M. Holt, Jr. Asks MLK to Suggest A Member of the Senior Citizens Commitee

Monday, May 27, 1963

Fred H. Holt, Jr., Chairman of the Annual Meeting Committee for the Houston Council on Human Relations, writes Dr. King asking him to recommend someone on the Senior Citizens Committee to serve as the speaker for a banquet.

Acronym: B.L.A.C.K. P.O.W.E.R.

This is a detailed acronym for the term "Black Power."

Draft of Showdown for Nonviolence

Monday, April 1, 1968

This is a draft, with Dr. King's revisions, of the article "Showdown for Nonviolence" for Look Magazine. The article was published posthumously on April 16, 1968.

Letter From Henry Springs Jr. to MLK

Friday, September 2, 1966

Mr. Henry Springs requests Dr.King's help in creating "Action Programs," that would be beneficial to the African-American community in Lake County, Illinois.

A Program for the Public Meeting at Metropolitan Baptist Church

Thursday, September 27, 1962

This program outlines a two-day Public Meeting sponsored by the SCLC at Metropolitan Baptist Church, where Dr. King was scheduled to deliver the key address.

Letter from Eleanor A. Lofton of the Pittsburgh Courier to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Eleanor Lofton, Acting Publisher for the Pittsburgh Courier, asks Dr. King to include a message for the "Brotherhood" edition of their publication. Lofton explains that they are seeking "all men of goodwill" to be a part of the edition and that they will be anticipating his timely response.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

AFON received a grant of $60,000 from the Stern Family Fund. Mr. Wachtel offers Mr. Hunter a report of progress and invites him to a conference concerning the grant.

Letter from Joseph L. Kapica to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Joseph Kapica, a freelance writer from Connecticut, requests special commentary from Dr. King regarding the issue of interracial adoption. Kapica writes about interracial adoption based on findings from the Child Welfare League of America.

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman on the principle of moral law.

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Hegel

Dr. King documents a quote from philosopher Thomas Hegel regarding God and knowledge before commenting with his own thoughts.

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

The United Nations Special Committee of 24

The United Nations Special Committee of 24 plans a series of meetings to discuss colonial territories in Africa, Aden, Oman, Mauritius, Seychelles and others.

Wisdom

Here Dr. King quotes Proverbs 8:22-23 and sketches his view that "Wisdom was created by God before the earth was created, and it aids him [sic] [in] the creative process."

The World of the Patriarchs

Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Letter from Grenville Clark to Dr. King Regarding the N.A.A.C.P Legal Defense Fund

Thursday, July 28, 1966

In this letter, Grenville Clark provides details about his involvement with the N.A.A.C.P Legal Defense Fund, which he believes the kind of work it is doing must be constantly supplemented by the mass non-violence direct action.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Letter to Andrew Young from Irving Kaler

Thursday, February 16, 1967

Kaler writes to express excitement in the SCLC working with The Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta (of which he is a part). He looks forward to discussing ways in which both organizations can compliment each other.

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

Memo from Harry Boyte to MLK

Mr. Boyte asks Dr. King to review the document "ACTION FOR DEMOCRACY." He also attaches two tables for his review.

Acknowledgement of Condolences

A standard form of an acknowledgment response, in reference to the receipt of condolences, is highlighted in this document.

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.