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"Louisiana (LA)"

Chicago Housing Discrimination Complaint

Friday, April 29, 1966

This official complaint to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education references a particular instance of housing discrimination that took place at the Houser Real Estate office.

Letter from US Soldiers Lester Hill, James Gardner and Homer Collier to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965

Three Negro soldiers communicate with Dr. King regarding the racial practices of white GIs against fellow Negro GIs. The soldiers feel pressure to not only fight against the enemy but to watch over their shoulders to shield themselves from intimidation against the white GIs. Lester Hill writes on behalf of soldiers requesting Dr. King's help.

Letter from Thomas Gilliam to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Thomas Gilliam writes this letter with hope that Dr. King will grant him an interview about the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

UAW 25th Anniversary Dinner Program

Thursday, April 27, 1961

The UAW's 25th Anniversary Dinner Program contains letters from notable activists commending the UAW, a statement from President Kennedy, a guest list, the evening's program, and a list of sponsors and donors. Guest speakers include: Dr. King, Senator Paul Douglas, Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg, and UAW President Walter Reuther.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Letter from MLK on behalf of Cosby Wallace

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King requests reconsideration of Mr. Cosby Wallace's status in the U. S. Army. The financial strain on Mr. Wallace’s family and a physical disability warrants his not being inducted.

Letter from Stacti L. Hourley to MLK

In this document, the Academic Vice President of Howard University requests an essay from Dr. King, on the occasion of his Gandhi Memorial Address. The writer further requests an autographed picture.

Letter from MLK to Victoria Gist

Dr. King apologizes for a belated reply and says he hopes the State Youth Congress meeting was successful. King was invited to be banquet speaker.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

War (Just War)

Dr. King cites Francisco Suarez's definition of a "just war" from his "Tractibus de. Legibus."

Telegram from Walter Friedrich to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Walter Friedrich, on behalf of the Peace Council of the German Democratic Republic, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Anonymous Telegram to President Johnson

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

This telegram, intended for the White House, was sent regarding the treatment of a former African American Secret Service agent, Abraham Bolden, at the federal medical center in Springfield, Missouri. The sender states that President Johnson ought to follow the United States Constitution and restore Mr. Bolden's freedom or face consequences.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from SNCC's Dorothy Miller to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963

Dorothy Miller of SNCC writes Dr. King informing him of the arson attempt at the SNCC office and thanks him for a previous correspondence regarding the case of Bob Zellner.

Statement from MLK Regarding Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

While serving a forty-five day sentence alongside Ralph D. Abernathy, Dr. King releases a statement expressing his appreciation for President Kennedy's support of the Albany Movement.

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, November 28, 1961

Dr. King thanks Miss Harvey of Oxford, England for her contribution to his cause. He suggests that she inquire about any regulations governing money coming from England to the US. He also expresses his hope to meet her in his travels.

The Many Faces of Black Power

The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Letter from Harold E. Fey to MLK 12/31/59

Thursday, December 31, 1959

Dr. King was the recipient of this correspondence from Harold Fey, Editor of 'The Christian Century.' Mr. Fey acknowledged Dr. King's article "How My Mind Has Changed" and raised one concern of why Dr. King didn't mention his stabbing incident, in the article. He referenced Paul in the Bible by quoting Galatians 6:17, "I bear on my body the marks of Jesus." 'The Christian Century' published the article "How My Mind Has Changed."

The Martin Luther King Column: Life's Three Dimensions

In this self titled column, Dr. King writes about his theory of the three dimensions of the life: length, breadth and height. He refers to the "length of life" as an individual's desire to achieve personal goals. Next, he speaks of the "breadth of life," which is characterized by reaching out and helping others. Last but not least, Dr. King describes the "height of life" or a person's spiritual pursuit and connection with God. Dr. King asserts that in order to live a complete life, all three dimensions must be cultivated.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Herbert Spencer's views on philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Comment On Proposed Resolution: Ending Racism in the Democratic Party

Friday, October 9, 1964

On October 9th, 1964, the Democratic National Convention adopted a resolution ending racial discrimination in Party membership.

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.

Chicago Nonviolent Action Proposal

SCLC's proposal for a nonviolent action campaign in Chicago identifies the city as the prototype for the northern urban race problem. The proposal includes a snapshot of the situation in Chicago, past approaches, SCLC?s philosophy of social change, a description of twelve different aspects of the problem of economic exploitation, and a plan and timetable for mobilizing forces. Objectives are stated for the federal, state, and local levels. SCLC proposes to work in collaboration with the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations.

Letter From Mae P. Godfrey

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mae P. Godfrey requests monetary assistance to support her family during the upcoming Christmas holiday.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Kennedy

Monday, November 28, 1966

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, informs Senator Robert F. Kennedy that Dr. King has accepted the invitation to appear before the subcommittee on Executive Reorganization.

Letter from Marian Hargrave to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963

Ms. Hargrave offers her support for Dr. King and his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. She also discusses the religious aspects of the struggle, which she feels give it a deeper meaning.

Community Service Committee Presents MLK

The Community Service Committee of Oakwood College presents Dr. King as its guest speaker in an upcoming event.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."

On Being A Good Neighbor

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.