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Fort Valley State College Vesper Program

Sunday, October 23, 1955

This program outlines the events of a service held at Fort Valley State College in Georgia and notes Dr. King as the keynote speaker.

Letter from Baptist World Alliance to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Baptist World Alliance Church expresses its gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to the Amsterdam Conference, and follows up with a reminder of his promise to consider an invitation from Scandinavia.

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

Man

Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

In this letter to Dr. King, Norman Thomas, a pacifist and political activist, writes to ensure that he attend a small civil rights conference in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Grace Pruitt to Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, December 15, 1966

Grace Pruitt writes to Ms. McDonald informing her that the American Friends Service Committee does not have a large enough stock of "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" to send her 200 copies.

Thank You Letter From MLK to Mrs. Helen N. Ceder

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mrs. Helen Ceder's contribution to Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He acknowledges that her support assists with many important projects such as voter registration and eradication of ghettos in the North.

Immortality

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the subject of immortality.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Letter from Rev. Pavel Titera to MLK

Saturday, December 11, 1965

Pavel Titera responds to a letter from Dr. King, in which he expressed his hope for a coming to visit. Titera sends well wishes for Dr. King and his family, and encloses a photograph of his family "as a token of the brotherly love."

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967

Maurice Dawkins informs Dr. King that their meeting is being followed up with action in various regions and with cooperation of the OEO Regional Directors and Civil Rights Coordinators.

Letter from MLK to Joel Crittenden

Dr. King responds to Joel Crittenden's concern about white hatred toward Negroes by making two points: 1) some whites have given their lives in the freedom struggle, and 2) hatred and violence must be met with love and nonviolence.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1968

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Letter from Eva Rosenfeld to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Eva Rosenfeld writes Dr. King expressing her support of his stance on the Vietnam War, regardless of critics like the NAACP. She asserts that King's mentality is wise and "that hope for all of us lies in seeing these issues as one issue, an issue of our humanity."

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Sin (Isaiah)

Dr. King highlights the topic of sin, according to the Book of Isaiah.

Letter from Eleanor Martin to MLK

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Eleanor Martin, a Sunday school teacher at Triedstone Baptist Church, praises Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love." She also invites Dr. King to visit her Sunday school class when he visits Cleveland again.

Letter from Mrs. King to Ms. Dixie Lee Kisor Regarding Home Helper Position

Saturday, June 22, 1963

In this letter dated 6/22/63, Mrs. King informs Ms. Kisor of her decision not to employ her as a home-helper. She and Dr. King believe it would be in the best interest of the children to have someone who would be available on a permanent basis.

Letter from Shirley Bird to Miss Sander

Monday, February 19, 1962

Ms. Bird discusses Dr. King's lecture appearance at the University of Texas. Dr. King's lecture was entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Letter from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

This is a handwritten note from Mrs. Barbara Gonye to Dr. King questioning his position as a "Man of God" and a "Man of Peace". She also accuses Dr. King of having hate and being a troublemaker.

Letter from Rabbi Jacob M. Rothschild

Monday, January 9, 1967

This letter is an invitation from Rabbi Rothschild to the Eighteenth Annual Institute for the Christian Clergy. Throughout the letter the Rabbi outlines the activities of the day and expresses his appreciation for all who will attend.

Introduction to an Educational Program on Nonviolence

Monday, September 26, 1966

This document explains the purpose of an educational program on nonviolence. The document then goes into specific details on the curriculum taught in the workshops for nonviolence.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

Telegram from Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. to the SCLC Board of Strategy

Sunday, March 31, 1968

Just three days before the assassination, Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. asserts that removing Dr. King from the SCLC would be disastrous.

Letter to S. R. Wise from MLK Regarding Anti-Semitism

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dr. King responds to a telegram inquiry about SCLC and anti-semitism. Dr. King continues on at length about Negro-Jewish relations, excerpting from his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Bernard Holliday to MLK

Monday, September 23, 1963

President of Ministers Alliance, Mr. Holliday writes to Dr. King to show his support for the tragic incident that took place September 15, 1963. They enclosed a check to the families that lost someone during this terrible event.

Presidential Invitation to White House Luncheon

Tuesday, June 5, 1962

President Kennedy invites Dr. King to attend a White House Luncheon on the occasion of the visit of Archbishop Makarios, the President of the Republic of Cyprus.