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The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Draft of a Speech Regarding the Chicago Freedom Movement

This is a draft copy of Dr. King's speech on the Chicago Freedom Movement. The intention of this movement is to end slums in Chicago. Dr. King calls upon the poverty-stricken Negro, the middle class Negro, and the white community for assistance with this movement. Dr. King also states that years after the March on Washington, he has seen his dream turn into a nightmare due to the murders of civil rights activists.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion" on temporal things so filling people's minds that they don't have room for the eternal. He contrasts this with pantheism. The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter White

Friday, September 10, 1965

Dora McDonald notifies Peter White, of the University of Western Ontario, that Dr. King is unable to accept any additional speaking engagements for the "next seven or eight months."

Man

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology” on man as the telos (purpose) of creation.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

Letter from Elder A. S. Grant to MLK

Monday, November 1, 1965

Elder A.S. Grant, a member of The West Indies Laymen National Christian League Church and State, writes a letter to Dr. King. Grant states the need for solidarity among global Black leaders, both church and state. He requests monetary donations that would go towards a headquarters for his organization.

Letter from MLK to Joe C. Sullivan Jr.

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dr. King thanks Joe Sullivan for his previous correspondence supporting the civil rights movement and the implementation of the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Dr. King expresses how he will use nonviolence against those who believe in segregation.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Friday, August 23, 1963

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

I Marched on Washington

Kelly E. Miller composed this poem for Dr. King as a tribute to the March on Washington.

Lalbahadur Shastri Stamp

This is a authentic postage stamp featuring Lalbahadur Shastri of India.

Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

MLK's Itinerary October-November 1958

Dated 1958, this calendar lists a number of speaking engagements throughout the country scheduled for Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.

Letter from Robert G. Lippmann to MLK

Saturday, November 16, 1963

Robert G. Lippmann requests a copy of the sermon Dr. King delivered at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church for the funeral services of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Diane Wesley.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Maurice DeCuir to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this letter, Maurice De Cuir expresses his concern, in regard to race relations, as it pertains to government jobs in helping the economic status of the negro. He then informs Dr. King of the intent, of the Equal Opportunity Commission, to investigate the matter.

Telegram from MLK to Elijah Muhammed

Monday, August 14, 1967

Dr. King commends Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War. He encourages Elijah Muhammed to convince Ali to speak at the upcoming Tenth Annual Convention of SCLC.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Rejection Letter to Nusas Journal

Monday, May 24, 1965

Dr. King informs the editor of Nusas Journal that he will not be able to contribute an article.

Letter From Don Slaiman

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.

Flight Schedule Proposal for MLK and Party

Henderson Travel Service, Inc. created this suggested flight schedule for Dr. King, Ralph D. Abernathy, Andrew Young, Bernard Lee, and Dora McDonald.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Albert Weiss to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

A Wisconsin couple criticizes Dr. King for "outcries" against policy in Vietnam and the "so called peace movement."

SCLC Board Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This document is a proposed agenda for an SCLC board meeting, which includes Dr. King's notes of additional agenda items.

People to People: Going To Chicago

Saturday, January 15, 1966

This article appeared in Dr. King's weekly People to People column in the New York Amsterdam News. In it, he discusses the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations in the Chicago Movement.

The Word of God

Dr. King references Karl Barth on the "word of God."