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Theology

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Letter from T.J. Morrow to MLK

Monday, July 5, 1965

T.J. Morrow writes Dr. King in an effort to gain support for his film idea. Having already submitted it to a motion picture company and subsequently denied, Morrow hopes that King can help with promotion. He believes the film can offer positive messages of brotherhood and feels confident in its impact on society.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Letter from George Garabedian & Co. to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

George Garabedian writes Dr. King, pleased that he will be able to accommodate him and his group on their pilgrimage to Jerusalem.

Letter from Yolinda Pelmore to MLK

Friday, December 8, 1967

Yolinda Pelmore, a young student, asks Dr. King how he became famous. The reading theme for her class prompted her to write.

Letter from Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Democratic Congressman Charles Longstreet Weltner asks Dr. King to help with a project that will commemorate the 200th anniversary of US independence. Weltner requests that Dr. King write a letter in which he discusses the problems that democracy will face in the coming decade. Weltner also encloses a related document entitled, "A Proposal for the Formation of a Committee of Correspondence."

Scientific Method

Dr. King discusses the scientific method according to Henry Nelson Wieman's "Issues of Life."

Letter from Merle B. Foreman to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

Merle B. Foreman is writing to Dr. King in hopes of receiving an autograph. She also encloses a self addressed stamped envelope.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Martin J. Morand, Vice-President of the Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg, inquires about Dr. King's availability to serve as a guest speaker at a late 1964 meeting in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Vernal G. Cave to MLK

Thursday, November 21, 1963

Vernal G. Cave informs Dr. King of a cousin's passing and contributes to the SCLC in his memory.

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

Letter from Bernard Edelman to MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Bernard Edelman, a former supporter of Dr. King and the SCLC, expresses his objection to Dr. King's stance on Vietnam.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Program From MLK's Nobel Peace Prize Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

This is the program from a Recognition Dinner honoring Dr. King sponsored by the Citizens of Atlanta following his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. It took place at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel and included an address by Dr. King.

Dedication Page (Edited Draft) for "Why We Can't Wait"

Dr. King drafted this dedication page for his children, in his book, "Why We Can't Wait." Similar to the famous quote in his "I Have A Dream" speech, the dedication hoped that his children "would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character."

Letter from MLK to Rev. L. C. Henegan

Thursday, October 9, 1958

Dr. King thanks Rev. L. C. Henegan for his generous contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

SCLC: Tenth Annual Convention

This program denotes the key leaders for the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC held in Jackson, Mississippi. It also outlines the timeline of events for the four-day convention, noting a foreword written by Dr. King.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Letter From George Patton Jr. to MLK

George Patton expresses his disdain to Dr. King about the names that whites call "Black Americans" and offers a list of names that blacks should be "referred to as."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

MLK Speaker's Contract

Monday, April 3, 1967

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Sin

Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Justification (Ritschl)

Dr. King quotes Albert Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Oppositional Letter to MLK

A critic of Dr. King advises him to help his supporters purchase birth control instead of focusing on civil rights.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.