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"God's Judgment on Western Civilization"

The document contains notes for a sermon given by Dr. King entitled, "God's Judgement on Western Civilization."

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
California (CA)

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Fiske regarding the topic of immortality.

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
California (CA)

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.

Theology and Science

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as a source on theology and science.

Letter from Harry J. Cargas to MLK Regarding The Queen's Work

Tuesday, November 19, 1963
Missouri (MO)

The editor of "The Queen's Work," a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society, sends Dr. King a copy of the December issue. The editor informs Dr. King that the magazine goes out to twenty thousand Catholic high school students around the nation, and this issue's focus on interracial justice should interest Dr. King.

Letter from Alice Parham to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
Virginia (VA)

Ms. Palhom writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph and personal information about him for her government class.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt T. Walker to Samual Weston

Monday, April 30, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Wyatt T. Walker and Dr. King sent this telegram to Samual Weston informing him that they were requesting an investigation of his complaint.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK

Memphis, TN

An anonymous person wrote this letter to Dr. King, telling him that he is "directly responsible" for the murder of a 16 year old boy in Memphis, Tennessee.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York, NY

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Whitehead's Doctrine of Freedom

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead’s doctrine of freedom as described in “Science and the Modern World.”

Letter from Thomas Maloney to Dora McDonald

Saturday, May 22, 1965
ITALY

Rev. Maloney thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance and the materials that she sent.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

Wednesday, January 1, 1964
Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

Arnobius

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

Dr. King gives information on fourth century teacher, Arnobius and his conversion to Christianity.

Letter from Richard V. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962
Florida (FL)

Mr. Richard Moore invites Dr. King to speak at the Baccalaureate Commencement of Bethune-Cookman College in Florida.

Otherworldliness

Dr. King quotes the Epistle of Clement and Friedrich von Hügel's "Eternal Life."

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Letter from S. Leiss to MLK

Saturday, March 6, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

The Joan Daves Agency sends Dr. King a check from Oxford University Press for royalties associated with the reprint of "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in Alpheus T. Mason's "Free Government in the Making."

Letter Dated 2/1/63 from Frank Elliott to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963
New York, NY, Brooklyn, NY

Frank Elliot is writing to notify Dr. King that he has received the revised sermon "Antidotes of Fear," and it will be in the galley proofs. Elliot states that the galley proofs will be sent to Dr. King's office no later than Feburary 7th. He wants to meet with Dr. King to discuss any problems that may arise.

God

Dr. King references the book of Job by discussing the immense and power of God.

The Hard or the Easy Way?

Thursday, October 5, 1961
Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Arkansas (AR), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council discusses the topics of school segregation and integration in specific southern states and counties, especially Yancey County, North Carolina.

Letter from Laurence Kirkpatrick to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The World Convention of Churches of Christ is requesting a photo and biography of Dr. King to use for publicity purposes at their Seventh Assembly where Dr. King will be in attendance.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Tallahassee, FL, Montgomery, AL

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI)

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Selma, AL

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an issue of Cuadernos, which printed a Spanish version of his Berlin address about President Kennedy. A copy of "Why We Can't Wait" is sold to Figaro Litteraire.