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Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, April 9, 1967

Dr. King states that the key to an extended and fulfilling life is to live a life that is "three dimensional." He further identifies these dimensions as: "length, breadth and height." Dr. King proclaims these dimensions will ensure a life of self-love, community and love for God.

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King drafted the intro of this sermon to place emphasis on the pros and cons of despair. The place and date of where this sermon was preached is not known.

Letter from George F. Berlinger to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Mrs. George Berlinger of the Nathan Hofheimer Foundation, informs Dr. King that the organization will not be including the SCLC in their budget. The Nathan Hofheimer Foundation sought to improve the living conditions of the underprivileged.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Harry Walker summarizes a recent conversation he held with Dora McDonald, Mrs. Tobye Karl, and Particia Hederman that outlined the dates of future speaking engagements for Dr. King.

Promotional Ad in Publisher's Weekly for "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, March 8, 1964

This ad, published in Publisher's Weekly, serves to promote Dr.King's book "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine to MLK

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Time Magazine's Otto Fuerbringer informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King's picture is apart of a traveling Time cover exhibit. He pledges to forward copies of Dr. King's family portrait.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Orville Freeman to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

The author informs Dr. King of the efforts being made to adequately address the issues pertaining to nutritional health in the country.

Letter from Walter P. Reuther to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964

Walter P. Reuther extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as a member of the Executive Committee for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

City of Cleveland: Division of Housing Codes

The City of Cleveland Division of Housing Codes lists the general maintenance requirements surrounding the local living environments. These qualifications specify premises must be free from infestation of pests and maintained in a clean and sanitary condition. This is the responsibility of both the owner and occupant, and offense penalties will be enforced. Dr. King creates notes surrounding these codes, which involves the 14th amendment, Declaration of Independence and more.

Letter from Postal Worker to MLK

An anonymous postal worker requests that Dr. King write a letter to the regional director of the Atlanta Post Office concerning discriminatory employment practices.

Transcendence and Immanence of God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 23:23, and he provides his interpretation of the biblical passage.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Letter from R. Abraham to MLK

Saturday, September 20, 1958

R. Abraham sends this get-well letter to Dr. King wishing a full recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital. Also enclosed is a gift in appreciation for Dr. King's work for humanity.

Transcript of MLK Appearance on WINS Radio

Sunday, May 31, 1964

This document is a 1964 transcript of a WINS Radio interview with Dr. King. The focus is the Civil Rights Bill.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Evil

Dr. King references the concept of evil.

Letter from Clarence E. Duffy to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Rev. Duffy expresses his religious and political concerns with Dr. King as he considers a potential presidential campaign in 1968.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

Letter from Leila Robins to MLK

Mrs. Robins thanks Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. She and her fellow Canadians who object to their government supplying the United States with arms are particularly glad to hear him speak out against the war.

Pledge for Peace Campaign

Mr. Karno and Mr. Saunders request assistance for their Pledge for Peace campaign. This campaign specifically targets the economy through the automotive industry. "I hereby pledge not to buy a new car until there is peace in Vietnam".

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Letter from TIME Magazine to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

James Shepley, publisher of TIME Magazine, thanks Dr. King for his editorial contributions to the magazine in the past year.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Letter from J. Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

J. Smith states that Dr. King is a hypocrite who will be punished by God. Smith believes Dr. King to be a Communist agitator who is undeserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Smith concludes by warning Dr. King to cease his movement or he will be plagued with death just like John F. Kennedy.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King quotes a segment of Professor John Baille's work regarding self-consciousness and God.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Letter Envelope from MLK, Addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber

This envelope is addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from SANE's Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Dr. Benjamin Spock requests the support of the SCLC for "A Rally for Peace in Vietnam." Dr. Spock informs Dr. King, that the rally will advocate for immediate actions concerning the war in Vietnam.