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Letter from Douglas B. Leeds to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Douglas Leeds, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at Babson Institute of Business Administration, writes Dr. King to request any information regarding his political views. He also invites Dr. King to speak at the Institute in the future.

Letter from W.T. Durr to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Pastor Durr donates funds to help Dr. King and his efforts of nonviolence.

Helen Meun Addresses the Arlington Demonstration

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Helen Meun writes to members of the SCLC and explains that those involved in the Arlington demonstration were unaware to its purpose. Furthermore, she suggests that the children who were harmed during this demonstration be given an explanation.

MLK Statement in Support of Labor Union

Thursday, June 11, 1959

This 1959 statement on behalf of the United Packing House Workers Union is one of many Dr. King wrote supporting unions and the Labor Movement.

Letter from Robert M. Hatch to MLK

Friday, April 9, 1965

Rev. Hatch of the Diocese of Western Massachusetts responds to Dr. King's request for "financial assistance" on behalf of SCLC. Rev. Hatch cheerfully tells Dr. King that the Diocesan Council has agreed to answer the request favorably, and he references an enclosed check for two thousand dollars.

Letter from Eugene Jackson to MLK

Sunday, August 13, 1967

Eugene Jackson expresses his amazement with Dr. King's superb performance during his interview on "Meet the Press."

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

Saturday, February 18, 1967

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

White Backlash Growing

Friday, August 26, 1966

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

Letter from Melvin Brisk to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Melvin Brisk, President of Quadrangle Books, requests that Dr. King read Clarence Darrow's book "Verdicts Out of Court." Brisk acknowledges Dr. King's limited time schedule and urges him to pursue a meeting with Darrow to discuss his publication.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

Letter Dated 12/4/62 from MLK's Secretary to Melvin Arnold

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Melvin Arnold, Miss Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, informed Mr. Arnold that Dr. King was still working on his sermons for publication. She also stated that Dr. King had a meeting later that afternoon on December 12, 1962 and would like to scheduled a meeting with Rev. Wallis for earlier that day.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King receives this letter from U.S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding his testimony outlining his position on civil rights before the House Judiciary Committee.

Temporary Injunction Filed Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

This is a legal document for a temporary injunction filed by the city of Birmingham against Wyatt Tee Walker.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend N. C. Burtenshaw

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Dr. King sends his condolences for the death of Archbishop Paul Hallinan.

Letter from Roland Gammon to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

Roland Gammon requests an interview with Dr. King for a sequel to Faith Is A Star, a book about the role faith has played in the lives of prominent Americans. The sequel will focus on world leaders.

Poster: This Store Is Against Equal Opportunities for Negroes

The SCLC placed this type of boycott poster on the storefronts of businesses that refused to provide equal job opportunities to Negroes.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce of Time Magazine

Thursday, January 16, 1964

Dr. King thanks Henry Luce of Time magazine for naming him "Man of the Year." However, Dr. King believes that this honor is shared among the millions of individuals who committed themselves to the struggle for civil rights. Dr. King also acknowledges Luce for publishing the accomplishments of Negro professionals.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

Telegram from Curtis W. Harris to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 5, 1965

Curtis Harris, President of the Virginia State unit of the SCLC, asks Miss McDonald to confirm some scheduled dates that have been previously discussed with Dr. King.

Agenda for the Leadership Conference Executive Committee Meeting

Arnold Aronson sends the agenda for an upcoming meeting for the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference. Important topics of discussion include the Civil Rights Act of 1967 and the Freedom Budget.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins writes Dr. King requesting that Southern Christian Leadership affiliates overflow senators with messages promoting support.

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Letter from MLK to Earl T. Jefferson

Monday, January 15, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Jefferson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and briefly describes the organization's principles and efforts.

Letter from Ryan & Ebert Law Firm to the SCLC about Will of Carl A. Ryan

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King and the SCLC, the Executives of the Ryan, Ryan & Ebert Law Firm reward the organization with a check for $960.00 on behalf of the last Will and Testament of Carl A. Ryan

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

MLK Lauds Roy Wilkins for His Work with the NAACP

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Dr. King honors Roy Wilkins for not only his efforts in the NAACP, but also his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Eulogy for Sixteenth Street Baptist Church Victims

This is Dr. King?s eulogy for three of the four young girls killed in the 1963 bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. God gives man the right to exercise good and evil, King says, but God wills that everything will happen for the good ? that out of tragedy comes redemption. Martyred in the struggle for freedom, the girls have become symbols of the crusade and of the faith that sustains it. King speaks of forgiving those who murdered the girls and the need to transform the system, the way of life, and the philosophy that led to the bombing.