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"MOZAMBIQUE"

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook regrets that Dr. King has refused to reveal the names of individuals affiliated with Communist activities throughout the United States. Mr. Cook states that he will continue to investigate the file on his own accord.

God

Dr. King quotes a passage from "The Historic Faith and a Changing World," by Norman Pittenger.

Letter from Ellen G. Clarke to MLK about Information Request

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Ellen Clarke, a student at St. Andrews College in North Carolina, requests the opportunity to meet with Dr. King and gather information about the SCLC, which she will then use in a school panel on religion and politics.

10th Anniversary SCLC Convention Program

This document contains a program for the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention hosted by Rev. Howard Creecy, President of the Atlanta Affiliate Chapter of the SCLC. The theme of the convention is "Where Do We Go From Here?"

New Housing Developments - West

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

Servetus, Michael

Dr. King writes biographical notes about Michael Servetus, a citizen of Spain known for his study of medicine and theology. Servetus was burned at the stake because of his anti-Trinitarian views.

New York Times: US Judge Forbids A House Inquiry; Panel is Defiant

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

This article discusses the decision of a federal judge, ordering the House Committes of Un-American Activities to not hold a hearing on a bill that would make it illegal for Americans to aid the Vietcong.

Racism in the United States

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Letter from Aguedo Mojica Marrero to MLK

Friday, March 10, 1967

Tthe Vice President of the Puerto Rican House of Representatives requests copies of the speech given by Dr. King to the Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam.

New Wine in New Bottles

Dr. King outlines a sermon he preached at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery on October 17, 1954. His text is Matthew 9:17. He compares new ideas to new wine, stating that an idea cannot progress if people are not ready to accept it; this is what it means for an idea to be before its time. New ideas require new structures to contain them. The same is true in our personal lives when we resolve to rid ourselves of bad habits.

Letter from Edmund W. Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, September 27, 1967

Edmund W. Gordon, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance at Yeshiva University, invites Dr. King to serve on the Dr. W.E.B. DuBois memorial committee. The committee proposes a memorial park to honor Dr. DuBois in his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

Letter from Elder A. S. Grant to MLK

Monday, November 1, 1965

Elder A.S. Grant, a member of The West Indies Laymen National Christian League Church and State, writes a letter to Dr. King. Grant states the need for solidarity among global Black leaders, both church and state. He requests monetary donations that would go towards a headquarters for his organization.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from E. P. and M. C. King to President Johnson

Saturday, July 29, 1967

The Kings write President Johnson to discuss their dissatisfaction that neither Dr. King nor Charles Evers was appointed a member of the Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

Letter from Laurie Bush to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Laurie Bush writes to Dr. King requesting information about the Civil Rights Movement for his or her research paper.

God Nature

Dr. King sketches his thoughts on Saint Thomas Aquinas' "investigation of God's nature."

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Saturday, November 27, 1965

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Watson

Dr. King references behaviorist John B. Watson regarding man's behavior.

Letter from James McDaniel to MLK

Monday, October 31, 1966

This appreciation letter from James A McDaniel, thanks Dr. King for his willingness to serve as a member on the Executive Committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

Copyright Agreement for MLK’s Nobel Lecture

This is the Copyright Assignment Agreement established between Dr. King and the Nobel Foundation.

Homeric Problem

Dr. King briefly outlines the problem surrounding the work of the Greek poet Homer. The note card references the view of German scholar and critic Friedrich August Wolf and documents two primary theories regarding Homeric literature.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

How Urban League Helps City on Day-to-Day Basis

Friday, November 5, 1965

In this article, the council, activities, and contributions of the Urban League are discussed. Edwin C. Berry, the league's executive secretary, believes that contributions have decreased due to the league's refusal to take a stand against civil rights demonstrations. Mr. Berry is hopeful that contributors will return their support to make Chicago a "hallmark of democracy."

Article regarding MLK

This article highlights Dr. Kings affiliation with the "New Left" Conference held in Chicago, Illinois.

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

Aristotle

Dr. King cites Aristotle's ideas regarding matter and form.