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Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK about CORE National Convention

Thursday, June 11, 1964
New York, NY

This response letter dated June 11, 1964, was sent from Ms. McDonald, secretary of Dr. King to Mr. James Farmer. She states that while Dr. King will not be able to attend the CORE National Convention, he will send a representative from the SCLC to the meeting.

Covenant Between Operation Breadbasket and The A&P Company

Chicago, IL

The Chicago Unit of The A&P Company seeks to build a relationship with the Negro community by implementing equal opportunity employment policies. In return, the ministers of Operation Breadbasket will bring to attention the extensive commitment the A&P Company has to the economic and social future of the Negro community.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).

Letter to the Managers of "Christianity Today'' from Rev Earl E. Josten

Saturday, June 17, 1967
Iowa (IA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, dated June 17, 1967, Josten writes to the managers of "Christianity Today" to inform them that he cannot comply with their request for names. He is not complying because of the attitude Christianity Today's editor is taking toward Dr. King. Rev. Josten is a pastor at The Methodist Church in Columbus Junction, Iowa. Josten offers prayer to the editor for his "terrible tirade" against King, and states that he will not commend this paper to any more friends if this attitude continues.

Letter from Jesse Thomas to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ)

Jessie Thomas is writing to Dr. King to promote the development of a new urban community in the Rockdale area of Atlanta. Mr. Thomas states that the development would be revolutionary and a model for other cities if it were to be approved by the housing authorities. He urges Dr. King to support the project and help in the planning of producing this new area.

Letter from Paul Stagg to MLK

Monday, April 22, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Paul Stagg, Program Director of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, invites Dr. King to attend their convention along with a delegation of pastors from around the country. One of the highly anticipated sessions of the convention centers around the theme, "The Gospel in a World of Revolution."

Letter from Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967
Oregon (OR), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis invite Dr. King to speak to the students at University of Oregon.

Miracle

Dr. King references the Old Testament Biblical Book of Numbers regarding the topic of miracles.

God the Inescapable

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the topic "God the Inescapable." King speaks about man attempting to hide from God, but ultimately expresses that this impossible to do.

Telegram from John Moore to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
Boston, MA

John Moore questions Dr. King's Vietnam stance by suggesting that it harms the Civil Rights Movement.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story

Monday, December 31, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This dramatic story gives a riveting account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott movement and its aim to end segregation of the public transit in Montgomery, Alabama after the arrest of Rosa Parks. E.D. Nixon and other ministers illustrate the philosophy of nonviolent tactics employed by the Montgomery Improvement Association and their struggle for "cosmic companionship."

God, Man, Sin, and Knowledge

Presented here is a series of notecards that defines an array of topics relating to philosophical and theological perspectives.

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Papal Infallibility

Dr. King defines papal infallibility.

Letter from Joan Daves to Hoki Ishihara

Monday, August 24, 1964
New York (NY), Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves encloses a copy of a manuscript of the proposed speech to be given in Berlin by Dr. King. Daves also indicates the fifty-dollar fee for the one-time publication of Dr. King's comments about the late President Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Monday, December 28, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King thanks Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council for his efforts during Dr. King's visit to Sweden. Dr. King also requests the names of others who he should thank.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. Gosta Dahl

Thursday, June 11, 1964
GERMANY, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden

In this letter, dated June 11, 1964 to Mr. Gosta Dahl, Joan Daves expresses the importance of "Why We Can't Wait" and why they feel it is a "...potentially more successful" work than Dr. King's other two books. Accordingly, they request minimum advance and royalty schedules. She asks that Mr. Dahl check with the Swedish publishers to see if they would raise their offer, for the use of Dr. King's work.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Tuesday, April 16, 1968
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

Letter from W. F. Washington to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), VIETNAM

Rev. Washington assures Dr. King that he has his support as a fellow minister for his stand on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Albany, GA

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Christianity and Civilization

Dr. King records a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's "Civilization on Trial" and the view that "religious progress comes through the birth and death of civilization."

Resolutions of Institute on Non-Violent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959
Atlanta, GA

This document contains SCLC resolutions of July 22-24, 1959, regarding nonviolence. The resolutions include: commending the 50th Anniversary Convention of the NAACP, thanking the staff of Spelman College, and calling upon organizations to "initiate plans against forms of racial discrimination."

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), GERMANY, Washington, D.C.

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Lenin

The role of State in Society is described as Dr. King documents a quote from the book "The State and Revolution" written by Vladimir Lenin.

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
NETHERLANDS

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

Thursday, March 31, 1966
SWEDEN, EGYPT, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Chicago, IL, Louisville, KY

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Thomas Wilkins to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Thomas Wilkins suggests that Dr. King consider pursuing an initiative against taxation in Alabama. He proposes that any Negro who is refused voter registration should not pay any taxes in the state.