Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Maine (ME)"

Sermon on Conformity Thought "Nonconformist - J. Bond"

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King in this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church speaks to his congregation on the topic of disent. He expresses in detail about how we essentially must not conform to standards set by society.

Man

Dr. King records one atheist’s perspective on man.

Plea for Assistance from Lucille Griffin to MLK

Saturday, September 3, 1966

In this letter, Lucille Griffin asked for Dr. King's aid in obtaining satisfaction regarding an insurance dispute resulting from a home damaging storm.

Letter from Mary R. Hunt to Mrs.King Regarding Recommendation for Employment

Monday, May 27, 1963

Ms. Hunt, Director of the Extramural Department for Antioch College, sends Mrs. King the resume and photo of Dixie Lee Kisor for employment consideration.

For Healing of The Nations

Sunday, February 14, 1954

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

Thursday, January 25, 1968

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

"Race Hate and Divisiveness"

This newspaper clipping depicts Dr. King's decision to move the civil rights movement up north as "one of grave peril to everyone concerned." The author believes that the defiance of the law could cause disaster for the Negro cause.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Telegram from Agnes Milthers to MLK

Friday, October 16, 1964

Agnes Milthers, a member of the Danish sections of Women International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Letter from Miss Shirley Wright to Mrs. King

Thursday, February 3, 1966

Mrs. King writes Shirley Wright of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, thanking her for the copy of the "We Shall Overcome" record.

Letter from MLK to William Smith

Monday, July 13, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Smith for his contribution of $50 to the SCLC. He updates him on how much money was raised at a recent reception and details how it will be used. Dr. King also sends a copy of his latest book as an expression of appreciation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Jainism

Dr. King notes a quote regarding the philosophy of Jainism.

Fifth Anniversary Observance

Sunday, February 14, 1965

This is a draft of the program for the fifth anniversary observance for Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild.

Letter from Rev. T.Y. Rogers to SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Rev. Rogers writes to SCLC affiliates in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi informing them that Dr. King, Rev. Ralph Abernathy, and others will begin serving a 5-day jail sentence in Jefferson County Jail for violating an injunction forbidding them to march on Good Friday or Easter Sunday. He requests that all affiliates meet in Birmingham, Alabama to show support.

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Letter from Don DuMont to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965

Mr. DuMont expresses his disapproval of Dr. King's leadership of the negro race and the association of the movement with Christianity, because he seeks proof that Dr. King's movement is not "Communist-inspired." Dumont was an evangelist who ran unsuccessfully for a variety of political offices.

Suffering

Dr. King writes that the view of suffering in Job 20 is fallacious.

Letter from M. G. Gilligan to MLK and James Baldwin

Saturday, July 6, 1963

Mrs. M. G. Gilligan expresses admiration to Dr. King and Mr. Baldwin for the production of the television program entitled "Perspectives."

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Letter From Elaine Kennedy to MLK Regarding the Media

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

In this document Kennedy, a medical secretary, writes to Dr. King expressing her political concern in reference to the use of racial designations in the media.

Letter From a Very Concerned Christian to MLK

The Christian author of this letter includes a poem to express concern and anguish regarding the War in Vietnam.

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

Friday, December 2, 1966

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

Housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia

Wednesday, June 24, 1959

This document discusses the critical need of housing for Negroes in Atlanta, Georgia. The role of Atlanta Urban League and the federal Housing Administration in seeking housing for Negroes are discussed and unpublished Commission on Race and Housing reports are exposed that illustrate housing discrimination in Atlanta between 1945 and 1958.

Letter from Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dana McLean Greeley, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, asks Dr. King to lend his name to a letter addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The letter, which was drafted at the request of the Inter-Religious Peace Conference, requests an interview with President Johnson. Dr. King's handwriting appears on the top right of this letter, saying that he would be happy to allow them to use his name in this context.

An Interview With MLK

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Meeting on National Negro Politics

Sunday, March 31, 1968

The Meeting on National Negro Politics highlights congressional races with "the most potential for political gains by black Americans" in the 1968 elections.