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Letter from Delight S. Gordon to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Ms. Gordon urges Dr. King to use his influence as a great leader to persuade Negros not to condone the actions of Adam Clayton Powell.

Goldwater's Nomination

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

MLK/SCLC Fundraising Letter and Response

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Bruce and Gertrude joins send their support and contribution on the back of the SCLC fundraising letter they received. They refer to the "old sociological truth that one cannot keep a person in the gutter without needing to stay in there himself to keep the other down there," and thank Dr. King for leadership that liberates both Negro and White.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Benjamin E. Mays Regarding Meeting

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

In this letter to Benjamin Mays, the president of Morehouse College, Dora McDonald state that Dr. King will be in attendance at their meeting on December 19, 1962.

Letter from Percy A. Blackburn to Ed Clayton

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Percy A. Blackburn refers to a previous letter Alice Bucher, president of S. J. Bucher Ltd. Lucerne sent Ed Clayton, SCLC Director of Public Relations, concerning their book about the History of the American Negro. Blackburn encloses a "resume of the proposed contents of the book." He also informs Mr. Clayton of Mrs. Bucher and her associate's current visit to the US and that they would like to arrange an appointment with Dr. King at his convenience.

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

Habakkuk

This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

Letter from Miles W. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Pacific Northwest Conference invites Dr. King to speak at the 1968 conference dinner. The conference will be held at the Methodist Church and will present civil rights spokesman Bishop Everett W. Palmer.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Unsigned Memo to Arthur Shores

Monday, November 6, 1967

In this memo to Mr. Shores, the author wants to get an update status on eight clients that served sentences in Birmingham for parading without a permit. Dr. King was sent a copy of the memo.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Letter from Reverend C. William Billingslea to MLK

Tuesday, July 24, 1962

Reverend C. William Billingslea notifies Dr. King that the Northern Christian Leadership Conference wants to assist the movement through mass rallies, speeches, fund-raising, etc. Reverend Billingslea also asks Dr. King to provide a Freedom Fighter to come and speak to the organization.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Richard M. Austin

Friday, February 2, 1968

William A. Rutherford, Executive Director of the SCLC, requests that Rev. Austin join a SCLC support committee. The support committee will offer assistance to the SCLC's upcoming campaign in Washington, D.C.

Anticommunist Flyer

This flyer suggests that the U.N. consists of communists Jews. Several contacts are provided for Americans to receive support and be educated about Communism.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

H.D. Bollinger requests Dr. King's appearance at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference at the Methodist Student Movement in Nebraska. Mr. Bollinger informs Dr. King that the students are "very anxious" to have him as a principle speaker. The theme of the conference will be "The Church in the World." The church is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and ensures him that they will provide an honorarium if he were to accept this speaking engagement.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Letter to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Dr. King receives a letter confirming the telephone call that informed him that he won the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. The author then invites Dr. King to come to Oslo to receive the prize.

Letter to MLK from Stanley Rice

Thursday, September 21, 1967

In this letter, Vice President Stanley Rice writes to Dr. King thanking him for subscribing to the United Business Service.

Invitation from the Government of Barbados to MLK

The Government of Barbados invite Dr. King and Coretta Scott King to the Celebrations to Mark the Independence of Barbados. This event held high historical importance due Barbados' inquiry for independence for many years.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

A Tribute to the Organized Labor Movement

Tuesday, March 1, 1960

The Jewish Labor Committee extends heartfelt gratitude to the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) for twenty-five years of fraternal cooperation.

Letter from Rosa Lockett Reodus to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966

Reodus invites Dr. King to speak at the Progressive Community Church in Chicago and offers a small donation from the church in support of his cause.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Letter from 19 Year Old Swedish Boy to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Bo Blideman requests information on ways to join and assist the Civil Rights Movement during his upcoming stay in America.