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Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967
NETHERLANDS, VIETNAM

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, CONGO / ZAIRE, BELGIUM, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

The Student Mobilizer: Build Vietnam Week!

VIETNAM, Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY), PUERTO RICO, Detroit, MI, Ohio (OH), Los Angeles, CA

Focusing on the Vietnam War, this issue of The Student Mobilizer covers topics concerning student mobilizations to protest the war, regional meetings, and the organization of a Vietnam Week to help drum up public support and awareness.

CEP News

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), New York (NY), Tennessee (TN), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

I've Been To The Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, EGYPT, GREECE, Johannesburg, South Africa, KENYA, GHANA, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Jackson, MS, Birmingham, AL, CHINA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, GERMANY, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), UNITED KINGDOM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CANADA, Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King delivers the "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, TN.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

GHANA, ISRAEL

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Telegram from Truman Douglass to MLK about Pending Letter

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

This telegram was sent to Dr. King from Truman D. Douglass regarding an upcoming telegram pertaining to nine conditions set forth in an earlier letter. Douglass is the Chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Notes for Darien Interfaith Human Rights Council Youth Program

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Leaders of the Darien Interfaith Human Rights Council outline a brief youth program to be held one afternoon in the Royle School, in which a video tape of one of Dr. King's speeches will be played for the students in attendance.

The Future of Integration

Wednesday, November 11, 1959
Iowa (IA), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the issue of the Future of Integration to an assembly at the State University of Iowa on November 11, 1959.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

Letter from J. Smith to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964
California (CA)

J. Smith states that Dr. King is a hypocrite who will be punished by God. Smith believes Dr. King to be a Communist agitator who is undeserving of the Nobel Peace Prize. Smith concludes by warning Dr. King to cease his movement or he will be plagued with death just like John F. Kennedy.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED KINGDOM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, MOZAMBIQUE, SOUTH AFRICA, Johannesburg, South Africa, INDIA

As Dr. King reflects on his acceptance of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, he draws a parallel to the American Negroes' nonviolent approach to civil rights and the people of India, Africa, and elsewhere throughout the world. King argues that "humanity's desperate need for peace and progress to move into the truly civilized world of the future" will ultimately derive from adherence to non-violence.

Telegram from Frederick Dennard to MLK

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Reverend Frederick Dennard, Executive Director of the Harlem Interfaith Counseling Service, invites Dr. King to speak at a fundraising banquet.

Job

Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from C. I. C. Bosanquet to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967
London, England, Atlanta, GA

C. I. C Bosanquet, Vice Chancellor of the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, expresses delight in Dr. King upcoming visit to receive an honorary Doctor of Civil Law degree. He sends Dr. King a lists possible transportation options from London to the university and inquires about the length of his stay.

Letter from Yolinda Pelmore to MLK

Friday, December 8, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Yolinda Pelmore, a young student, asks Dr. King how he became famous. The reading theme for her class prompted her to write.

Royalty Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

Thursday, July 25, 1963
London, England

The document shown here is a book royalty statement for Dr. King's first book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from a Soldier to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

In one of a series of letters to Dr. King, "Private Friend" seeks further advice from Dr. King on how to combat the discrimination he faces in the Army. Friend's response to Dr. King from an earlier correspondence provides detailed information regarding the sentencing structure of the unfair charges against him.

Letter from Silvio Romoaldo to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
BRAZIL, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Silvio Romoaldo sends Dr. King his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the efforts against the Vietnam War.

Tentative Schedule for MLK

Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Baltimore, MD, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Cleveland, OH, Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL

This document outlines Dr. King's tentative schedule of cities and states he will tour.

Letter from Martin Segal to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Martin Segal, the Dinner Chairman of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King asking him to attend the NUL's Equal Opportunity Dinner and accept membership on the dinner's honorary committee. Writing by Dorothy Cotton, Dr. King's assistant, appears at the top right, stating this was the same day that Dr. King would be attending President Johnson's White House Conference in Washington, D.C.

Order Form: These Are Our Children

Washington, D.C.

This order form depicts a photograph of children of varying races at the 1960 White House Conference on Children and Youth.

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966
New York, NY

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Schleiermacher (Definition of Theology)

Dr. King quotes and interprets Friedrich Schleiermacher's definition of dogmatic theology in "The Christian Faith."

Condolences to the Wife of Theodore Trammell

Tuesday, March 20, 1962
Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker send condolences to Mrs. Theodore Trammell. They make a promise to rededicate themselves to the fight for human rights, just as her husband had done.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962
SOUTH AFRICA

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Telegram from Mrs. Mary L. Ayler to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL)

This telegram is an expression of support and encouragement from Mrs. Ayler of Murphysboro, IL, to Dr. King while he was incarcerated in Birmingham, Alabama.