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Meeting of Action Committee

Friday, March 22, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King sends a meeting notice to members of the SCLC Action Committee. He also includes a list of reports to be prepared concerning the Washington Mobilization.

Letter from Activist Carl Brannin to MLK

Sunday, January 6, 1963
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX

Social reformer and journalist Carl Brannin commends Dr. King's recent speech in Dallas. Brannin also discusses the importance of the Negro community voting in all elections and reports his experience as a poll tax deputy. He expresses frustration at recent elections that would have had different outcomes if the Negro vote had been strong and united.

Letter from Mose Pleasure, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968
Memphis, TN, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Pleasure writes Dr. King to inform him of his decision not to accept employment with SCLC. He refers to an earlier visit with Dr. King and friends in Atlanta, and comments that the group's enthusiasm bodes well for the upcoming Poor People's March on Washington.

Letter from MLK to Robert Maloney

Monday, March 4, 1963
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

Robert Maloney encloses a picture to Dr. King that he took of a young Virginia Boy Scout troop. Maloney was surprised that all the boys in the troop were African American.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Reverend Terrell

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York, NY

Dr.King expresses his deep appreciation to Union Baptist Church for their generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Clair Engle

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Clair Engle's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Robert Kyser to MLK

Thursday, March 14, 1968
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA

Robert Keyser, Coordinator of Choice '68 at Graceland College, writes Dr. King requesting campaign materials, just three weeks before his assassination. Choice '68 was the Time Magazine sponsored collegiate primary for the Presidential election in which Dr. King and Dr. Spock were encouraged to run as a ticket.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job regarding God's concern for man.

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

Letter from Charles Chew, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966
Chicago, IL

Charles Chew Jr., of the Chicago City Council, has invited Dr. King to join him for a radio interview regarding the topic of "Crash Program on Slums."

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Los Angeles, CA

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Letter from Larry Schneider to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ)

Larry Schneider informs Dr. King that he is available for assistance with "planning and implementing" Dr. King's efforts. He also offers his thoughts on a wide variety of issues affecting the American Negro.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Thursday, June 18, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
New York (NY), INDIA, ITALY, UNITED KINGDOM

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, outlines Dr. King's itinerary for a global trip that includes meeting with officials from Scotland, the Pope in Rome, and travelling to New Delhi.

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, January 24, 1968
New York, NY

Cass Canfield informs Dr. King that his company, Harper & Row Publishers Inc., won't publish Dr. Benjamin E Mays' book of memoirs.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

VIETNAM

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Letter from Alfred Hearin to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Alfred Hearin expresses to Dr. King that he admires him and that he has faith in his ability to help mankind. He then asks Dr. King to send him a handwritten letter and a photograph of himself for his collection.

Letter of Gratitude from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Maurice A. Dawkings, the Assistant Director for Civil Rights, expresses gratitude for the work Dr. King does.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Lowndes County, AL, Selma, AL, Jackson, MS, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Boston, MA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Religion (Its Inescapableness)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason" on religion as the "inescapable" bind between us and the universe.

MLK to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association

Thursday, March 26, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King gives a statement to the Second Precinct Clergymen's Association in Washington, D. C. regarding voter registration and the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts, "I understand that voter registration here has reached a mark just short of 170,000."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Leon H. Sullivan

Wednesday, October 31, 1962
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Rev. Leon Sullivan for visiting Atlanta and delivering a powerful message. Dr. King had asked Rev. Sullivan to come to Atlanta and meet with local ministers to discuss the selective patronage program Sullivan developed in Philadelphia. This program became the model for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Prayer

Dr. King notes William James' description of prayer.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
NETHERLANDS, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM, Atlanta, GA

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967
Florida (FL), New Jersey (NJ)

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.