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Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

Letter from Bill Baxter to Harry Belafonte

Friday, April 12, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Bill Baxter, a public school arts teacher, addressed this letter to entertainer Harry Belafonte, following the assassination of Dr. King. The content of the correspondence expressed great admiration towards the work of Dr. King and the talents of Mr. Belafonte. Mr. Belafonte was a trusted friend and adviser of Dr. King, during the civil rights movement.

Letter from The Charlotte News to MLK

Monday, January 3, 1966
North Carolina (NC), Tennessee (TN)

George Willhite, of The Charlotte News, asks Dr. King to comment on accusations of him being a communist. A reader had seen a photo of Dr. King at an allegedly communist school in Tennessee. Willhite asks Dr. King to explain the circumstances of the picture.

The Urban Coalition National Coordinator's Weekly Report

Friday, February 9, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Missouri (MO)

In the Urban Coalition's weekly report, the National Coordinator notifies members of the events that had occurred within the past week. The report covers local coalitions, legislation, private employment, and the steering committee.

God: Judeo-Christian View vs. Greek View

Dr. King cites a passage from the Old Testament book of Psalms to compare and contrast the Jewish and Greek view of God.

Letter from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967
ISRAEL

Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel, expresses appreciation and support for Dr. King's planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the time of this letter, West Jerusalem was Israeli territory and East Jerusalem part of Jordan. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Letter from Eleanor R. Compton to the SCLC

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Michigan (MI)

Eleanor R. Compton, Recording Secretary for the Council on Human Relations, contributes $10 to the SCLC.

Letter from Beryl Bugatch to MLK

Sunday, July 25, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Baltimore, MD

Beryl Bugatch of the University of Pennsylvania asks Dr. King to speak on "the governments role in enforcing racial morality."

Bifurcation of Nature

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead's views on the bifurcation of nature into apparent and causal nature in "The Concept of Nature."

Why We Chose Jail Rather Than Bail

Dr. King outlines eight principal reasons why he and others chose "jail rather than bail." One of the reasons was the idea to appeal to the conscience of their opponents.

Letter from Gloria Fraction to Andrew Young

Tuesday, July 5, 1966
Chicago, IL

Gloria Fraction tells Andrew Young that the National Merit Scholarship Corporation has invited Dr. King and Mrs. King to attend an honorary dinner for the most outstanding Negro students.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Cover of the Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter

Monday, March 1, 1965
Iowa (IA)

The cover of Iowa's Catholic Interracial Council announces that Dr. King will be the recipient of the 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. The awards banquet is held in Davenport, Iowa.

Report to Agenda Committee

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Junius Griffin sends Bill Berry a report and tentative program regarding summer events in Chicago during the 1966 Civil Rights Campaign.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter from Curtis Harris to Wayne Duncan

Friday, January 1, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Mr. Harris writes to Mr. Duncan informing him that the SCLC has received a petition from the employees at their firm. The SCLC accepted
the petition in order to remove segregation and racial discrimination from society.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., New Jersey (NJ)

Cornelius E. Gallagher writes Dr. King concerning the signing of the discharge petition concerning home rule for the District of Columbia.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Florida (FL), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA)

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addressed multiple issues that they had a misunderstanding about. He then tells Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions. Lastly, he informs Attorney General Cook that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 27, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves sends three checks to Dr. King. The first check is an advance due from Harper and Row, the second represents an advance from NAL and the third is a partial payment from "Life."

Letter from Beatrice Smith to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Beatrice Smith encloses a contribution to Dr. King and explains the interest and sympathy in Dr. King's work. She also expresses concern for the boycott of Alabama product stating that it might result in "more enemies than friends."

Death

Dr. King writes on the "empty feeling" of death, citing St. Augustine's autobiographical book, "Confessions." This index card contains a quote from the work in which the philosopher reflects on the death of his closest friend.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inaugural Concert

Washington, D.C.

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to attend a concert celebrating the inauguration of President John F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. The concert features Mischa Elman, a Russian emigre and famed musician.

Soul Force and Woman Power

This notecard titled Soul Force refers to a Woman Power March to be held on June 19, 1968

Letter from Andrew Young to Reverend B. J. Cameron

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Andrew Young, acting as Executive Assistant to Dr. King, responds to Rev. Cameron's letter regarding SCLC's involvement in Grenada, Mississippi. He assures Rev. Cameron that the SCLC has not forgotten about Grenada and discusses plans to see him in the future.

Anonymous Telegram to President Johnson

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO)

This telegram, intended for the White House, was sent regarding the treatment of a former African American Secret Service agent, Abraham Bolden, at the federal medical center in Springfield, Missouri. The sender states that President Johnson ought to follow the United States Constitution and restore Mr. Bolden's freedom or face consequences.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.

Letter from Mrs. Emma L. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

Emma L. Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church requesting permission to use his name and picture on their key ring project.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Gladys Foreman

Friday, February 15, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dora McDonald thanks Ms. Gladys Foreman for her contribution of stamps.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.