Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Massachusetts (MA)"

Request from The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization inquires if Dr. King would be available to speak to the institute about the concept of Black Power.

Letter from James H. Scheuer to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

James H. Scheuer, a representative of the United States Congress, informs Dr. King about the dismissal of the Mississippi challenge. Despite this action, Scheuer asserts that the attention received is a victory within itself. He concludes by stating "We must all work together to insure maximum enforcement of the Voting Rights Bill".

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King references McTaggart's perception of religion as being an emotional resting between ourselves and the universe.

Barth - The Epistle to the Romans

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

The SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) issues a program addressing the goals of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The Chicago Freedom Movement is composed of a coalition of organizations who have decided to eradicate slums, ghettos and racism from the city.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter White

Friday, September 10, 1965

Dora McDonald notifies Peter White, of the University of Western Ontario, that Dr. King is unable to accept any additional speaking engagements for the "next seven or eight months."

Mission to Mississippi

The document, shown here, listed Dr. King and many other clergy as they invited other clergyman nationwide to an event called "Mission to Mississippi." The Mission was in support for the Freedom Riders of 1961. It included a one-day conference that was held in Jackson, MS. July 20, 1961. Unfortunately, this document was torn in half so the full remaining content continues, on the following attached page.

Letter from MLK to David J. Walker

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Junior Board of Trade to speak in Toronto.

Ritschl, Albrecht

Dr. King provides a biographical sketch of German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Letter from W.O. Gill to MLK

W. O. Gill expresses his gratitude for the generosity that Coretta Scott King extended to him. He then tells Mrs. King that his secretary is sending her a check for $2.00, and that he looks forward to being able to visit with Dr. King. He ends the letter with a quote from the bible.

Introduction of Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King introduces Robert Kennedy at a gathering in Jackson, Mississippi, calling him a "capable statesman" with a "great social vision."

SCLC Newsletter: April 1962

Sunday, April 1, 1962

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference announces five new members will join the staff. The five men are: John H. Calhoun, Herbert V. Coulton, James L. Bevel, Fred C. Bennette, and Bernard S. Lee. These men derive from different locations across America and add different levels of education and commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

The Crozer Theological Seminary Student Chapel - Order of Service

Friday, January 27, 1950

This order of service outlines the events taken place during student chapel at The Crozier Theological Seminary. The service was guided by presiding student, Fred Eugene Stom, and focused heavily on Christian affirmations and the reciting of the ten commandments.

Letter from the Brotherhood Activities Committee to MLK

Thursday, October 31, 1963

The Brotherhood Activities Committee regrets that Dr. King will be unable to attend their speaking engagement. The committee requests that Dr. King provide them with a possible spokesman to speak in his absence. Fred Shuttlesworth and Morgan Collins serve as two primary options to serve the Ohio-West Virginia community.

Letter to Melvin Arnold from MLK

Wednesday, December 26, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Dr. King informed him that he has enclosed the final draft of the sixteen sermons to be included, in his second book. He also added that he was in the process of working on the final two sermons to be published in the book.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Letter from MLK to Thomas J. Dodd

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas J. Dodd's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King, thanking him for his financial pledge to the college and asking him to join the Morehouse men who have either paid out their pledges or whose pledges are up to date. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Forgiveness

Dr. King provides several definitions of the word forgiveness according to several outside references.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to Dr. Homer A. Jack

Monday, August 30, 1965

Ralph Abernathy follows up with Dr. Jack about a conversation they had regarding funds for the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. Abernathy encloses a check from the SCLC for the fund, which will provide the family of the slain civil rights protestor with a total of $70 per month. Abernathy also confirms that the fund will also provide a scholarship to Jackson's sister.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Peggy Duff invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen on behalf of the Danish Peace Movement.

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Statement by MLK & Dr. W. G. Anderson

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Dr. King and Dr. Anderson release a statement declaring a "Day of Penance" for those in the Negro community who have not yet adopted the nonviolent strategy.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

Invitation to King's House, Jamaica

Governor-General Clifford Campbell invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a dinner at King's House, Jamaica. King's House is the official residence of the Governor General.

Letter from James Thomas to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Mr. Thomas, Chairman of the Committee for the Improvement of Public Schools, requests Dr. King to "contact citizens protest." The protest is for blacks who are highly qualified for positions and have been turned down.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.