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Spring Mobilization Committee Roundup of Nationwide Mobilization Activity

Monday, April 3, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, California (CA), Berkeley, CA, Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Connecticut (CT), New Jersey (NJ), Pennsylvania (PA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, New Hampshire (NH), Texas (TX), Iowa (IA), CANADA, Kansas (KS), Wisconsin (WI), Maine (ME), Minnesota (MN), South Dakota (SD), Ohio (OH), Indiana (IN), North Dakota (ND), Philadelphia, PA, Pittsburgh, PA, Washington (WA), Missouri (MO), AUSTRALIA, Tennessee (TN), Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C., West Virginia (WV), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Cincinnati, OH

This document outlines activities around the country leading up to the April 15 Spring Mobilization Against the War in Vietnam rally in New York City.

Letter to Rev. MLK, Sr. from Arlen Fuhlendorf

Monday, April 8, 1968
Texas (TX)

Mrs. Arlen Fuhlendorkr writes to Rev. King Sr., expressing deep sympathy for the death of Dr. King. She also wanted to convey to Rev. King that he should be proud of the great work his son did for humanity.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1956
Nashville, TN, Montgomery, AL, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL)

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Tentative Schedule for MLK

Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Baltimore, MD, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Cleveland, OH, Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL

This document outlines Dr. King's tentative schedule of cities and states he will tour.

Dr. King-Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brown's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Chicago, IL

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Synagogue Council of America

This pamphlet provides information on the Synagogue Council of America, including its goals and financing methods. The Council was formed to unite the orthodox, conservative and reform Jewish movements into a single group.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. White

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. White for considering him to be on Per Se Advisory Board, but due to a busy schedule Dr. King declines his offer.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD)

Flozella Clark and Agnes Edwards congratulate Dr. King for being awarded the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. They also share what Dr. King's achievement means to them.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God" as an able defense on mysticism.

Neoplatonism

Dr. King describes neoplatonism as "ideas of God." Neoplatonism is focused on the thoughts of Greek Philosopher, Plato.

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

Crozer Theological Seminary Telethon

Pennsylvania (PA), Chester, PA

Crozer Theological Seminary, Dr. Kings alma mater, issues a solicitation for contributions to its almnus. The letter states that alumni receiving the letter were not able to be reached during the "Crozer Alumni Telethon." Dr. King attended the religious institution from 1948-1951 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from Morehouse College.

Letter from R. Elliot of B.M. Heede, Inc. to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968
CANADA, New York (NY), San Francisco, CA

This letter is an inquiry and request for feedback on the redevelopment plans of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

News/Letter: Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

Here is a 1967 newsletter from the Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence, covering a number of topics including the Vietnam War, the March on Washington, fascism, and non-violent tactical plans.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

Colwell, Ernest Cadman

Dr. King references Ernest Caldwell's book "Toward Better Theological Education."

Letter from Fred S. Bertsch Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965
Michigan (MI), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Fred Bertsch Jr., Principal of the Holland School in Michigan, informs Dr. King that the school has made other arrangements for its commencement ceremony.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Letter from William L. Hudson to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
San Francisco, CA

William Hudson of the Commonwealth Club of California extends his gratitude to Dr. King for an address given to the Club.

Letter from MLK to W. Russell Chapman of the NAACP

Thursday, February 1, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the York County NAACP.

Letter from Hester DeLacy to MLK

Los Angeles, CA

Hester De Lacy contributes to the SCLC and expresses an urgent need for written copies of Dr. King's speeches. Mr. De Lacy informs Dr. King that he would prefer a copy of a speech delivered to a large and small audience in both the North and South of the country.

Letter from Mary Welcome to MLK

Minnesota (MN), Alabama (AL)

Miss Welcome praises the work that Dr. King has done for civil rights. She also offers him her prayers and promises to send money to aid the cause when she is able to afford it.

Telegram from Ambassador Ade Martins to MLK

NIGERIA

This telegram was sent to Dr. King and Theodore Brown by N. Ade Martins, the Ambassador of Nigeria. He explains the reaction of Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, the commander in chief of the armed forces, to Dr. King's letter concerning the violence in Nigeria.

Letter from Lyman Farrar to Ralph David Abernathy regarding Advice and Counsel

Monday, April 29, 1968
Michigan (MI)

Mr. Farrar writes to Dr. Abernathy for advice and cousel in an effort to contact Negro colleges in the United States. Mr. Farrar would like to make a personal contribution for a cause in which he explains in an enclosure.

Letter from Patricia M. Shillingburg to Walter Fauntroy

Tuesday, January 16, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Patricia M. Shillingburg requests payments that she has yet to recieve upon her release from the SCLC during her assistance with the Harry Belafonte Concert. After making numerous attempts to discover the reason of her release and location of her funds, Ms. Shillingburg informs Rev. Walter Fauntroy that she will take alternative appropriate steps to secure the payment of her services.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Turkenkopf to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New Jersey (NJ), Oslo, Norway

Overwhelmed by the news of MLK winning the Noble Peace Prize, Mrs. Turkenkopf expresses her congratulations to Mrs. King.

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Thursday, November 23, 1967
New York (NY)

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.