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Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 13, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee, attempts to reschedule an event previously canceled by Dr. King. Shaefer informs Dr. King's secretary, Ms. McDonald, of the hundreds of people that purchased tickets to attend the event and their desire to have it rescheduled.

Anonymous Letter on Chicago Slums

Thursday, February 10, 1966

A disgusted city taxpayer from Chicago writes to Dr. King regarding the condition of slums in Chicago. It is believed that Dr. King and other leaders should stop wasting time on marches and teach young Negroes religion.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Letter from James H. MacDonald to MLK

Friday, June 16, 1967

James MacDonald asks Dr. King to send a statement regarding his personal struggles to assist with the sermon MacDonald will deliver to his congregation. MacDonald also seeks advice on how to integrate his church.

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Letter from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Friday, November 22, 1963

The executive director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. communicates to the recipient that despite the raids by the state and city police, the organization is attempting to continue operations. The police stripped the SCEF of numerous documentation and correspondence information. The director is certain they would be able to obtain success with the moral support in New Orleans and a possible contribution from the recipient. Of significance is the letter's date: the day of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967

Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding his recent trip to Mississippi. Kennedy tells of his engagement with the Department of Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Employment in efforts to help relieve the present hunger crisis. The focus is "to provide more and better food" to people with low income or no income at all. He also wants the committee and Congress to pay close attention to this subject and encourages an analysis of the food stamp system.

Judgment

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

Letter from Richard W. Boone to MLK

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

A letter from Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens Crusade Against Poverty, to Dr. King, enclosing the preliminary draft of the C.C.A.P.'s training proposal to the Ford Foundation.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

MLK Itinerary

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Dr. King's secretary is writing Joan Daves to notify her of his speaking engagements for the 1964-1965 season.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Friday, May 28, 1965

Laurence Kirkpatrick writes Dr. King on behalf of the World Convention of Churches and Christ expressing their appreciation for Dr. King's acceptance of their invitation and discusses the travel logistics.

Letter from MLK to Earl Hall

Friday, July 14, 1967

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. Earl Hall, who sent a letter to the "National Observer" in defense of Dr. King.

Letter from Sonia Schechter to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962

Sonia Schechter, President of Jewish Cultural Clubs and Societies, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC. Schechter also expresses great admiration to Dr. King for his "heroic leadership."

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.

Letter from Margie Edmondson to MLK Regaring a Speaking Engagement

Thursday, February 10, 1966

In this letter, Margie Edmondson of Chicago, Illinois invites Dr. King to speak to local youth at a bi-monthly meeting of the Junior Christian Inter-Racial Commission.

Letter from Charles W. Martine to Ohio Senator

This letter from Dental Technician Charles W. Martin speaks out against the racism in America. He denounces George Wallace as a racist candidate for the 1968 Presidential Election, admonishes members of Congress for not speaking out against Mr. Wallace, and states he will leave the service if Mr. Wallace is elected to the Presidency.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Our God is Able

Sunday, January 4, 1953

Reverend Frederick M. Meek retells a story in the New Testament about a civilization and their journey to discover that God is able.

Let's Be Human

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Newspaper Article on MLK Advertisement in "The Washington Afro-American" August 29, 1964

Saturday, August 29, 1964

Here, in this newspaper clipping, is an advertisement of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", The ad also makes reference to the reverend, being chosen as Time magazine's "Man of the Year".

Chicago Freedom Rally

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.