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"Massachusetts (MA)"

Letter from James E. Doherty to MLK Regarding School Desegregation

Monday, September 4, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Doherty encloses an article that includes civil right leaders views on school desegregation.

Letter from James McLaurin to MLK and Andrew Young

Tuesday, March 15, 1966

James McLaurin asks Dr. King to spend part of a day with the students and faculty at Garrett. The topic that they want Dr. King to speak about is the seminary's role in the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK's Graduation Picture From Boston University

Monday, June 1, 1959

This photograph captures Dr. King in his graduation gown from Boston University.

MLK's Mandate for White Christians Review

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Dr. King provides a review for Kyle Hazelden's book, "Mandate for White Christians." In his review he gives an overview of the book's content, along with his opinion on its value.

MLK's Newsweek Statement

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King issues a statement on the defeat of a federal agency that would have allowed an African American to obtain a cabinet position within the national government.

Note Card Entitled Atheism

Atheism is cited from Sparrier in this note card.

God

Dr. King expresses the power of God as being infinite beyond comprehension of man.

Copernicus

Dr. King discusses how the discoveries of renowned astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and German philosopher Immanuel Kant revolutionized thinking regarding the human mind. The note card also outlines philosophical views originating from the "analogy of two clocks" referencing prominent thinkers Rene Descartes and Gottfried Leibniz.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. to MLK

Harry Van Arsdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO, informs Dr. King, who is in the Fulton County Jail, that ten thousand unionists in New York voted to support Dr. King's fight for "decency and democracy." The organization contributes $1000 to aid Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

God

Dr. King quotes St. Thomas Aquinas on the concept of God.

Immaculate Conception

Dr. King reflects on the birth of Christ and the fact that Mary was "kept free from original sin."

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Letter from Nancy Claytor to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Nancy Claytor requests Dr. King's permission to use lines from "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" for the publication "The Methodist Student V-VI."

Letter from Thomas Gilliam to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Thomas Gilliam writes this letter with hope that Dr. King will grant him an interview about the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Fixler

Friday, December 8, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Bernard Fixler, from Dr. King, he thanks Mr. Fixler for the contribution made to the SCLC.

Housing Report to the SCLC Board of Directors

Members of the SCLC Board of Directors were the recipients of this detailed report outlining solutions to end the slum crisis in the North.

Telegram from Rev. Harold Carlson to MLK

Thursday, September 19, 1963

Reverend Harold E. Carlson sends words of encouragement to Dr. King. Carlson prays for continued strength and courage for King's "holy cause."

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

Thursday, December 15, 1966

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, asks Dr. King if he would consider becoming a sponsor for the organization.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Statement from Grace H. Giles

Grace H. Giles writes Reverend Ralph Abernathy and requests that he share a vision with her. She also includes several meaningful words and acronyms that she created.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Letter from C.A. Echols to MLK

Thursday, July 1, 1965

C.A. Echols requests a copy of Dr. King's publication "The Time for Freedom Has Come" to be included in his upcoming thesis "Thoreau and Civil Disobedience."

Max Stanford's Account

This document written by an anonymous writer illustrates how officers attacked Max Stanford, a convicted felon, in a jail when he refused to obey a guard.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.