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"Massachusetts (MA)"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Michael J.. Gerstley

Friday, March 29, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Miss McDonald sends Michael Gerstley an autographed card per Dr. King's instructions.

Letter from Herbert J. Kramer to John W. Bloomer

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Herbert J. Kramer informs the managing editor of Birmingham News, about "America's New Commitment" and the "Plowshare Pledge."

Letter from John Frankel to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967
Washington, D.C., JAMAICA

John Frankel expresses gratitude to Dr. King on behalf of Sargent Shriver for supporting the efforts of the Queens Clinical Society in South Jamaica.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), VIETNAM

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Letters from Ambassadors


Dr. King notes the letters that he has received from several Ambassadors. He also notes the confirmed appointments with the Ambassadors.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

Sunday, April 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Dexter Echo: February 3, 1960

Wednesday, February 3, 1960
FRANCE, London, England, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Johannesburg, South Africa

This issue of the Dexter Echo honors Dr. and Mrs. King's final day at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Note from Mrs. Phyllis J. Sundquist to MLK

Oregon (OR)

Mrs. Phyllis Sundquist encourages Dr. King to continue his stance against the Vietnam War for the betterment of the United States.

Graduate Candidate Notice from Boston University

Monday, December 7, 1953
Boston, MA

This is a notice to all possible candidates for the degree of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in June or August of 1954. The notice explains what is required of those who wish to obtain their degree by these dates.

MLK Postcard - American Negro Emancipation Centennial

Wednesday, January 1, 1964
Ohio (OH), Montgomery, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Washington, D.C.

The American Negro Emancipation Centennial issued this 1964 postcard containing Dr. King's brief biography. The postcard was designed to be used as a study guide in Negro history.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Harvey Cox

Monday, August 2, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL)

Andrew Young requests a photograph and biographical sketch of Harvey Cox, a well known theologian. The materials will be used for publicity of a convention that Cox will be making an address.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Wednesday, February 15, 1967
Florida (FL), New York, NY

In this letter Joan Daves requests Dr. King's input on his chapter, "Black Power." Daves also inquires as to which magazine to send the manuscript first and suggests first sending it to "Life" magazine.

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Letter from Ram Bagai to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York, NY, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Ram Bagai, President of Films of India, writes Dr. King to support him and his affiliation with the Civil Rights Movement. He also seeks to become a financial donor to assist Dr. King. Bagai discusses a film entitled "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands," which is set to premiere in New York, and offers the proceeds to Dr. King to assist in his endeavors.

Telegram from MLK to William Miller

Friday, February 16, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King writes Mr. William O. Miller, of the Concerned Teachers and Parents of Philadelphia, commending them for their efforts advocating for African-American education in their community.

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
Pittsburgh, PA

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

Hamilton Goodwill Africa Foundation Invitation to MLK

Friday, June 3, 1966
CANADA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

A.K. Mighton invites Dr. King to speak at the Hamilton Goodwill Africa Foundation. He informs Dr. King of a trip to Africa in which several doctors and ministers traveled to Africa. Mr. Mighton then expresses his hopefulness in Dr. King's acceptance of his invitation.

Letter from Max Hess to MLK

Monday, May 14, 1962
California (CA)

Mr. Hess expresses his sincere admiration for Dr. King stating, "you have done more than stood fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free."


Dr. King uses a verse from the Book of Nehemiah to illustrate God's faithfulness.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Wisconsin (WI), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Memphis, TN, Jackson, MS, MARTINIQUE, ALGERIA, VIETNAM, Missouri (MO)

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Saturday, February 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Missions Magazine published various articles concerning the baptist ministry and how the church is impacting its surrounding community. Dr. King contributed to the magazine by writing an article entitled "Out of the Long Night of Segregation." In the article, he writes about the nonviolent methods being used to end segregation in America.

Adverse Postcard

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Des Moines, IA, Nebraska (NE), Cleveland, OH, Mississippi (MS)

The author of this postcard questions the concept of Black Power and informs Dr. King of his dismay for integration.

Fleeing From God

This sermon, delivered by Dr. King on April 4, 1956, discusses the human desire to escape God. Dr. King attributes this inclination to the fact that man wants to hide from God's immanent nature and harbors a general unwillingness to follow God's commandments.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

In A Land Where Murder is Respectable

Alabama (AL)

This pamphlet, issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, features a map of Alabama highlighting 18 murders of African Americans and white civil rights workers.

An Invitation to the Honoring of Rabbi Israel Dresner and Reverend Richard Wilson

New Jersey (NJ)

This document serves as an invitation to a event honoring Rabbi Dresner and Rev. Wilson for their outstanding spiritual leadership.

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.